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This is a somewhat of a continuation of this question: More hours in the gym

The accepted answer is kinda ambiguous, and my question is slightly different.

I wondered, if I want to achieve similar results to the guy in the article (who went from 33 to below 10 percent bodyfat in six months), do I necessarily have to, eventually, spend 10'ish hours in the gym every day? Is it possible to get your body to below ten percent bodyfat training less than two hours a day?

I am not that concerned about losing weight right now. However, I do want to know more about how I can change my body composition. My experience with weight loss so far has mainly been brain fog and no visible reduction in subcutaneous fat.

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    Not an answer, but this year I did go from 22.2% to 10.9% body fat in ~5 months, training 3-4 times per week, no more than 1h at the gym. Remember: training is just part of the equation. – Luciano Dec 8 '20 at 10:56
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    Not an answer because it's opinion and personal experience, but: finding a regime that you can enjoy or at least just sustain long-term is more important than hitting a goal in a certain timeframe, imo – llama Dec 8 '20 at 19:09
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If I want to achieve similar results to the guy in the article (who went from 33 to below 10 percent bodyfat in six months), do I necessarily have to, eventually, spend 10'ish hours in the gym every day?

No. Absolutely not. Only professional athletes would need to workout that long and they're not weightlifting or running that entire time (learning drills or practicing other skills usually).

Is it possible to get your body to below ten percent bodyfat training less than two hours a day?

Yes. Any effective training program can be done within 1 to 2 hours depending on what the program's goal is.

To lose body fat you need to be in a caloric deficit. Technically speaking, you don't even need to go to the gym to do that. Resistance/weight training helps you retain muscle while losing the fat so you'll have a more "toned" look than just being really skinny. Being in a calorie deficit, particularly a severe calorie deficit, will cause the body to lose both muscle and fat at the same time which is not ideal for health or physique.

Going from 33% to 10% in six months is pretty extreme. The article says he started at 245 lbs at 33% body fat which means he had 80.85 lbs of body fat and 164.15 lbs of lean mass. If he lost 65 lbs of only body fat and gained 5 lbs of muscle, he'd be at 185 lbs with about 9% body fat. Losing 65 lbs in six months means he lost 4 lbs a week.

My guess is (assuming the article is true and they're not lying) he lost a massive bulk of his weight when he was in the extreme caloric deficit of 1100 a day. The article states that he was only losing muscle at this time, but that's wrong. He was losing both muscle and fat at an extreme rate, but it states he went from 33% to 13% in three months so he was losing fat at a much, much faster rate. Then in the last three months he managed to regain what muscle he lost thanks to muscle memory and an extremely strict diet and maybe overshooting some thanks to being severly undertrained.

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Its not about the hours. Its about eating healthy and doing exercise properly. 1 hour of exercise is good. For proper reduction of bodyfat. you have to eat a clean diet more healthy protein foods. Drink plenty of water per day. If you want abs then it almost take 5-6 months to make it clear.

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The gym will help you build muscle, not lose fat and the more you exercise, the hungrier you will become.

Fat loss happens in the kitchen with healthy diet choices. When I moved to a new city where started biking 10 miles a day and ... I gained 30 pounds. I'm approaching 220 now, bike everyday, workout on the rings twice a week doing weighted pushups pullups and rows... and have never been heavier in my life.

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