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I'd like to find some correct and efficient excercises to train and develop just one side of the neck.
I've played Tennis for several years and my neck is lightly asymmetric; my right side is more strong and prominent than the left side specially the anterior and middle scalene muscles. enter image description here

I did and I am still doing, with the help of a phisio, a lot of excercises and stretching for shoulders with rubber band to even my trapezius; the results are pretty good but the neck shape is still not there. The scalene muscles just above the collarbone while thick on the right side are literally inexistent on the left side.

Do you know any excercise to isolate and train these specific anterior muscles of the neck (Anterior and middle scalene), just on one side?

Update:
after reading @David-Scarlett answer I found this article about a baseball pitcher that shows exactly the hypertrophy of the anterior scalene like in my case.

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You can, but probably shouldn't train just one side of the neck.

Any exercise involving neck lateral flexion (bending the head to the side) or rotation can obviously be performed in one direction only, in order to only target specific muscles. However if would be difficult to impossible to perfectly match the stress that tennis imparts on these muscles, and in fact difficult to even determine which muscles you should be targeting. For instance, are you sure it's the scalene muscles that are overdeveloped on one side? These are very deep muscles, buried under the sternocleidomastoid, levator scapulae and trapezius, and aren't likely to be visible.

A better approach is to aim to train the muscles of the neck evenly, by performing resistance exercises involving neck flexion, lateral flexion on both sides, and extension. Resistance can be applied with resistance bands looped across the top of the head. (Rotation exercises are possible too, but resistance is a little trickier.) Weighted shrugs would be a good idea as well. The resistance that you can use will be limited by the weaker muscles, and any muscles that are already strong will not respond to this training, causing the muscle imbalance to gradually disappear.

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  • Thanks David for your answer, please see my update. I quit tennis one and half year ago but it seems that the hypertrophy is still there. Can't really balance the shape of the neck. Look forward to see what weighted shrugs can do. Oct 28 '20 at 13:30
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    @systempuntoout, the key to your question, and mentioned in David's answer is the last sentence; "The resistance that you can use will be limited by the weaker muscles, and any muscles that are already strong will not respond to this training, causing the muscle imbalance to gradually disappear." If you keep up training both sides evenly, the 'weaker' side will respond as it is being challenged and the 'stronger' side won't. Once the imbalance is gone, both sides will respond. You should expect this to take some time.
    – C. Lange
    Nov 4 '20 at 3:54
  • Exactly, that was an interesting take away. One problem I see, is that the unbalance could get even worst if the muscle growing response is not symmetric. Imagine if the neck compensates during the exercise using more the back left trapezius and the front right scalene. In this case, your left weak front neck remains weak, and your front right scalene could became even bigger. That's why I was asking for a specific training isolating just one side of the neck (but I understand it is very difficult). Nov 4 '20 at 9:40

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