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apologies if this is a little long-winded, however, I am looking for some advice.

I'm currently in England and we are in a nationwide lockdown due to COVID-19. I have a selection event for the Army Reserves just after Christmas and as part of this, I need to do a Bleep Test.

How can I practice for a Bleep test without actually measuring 20m out outdoors? Gyms are shut, are will more than likely stay this way for a while so I will struggle to find somewhere indoors to practice.

Looking for exercises that will help with the Bleep test? or suggestions of how I can do a bleep test outdoors without carrying a tape measure with me. Is there, for example, a sports pitch or court that has a 20m side which could be used for the shuttle runs?

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Measure it out in paces

At home, take a tape measure and stand with your back to a wall, heels touching the wall. Take one normal step forward, then measure from the back of your heel to the wall in centimeters. This is your pace length. Let's say you measure 60cm. Now, convert the bleep test distance (20m) to centimeters by multiplying it by 100, which is 2000cm, and divide this by your pace length. If your pace length was 60cm, then 2000/60 is 33.33. That's how many paces you need to measure out for 20m. So when you go outside, to wherever you'll be training, put a bag, water bottle, or other marker down on the ground, place your toes next to the marker, and take 33 steps (or however many you calculated), then place another marker next to your toes. Your markers are now 20m apart.

Then just run a bleep test app on your phone (there are loads of these). If you're in a noisy area and have difficulty hearing the beeps on your phone, maybe use some bluetooth headphones, or put the phone half way between the two markers to make it easier to hear no matter which side you're on. (But make sure it's not in a position where you're likely to step on it while running!)

If you don't have a tape measure, an alternative is to use a ruler to measure the length of your runnings shoes. This is the same as the pace length method, but instead of using paces, you'll walk placing the heel of one foot right up against the toes of the other foot. So if you measure your shoe length as 30cm, then 2000/30 = 66.7 steps, so take 67 steps, heel touching toes, to measure out the 20 metres.

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