16

First let's see how the exercises square up on the whole. Studies have been performed regarding the EMG (electromyography) activity for various abdominal muscles in a variety of exercises. You will find the results for the exercises in stimulation of the rectus abdominis and obliques, relative to the traditional crunch, in this Wikipedia section: https://en....


9

Why Do Abs Exercises Have So Many Reps? Short Answer: To feel "The Burn" Many people erroneously feel that most abs exercises are cardio exercises. As a result, they try to perform as many reps in as short a time frame as possible. First, because the abdominal muscles perform many functions,they're capable of being stressed longer than most muscles. As a ...


8

Soreness does not mean that you had a good workout (or vice versa), it means you had a workout you weren't used to. I've been lifting for a few years and I never feel sore, except for when I've had a long time off.


8

Easy peezy! If I were to punch you, and you were ready for it, you would 'tense' up and hold your breath correct? 'Tightening' your abs work much the same way. Don't push the stomach out, or breath out. You actually need to inhale, and 'brace for impact'. That's tightening the core.


8

Everyone wants a six-pack and everyone wants to increase core strength, but should you do abs exercises every day to accomplish that goal? Some of the most frequent questions I get about abs training are – “Can you work out abs everyday“, or “Should I workout abs everyday“? Conventional wisdom tells you the more abs exercises you do, the better. The short ...


8

Just to get this out of the way Probably one of the most commonly uttered phrases around here, but it can't be said often enough: A flat belly is made in the kitchen, not in the gym. It doesn't matter how strong your core is; if it's covered in a thick layer of fat, no one will see it. And ab workouts do NOT burn belly-fat specifically. See: Is spot ...


7

First you should have clear some concepts. You don't burn fat on belly by doing abs, nor do you make ab muscles visible by doing abs. As it's said, abs are made in the kitchen. Doing abs workout, what you do is make them bigger, as with other muscles. You should focus your routine almost the same way you focus it for muscle gain, but introduce some more ...


7

No. Diarrhea is a symptom of what's going on inside your stomach. Your abdominal muscles are outside, and don't have any effect on your digestive system. If you have a problem with diarrhea, you should take a second look at what you're eating, as a poor diet is the number one cause of diarrhea. If you're certain that it's not the diet, see a doctor. You ...


6

Sounds like that guy doesn't know what he's talking about. There's nothing wrong with working abs after another body part.


6

The rectus abdominus works to curl the torso, and bring the lower part of the ribcage forward and down. It is one muscle, and as such, any exercise that curls the body works the entire muscle. The "upper and lower" abdominal belief is pretty much a myth. Whether you curl down towards your legs or up towards your head, the entire muscle is contracting. The ...


6

Consider for a moment that a major job for your abs is not to pull your chest to your knees (crunch and sit up style), but to remain erect and not collapse like when doing a front squat: Crunches and sit ups don't have a large isometric component, as where something like front squats, deadlifts, and planks do. Most of what we want our backs to do in daily ...


6

Squats train all of the supporting muscles of the torso -- including the anterior/abdominal muscles -- if you use a Valsalva maneuver. Consider performing each squat repetition using these steps: Inhale as deeply as you can. Hold your breath by closing your glottis ("throat"), not just your lips. Contract your torso muscles hard, including your abdominal ...


6

The amount of (appropriate intensity) training volume necessary to maintain Ab Hypertrophy is typically going to be zero sets per week. The minimum volume required to make progress is also typically going to be zero sets per week assuming that you are also doing heavy lifts that require core stabilization like squats and deadlifts. If you aren’t however, (...


5

What you want to do is use Prilepin tables, which specify how many sets of which duration you should hold for optimal (or near optimal) progress. The goal is always to have about 60 seconds total hold time; once you can do this in a single set it is time to progress to a harder variation (otherwise, you are no longer doing strength work). In the case of a ...


5

Handstands are mostly skill work, rather than strength work (other than right at the beginning) -- you are learning to balance, to make small adjustments in order to stay upright. Therefore, it cannot replace the plank. If you are looking for ab specific work harder than planks, consider ab wheel rollouts or L-sits. Additionally, you'll want to do ...


5

Hi Sanoj, At your current height and weight, you're not fat (healthy weight, ideal weight based on height, and BMI calculation). As a result, I highly doubt that dieting would help you achieve your goal. Since you're not fat and you have a belly fat, it's likely as a result of your current lifestyle (unless it's a medical condition). Do you sit a lot (...


5

There are two major types of muscle contractions - Isometric and Isotonic. Isotonic - This is the "typical" type of muscle contraction, in that it produces movement. The muscle contracts and shortens, and causes movement, such as bringing the hand to the shoulder for a bicep curl. Isometric - This is a contraction where the muscle does not shorten, ...


5

You may find some helpful information in this post-partum/saggy belly q/a. Since you are able to improve the look with muscular contraction, you should consider specific exercises to target your abs and pelvic floor muscles before considering abdominoplasty. There are several muscles that you want to address: The Transverse Abdominus (TvA) - This is the ...


5

You Won't Have DOMS on Your Abs.......and that's an awesome thing! Your abs muscles' primary function is to stabilize your upper body; this comprises more than half of your body weight. They also assist your lower body with your numerous movement, balance, and co-ordination. What do you think would happen if your core is so sore it can't keep you up? ...


5

And does this mean I'm not having progress or not doing enough? There’s a common perception that DOMS is a valid indicator for muscle hypertrophy, and, is a desirable goal for muscular gain. It’s generally accepted that DOMS is not caused by lactic acid build up, as was originally thought, but, actually occurs due to connective tissue micro trauma. It’s a ...


5

There's no “magic” set of exercises to get great abs. That's because great abs are a result of genetics, proper nutrition, and a long commitment to hard work. Each of of has one or more body parts that are stubborn, or, lack the degree of improvement we seek. The only proven technique is committing to a regular exercise program that works the entire body, ...


5

Sounds like your transverse abdominus is very weak and the rest of your core needs stability training to teach them to work properly before moving onto dynamic training. You're onto something with the planks.. your back starts hurting because your abs "give out" and your back takes over. The second your back hurts you need to quit. You can try planks ...


4

To use the plank to get stronger, you should plank for strenuous but submaximal times. In your case that would probably be sets of about 20 seconds, using multiple sets (e.g. 3-6) and resting briefly (e.g. 15 to 90 seconds) between sets. Aim for a reliable 40-second hold in a month or two. I agree with Arthlete that the only option that looks really ...


4

First of all why do you focus only on the plank to maximize the holding time? You can work other exercises that are going to help you with your plank. your whole body is involved in the plank - shoulders, back, legs, abs. Figure out which part of the body dies first and try to strengthen it. Of course this is not a matter of strength as it is more a matter ...


4

I don't know what your body fat percentage is but you need to have around 10% to have visible abs, mine is lower and I still barely see them. One way to make your abs more visible is to do actual weighted ab exercises. Most fit people can do well over 20 situps which is no longer stimulating hypertrophy, if you try situps with some weight you may see ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible