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Alcohol tricks body to believe there is too much energy in blood, so body is enabled, or forced, to store fat.

So, if one does aerobics or endurance training to burn calories after drinking, does it compromise the fat sediment? I mean, when body receives two messages at the same time, which is too much energy in blood and muscle requires a lot of energy during aerobics, body should tend to spend energy on aerobics instead of store it, right?

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  • “Spend energy instead of store it” spend what energy? Isn’t it already stored? – Tim Jul 20 at 15:17
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    On a website called "physical fitness", I feel like it should be at least mentioned that not drinking alcohol before training is a perfectly fine alternative. – Eric Duminil Jul 20 at 15:21
  • @Tim I mean energy in blood. – Superuser Jul 21 at 7:44
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Alcohol tricks body to believe there is too much energy in blood, so body is enabled, or forced, to store fat.

No, it does not. Alcohol contains energy, and is processed by the body similarly to fat (with an extra couple of steps in the liver needed to convert ethanol to the fatty acid acetate).

Furthermore, the only thing that the body requires in order to store fat is more calories being consumed than are being burned, regardless of the source of the calories.

So, if one does aerobics or endurance training to burn calories after drinking, does it compromise the fat sediment?

If you are able to increase your energy expenditure to be equal to or greater than your energy consumption, then your body will not increase your fat stores. This applies regardless of whether the extra exercise was before or after the alcohol consumption.

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    "the only thing that the body requires in order to store fat is more calories being consumed than are being burned." Incorrect. Hormones are required, such as insulin (see type I diabetics who can not store fat because they don't produce insulin). Hormones such as Insulin are affected by the type of food we eat and drink, such as alcohol. Being dismissive about the role of the liver is also a reductive mistake. – michael Jul 20 at 14:49
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    @michael I feel like that's being excessively pedantic. Insulin is required for human life (type I diabetics will die without exogenous insulin), so I wouldn't include it when describing necessary conditions for metabolism any more than I would oxygen. Furthermore, stating that it is necessary for fat storage sends the inaccurate message that body fat can be controlled by controlling insulin levels, playing into the thoroughly disproven carbohydrate-insulin model of obesity. – David Scarlett Jul 21 at 1:23
  • Thank you for your reply. zhuanlan.zhihu.com/p/49481390 This explains how a temporary chemical tricks body to believe there is plenty of energy and tends to store fat. Unfortunately, it is in Chinese, and unfortunately, I am very bad at online searching for any medical information. As a second language user, medical English looks like alien words to me. Too many Latin words. If you are interested, it is called Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide,NAD. – Superuser Jul 21 at 1:51
  • @Superuser 没关系! 我会说一点中文。Alcohol metabolism in the liver does create NADH, which interferes with metabolism and can cause fatty liver (脂肪肝), but I do not think that it would cause increases in body fat (皮下脂肪组织). In your question, you asked about "fat sediment". Were you asking about liver fat, or body fat? – David Scarlett Jul 21 at 4:06
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    @Superuser the article you linked does not provide any evidence for their claim that the NADH created by alcohol metabolism results in visceral fat gain. They are correct that NADH causes the body to store fat, however this fat storage mainly occurs in the liver (causing fatty liver disease), and this fat storage also requires glucose and fatty acids to be removed from the blood (to create the fat). The body has not actually gained any energy. So I think that the article is wrong because it does not consider that the glucose and fatty acids in the blood must be replenished from visceral fat. – David Scarlett Jul 22 at 14:25

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