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Imagine laying on one’s back on a bench, arms extended straight toward the back of the bench, pointing away from one’s feet. Then, bending the elbows down to grab gold off the sides of the bench, and then, lifting up the hips to mostly bend at the neck with the rest of one’s body pointing straight up to the sky. (Incidentally, does this position itself have a name? I guess it almost resembles the setup for a dragon flag.)

Then, bending at the hips , perhaps with a dumbbell gripped vertically between one’s feet, lowering one’s legs down over one’s head and then raising them again back up to vertical. It seems to target mostly the hamstrings.

In a way it seems to be a kind of inverted version of Romanian deadlifts, but does it have any advantages or disadvantages against normal RDLs?

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  • "does it have any ... disadvantages against normal RDLs?" Off the top of my head, it sounds like you'd be balancing a lot of weight on your neck for a long extended period of time, and there's no possible way you could load enough weight on your hamstrings to effectively train them. Whoever you saw doing this wasn't doing them to replace RDLs.
    – DeeV
    Jan 4 at 18:51
  • Please don’t hold a dumbbell above your head with your feet.
    – Thomas Markov
    Jan 4 at 18:55
  • Also yeah. Don't hold weight over your head with your feet.
    – DeeV
    Jan 4 at 18:56

1 Answer 1

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I’ll call it an “inverted reverse hyperextension”.

Let me state up front, PLEASE DO NOT HOLD A DUMBBELL ABOVE YOUR HEAD WITH YOUR FEET. This is a catastrophically stupid thing to do. You could die. Not “you might hurt yourself”. You could literally die if you drop a dumbbell on your face.

That said, the movement and loading pattern you are describing seems pretty close to a reverse hyper, just upside down.

This article has an explanation of the movement (photos taken from article).

enter image description here

enter image description here

If you really wanted to do this movement pattern, you could probably do it safely by laying on the floor with a cable stack.

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