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I am trying to get back in shape and started running. After a few runs (treadmill at the gym) both my knees are really hurting.

  • Is this due to a lack of stretching?
  • Is this overcompensating for weakness in other muscles ?

What would i be doing that would make my knees hurt. I have run in the past and never had this specific pain.

Also, is there any recommendation to heal from this. I have stopped running for 3 days and my knees still hurt even when walking or going up stairs, etc.

If it is weakness in other leg muscles I would appreciate any exercise suggestions

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    When your knees hurt after running, it's usually an indication that your thigh/hip muscles are not strong enough, and your knees are bearing the brunt. You can work on strengthening your hamstrings, quads, abductor/adductor muscles, hips and glutes. – talonx May 26 '12 at 4:11
  • @talonx - any suggested exercises to help this? – leora May 26 '12 at 11:44
  • Have shared some links which I found helpful - have put as an answer as it's better formatted. – talonx May 26 '12 at 17:44
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When your knees hurt after running, it's usually an indication that your thigh/hip muscles are not strong enough, and your knees are bearing the brunt. You have to systematically strengthen your various leg muscles. Here's what has helped me (non-exhaustive list but covers the major categories)

And specifically for knees

Hope this helps.

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Exactly what i felt like 2 years ago. When i used to do cardio workouts, noticed that my knees do hurt after just 10-15 mins of running. So, i started taking some calcium supplements with drinking protein shake with milk and also included some light-heavy leg workouts like squats. I never felt a pain on my knees after just a week.

Our knees are week to handle the pressure. All we need to do is to strength it. You'll be fine unless you have had some kind of knee surgery.

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Your running gait matters too. If unsure, you can get a physiotherapist or trainer (one that specialise in that) to assess your gait.

Stretching does not really help. Some research out there suggests that stretching does not actually prevent injuries. It is better to do dynamic warm up - jumping jacks, slow jogs for 5-10mins.

You can try some active recovery - walking, swimming. Look out for inflammation. It your knee is swollen, apply ice and seek professional help.

Train the muscles mentioned excellently above. Our muscles act as force absorbers and work to both propel our body forward (concentric action of muscles) and also to prevent us from falling down (eccentric action of muscles). Shin splint may be a common occurrence if you haven’t been training and jumped right back into it, too fast and too intense.

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