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I suppose in some contexts it may be beneficial to fall into a lighter bracket so one is sparring with lighter contenders. Then in other contexts it must be more beneficial to weigh in more heavily, but I can’t think of any examples of such contexts.

In any case, does anything stop contestants in a competition from drinking lots of water and eating lots of food right before their weight measurement is officially taken?

Or conversely from taking tons of (otherwise legal/permitted) diuretics/laxatives and having a big long sweat in the sauna right before if that would so advantage them?

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    I’m voting to close this question because it is not about physical fitness, but is about the rules of some sport that the question does not specify.
    – Thomas Markov
    Apr 16 at 0:19
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    "in other contexts it must be more beneficial to weigh in more heavily, but I can’t think of any examples" The reason why you can't think of any is probably that none exist. Apr 16 at 4:03
  • Well don’t boxers for example like to keep their weight down because they consider extra weight a disadvantage? Apr 16 at 9:08
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    A boxer does not gain any advantage from temporarily increasing their weight by drinking a lot of water immediately before a weigh in. Apr 18 at 1:35

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