2

I am going in the gym for some time and I notice that while I improved my strenght and resistance a lot (I can lift heavier weights and for more repetitions) but I don't notice them growing. What am I doing wrong?

3
  • What does your calorie and protein intake look like? How many calories do you eat in a day and how many grams of protein are in those calories?
    – C. Lange
    Nov 23 '21 at 16:40
  • 2
    Impossible to say with the information provided. Diet? Length of time training? Specific exercise(s) w/ sets/reps? Nov 23 '21 at 16:40
  • It might be worth to try lighter weights with slow controlled eccentric and pause (to take away the stretch reflex) and more reps (10-12).
    – Andy
    Nov 23 '21 at 18:33
5

Strength is faster and easier to measure than muscle growth. Especially starting out, you can notice changes day-to-day or week-to-week. To measure muscle composition, you need to take a measuring tape and measure different points of your body and record over time. This can be tedious and most people don't do it. You can also take progress photos which is less tedious, but gives you less data.

Muscle growth is done slowly over time so you get used to your look. Similar to how you don't notice a child growing taller if you see them every day. You see yourself every day when you look in the mirror or look down, so you don't notice changes. If you took pictures of yourself six months ago and compared to now, you'd probably notice some changes.

Muscle growth is obscured by body fat. Lean people can typically see changes in muscle composition. People with moderate body fat levels (greater than 13% in men) will need to lose the body fat to see the muscle definition.

1
  • 1
    Deev is spot on here, I highly recommend progress pictures. I started taking weekly progress pictures and measurements a little over 2 years ago. Week to week and even month to month I rarely notice any difference, but if you look at a long enough time frame where you have been consistently working out, I think you will be surprised at how much different you look. If you still don't notice a change, I would suggest looking at your food, and sleep habits. Nov 23 '21 at 19:40
1

Adding on to what DeeV said in the prior answer, remember to focus on the eccentric phase of the lift if you want to maximize size growth.

For example, doing a deadlift and dropping the bar from a locked out position is the wrong way to go about getting growth gains. You lose more than half of the potential growth by doing this.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.