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“No breath taken during the set will involve the complete exchange of the full tidal volume of your lungs. This takes too long, requires too much relaxation, and is unnecessary. Breathing during the set consists only of topping off the huge breath taken before the first rep, after a quick exhalation that might consist of only 10% of tidal volume. This short refresher of air is just enough to allow the set to be finished more comfortably. The fact that it amounts to so little air is the reason you might decide to forego it in favor of maintaining tightness, after you practice it.”


'No breath taken during the set will involve the complete exchange of the full tidal volume of your lungs.This takes too long, requires too much relaxation, and is unnecessary.'

-okay, fine i got it.But i don't understand what he says further. Please someone explain me.

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He's basically saying inhale as much air as you can at the top during lockout. Hold your breath through the rep (read Valsalva maneuver). Exhale slightly (10%) after the rep at lockout. Then inhale again to full capacity before performing the next rep. Repeat for each rep until the set is complete.

The slight exhalation allows you to maintain tightness as a full exhalation may cause you to relax too much to complete the set.

Practically speaking, it takes practice and experience to do this effectively without becoming lightheaded. The most important part of the technique is holding your breath through the rep to maintain tightness. Don't worry too much about the 10% partial exhalation part, and just breath normally while locked out. Just remember to inhale again before starting the next rep.

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