8

Just to get this out of the way Probably one of the most commonly uttered phrases around here, but it can't be said often enough: A flat belly is made in the kitchen, not in the gym. It doesn't matter how strong your core is; if it's covered in a thick layer of fat, no one will see it. And ab workouts do NOT burn belly-fat specifically. See: Is spot ...


4

How did you injure your back and which part of your back? There are quite a few you can do that have no back contact with the floor, such as: planks (many variations), mountain climbers, L-sits, L-sit leg raises/knee raises if your dumbbells are round and can roll, definitely use them for abwheel roll-outs, amazing exercise if you have something to hang ...


3

The planche does not require any contraction of the abdominal muscles, so that's extremely unlikely to be what's limiting you. The natural tendency of gravity in the planche is to pull your hips down, causing your spine to flex. This is the same movement that is performed by the abs, so it is actually the opposite muscles that must be activated in a planche ...


3

Do they work? Whether or not "they" work depends on which "they" you refer to at any point. A good ab workout works. You're best off finding one made by someone you know is a good source of this kind of information. It's important to be wary and not take advice from anyone who is fit. There are too many people out there flashing their abs,...


3

Control If you were to use only your spinal extensors to counteract the bending force that a deadlift, squat, or row applies to your torso, then those muscles would need to perfectly counteract the continuously changing bending moments exerted by the external load at each of the 17 joints throughout the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. Whereas if instead all ...


3

The "core" is not a particularly well defined group of muscles, but it would commonly include the following muscles. Rectus abdominis: This is the "6 pack" muscle, often just referred to as "the abs". Role: Spinal flexion (bending forwards at the lower back) Isolation exercises: Most ab exercises, including sit-ups, planks, ...


2

The main purpose of the abs is not to do situps but to stabilize the spine. The spine is a bit like an antenna mast. The antenna mast have guy-wires to stabilize it against external forces such as wind: The spine also have guy-wires in the form of muscles running from the base of the spine: the pelvis to the upper part of the spine: The body can adjust the ...


2

Anatomically the lower and upper abs is the same muscle, the rectus abdominis (the six pack). A connection exist between the rectus abdominis and the hip flexors. The hip flexors try to tilt the pelvis forward (anterior) whereas the rectus abdominis try to tilt the pelvis backward (posterior): From (1): "FIGURE 2. The synergistic action of one ...


2

If I'm reading this correctly, you have three questions: will exercise help you lose weight? is this exercise worthwhile? will you have visible abs at your desired weight, despite not having had them when you were at that weight before? Question 1 will exercise help you lose weight? Not much. Exercise gives you muscle, improves endurance, it has lots of ...


2

There are two things to be aware of. One is your rectus transverse abdominus, which the best way to think of it is as a corset around your stomach.. that's how the muscle works. The other is tilting your pelvis. Your TA muscle gets activated by clenching your corset and bracing your abs--act as if someone is about to punch you, you'd tighten and contract ...


2

The opposite plank places load on the posterior chain. The body ‘wants’ to sag downward under its own weight, thereby lengthening the contractile (muscle) and elastic (elastin in the connective tissues) structures of the back, and correspondingly shortening those structures in the front of the body. That tendency is counteracted by the muscles of the ...


2

For lifting, the most important function of abdominal strength is to provide intra-abdominal pressure to counteract sheer and compressional forces on the lumbar spine. This is performed primarily by the transversus abdominus, the diaphragm, and the pelvic floor complex (sometimes known as the pelvic diaphragm), and assisted by the rectus abdominis and ...


2

It sounds like you're getting mixed up between two different uses of "pelvic tilt". In the context of the article you linked, "pelvic tilt" refers to rotation (movement) of the pelvis in space, while the femurs are fixed in position. This is what is supposed occur in the movement of a Romanian deadlift - the legs remain still while the ...


2

When I went to physical therapy, they essentially have you bend in all the directions, extend your back, flex your back, bend side to side, rotate side to side, and do a static crunch(holding it for 10 seconds), leg raise(how high can you left your legs and hold it for 10 seconds, I think you can bend your knees, the point is to hold the position), and ...


2

You're asking two different questions with two different answers. What exercises will increase ab strength without much injury risk to the spine? What exercises will reduce belly fat without much injury risk to the spine? To get the easy one out of the way, there is no such thing as spot fat reduction (outside of surgery). Abs are made in the kitchen, not ...


1

What you're calling "squeezing your abs" is usually referred to as "bracing". Don't think of bracing as squeezing your abs inward. It's actually more of a push outward, together with your breath and your whole core musculature including your obliques, lower back and the inner core, creating a rigid and stable torso. Get your breathing ...


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