0

So I've been doing push-ups for over six years and the first five years it was quite simple 6x20 sets of push-ups, without any pull-ups. Rarely an injury, and the ones that I had was somewhere at the upper back --though I forgot where exactly.

Now, for the past half year I have increased sets and amount, and added pull-ups to my training routine. As I'm a beginner to pull-ups I take it very slow and build it up gradually. Yet, I have gotten two injuries in the past month from either push-ups or pull-ups. Possible rhomboids injury. A few weeks ago it was my left rhomboid, and last night, out of nowhere, when I woke up to go to the toilet, it suddenly hit me in my right-rhomboid.

I noticed that when I stretch my neck to the left side, I can feel the stretch in my right-rhomboid (where the pain is). when I do push- or pull-ups now, I don't feel the pain.

Yesterday I only did half a set of pull-ups because I was afraid I wasn't warm enough. I usually do a warm-up jog of 5 to 8km, but yesterday, I finished only 4km and walked-out for the remaining 2km. Yet, I completed my full push-up training. So I pressume it's from the push-ups.

  1. What do I do to prevent my rhomboid injury?
  2. Is this possible rhomboid-injury from push-ups or is it from pull-ups?
  3. Did my body become too cold, after a 2km walk-out, for a heavy training?
  4. Is it possible that the rhomboid-inury is caused by bad form, like for example, having your elbows too far out from the body, instead of the proper form where you have them close to the body?

Thank you for your advice people!

[edited: added question #4]

closed as off-topic by JohnP Apr 25 at 14:23

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on general health and medical advice are off-topic here; you should contact a qualified medical professional instead." – JohnP
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Questions 2 and 3 should be removed. We have no way of answering either of those. Questions on injury-prevention is on-topic, but questions regarding existing injury or pain is something we simply have to ask you to take to a doctor, because we can't help diagnose it. We'd need more information than what can be written down. – Alec Mar 24 at 13:20
  • In addition, even if related, se policy is one question per post. As 2,3 and 4 are off topic/unanswerable, I would remove them. – JohnP Apr 24 at 2:53
  • This question is being placed on hold until the user resolves the off topic/multiple questions per post violations. – JohnP Apr 25 at 14:23
1

I noticed that when I stretch my neck to the left side, I can feel the stretch in my right-rhomboid (where the pain is). when I do push- or pull-ups now, I don't feel the pain.

Are you sure it's your rhomboids? And not your traps or levator scapula or something else? You shouldn't feel much of a stretch on your rhomboids simply by pulling your neck to your opposite side. Rhomboid minor does attach to C7 but that's the start of your neck and you typically need to have (pro)traction on the shoulder blade to stretch the rhomboids. They are pretty deep between the shoulder blades and the spine, difficult to stretch.

So I've been doing push-ups for over six years and the first five years it was quite simple 6x20 sets of push-ups, without any pull-ups. Now, for the past half year I have increased sets and amount, and added pull-ups to my training routine.

Without knowing much about your overall routine currently, if you're doing more than 6x20 now (and even 120 reps a day is a little excessive most of the time) it's possible you simply have too much reoccurring volume on the push ups. Regularly doing hundreds of reps of the same movement over and over again with little variety appears to increase the potential for overuse injury.

I usually do a warm-up jog of 5 to 8km, but yesterday, I finished only 4km and walked-out for the remaining 2km. Yet, I completed my full push-up training. So I presume it's from the push-ups.

See my point above. You don't really have to know what exercise 'caused' it, it doesn't matter what caused it, you have to figure out why it's being cranky so you can fix it. A lot of those muscles are involved in both the push up and pull up anyway, so regardless of cause, both could continue to create pain for a variety of reasons.

But also, a warm up of 5-8 km running? Why? That's not a warm up, that's a training session in and of itself. A warm up for resistance training is like 5-15 minutes and I'd say you probably want something more specific to your training as a warm up, not just running.

Unless the training goal is specifically running and push ups/pull ups are an afterthought. In which case, the push ups are definitely excessive volume. That being said, fatigue always hurts performance. There is no way you're not a little tired after even a 4km run. So it could very easily also be a technique issue as the result of too much fatigue.

It's possible that either exercise could lead to such an injury or at least pain. Pain doesn't always correlate with an actual injury and actual injuries don't always yield pain. Pain is more of a warning system and it's prone to faulty wiring sometimes.

For the time being you should take some time off from anything that aggravates it and likely see a physical therapist to determine what's actually going on. They can help you formulate a plan of action for return to your routine.

Now that the rhomboid (assuming it's the rhomboid) is cranky both exercises will likely aggravate it anyway. It needs time to heal.

When it's healed then consider some of the points above. Your routine lacks movement variability, clear progressive overload (6x20 is pretty static), likely a good warm up, there may be some technique issues and more than likely you're simply doing too much inefficiently.

0

First, two injuries in one month means your current approach is seriously wrong. Before I give you my suggestion, let's back up with a tiny bit of theory. A pull-up is a full body weight exercise. By definition, the resistance or load of this exercise cannot be modified. By contrast, if you go to the gym, they have equipment that lets you do the same movement, but which also allows you to modify the load.

What you should do, in my opinion, is to regress the load, i.e. go down to a weight less than your body weight. Which means you need to go the gym to get access to the appropriate equipment. Find a load that doesn't hurt you (maybe half your body weight). Over a period of months, you can progressively increase the load and your connective tissue will hopefully adapt.

In regards to whether bad form contributes to your injury. You might be doing a pull up with bad form. But again, the only way you are going to improve your form is to regress to a lower load and improve your form there. Then, with luck, you will be able to progress back to higher loads and maintain the good form. In summary, you are only going to learn better form by regressing down to a lower load.

If you continue with your current method of full body weight resistance, then you will almost certainly continue to injure yourself.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.