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32

You hit on some common misconceptions, but you also hit on some truths. For instance, you compare the human body to inanimate objects with respect to damage, but you also accurately point out that Obviously, living organisms are not the same as inanimate objects So, what's the difference? The repair process Man-made objects tend to wear out faster with ...


30

Please not. While there might be an argument if she starts serious competitive weight lifting, I guess that the question would've been asked differently then. If she is overweight, she has to relearn how to eat properly and develop a healthy relationship with food. If there are no medical reasons, don't waste your money. Learn how to eat everything you ...


18

There was a 2010 study that touched on this a bit, and suggests there's more going on than muscle memory. Effects of previous strength training can be long-lived, even after prolonged subsequent inactivity, and retraining is facilitated by a previous training episode. Traditionally, such "muscle memory" has been attributed to neural factors in the ...


15

There are two concerns I see with the person who waits an extra ten years before becoming active. Sensitive Ages for Athletic Attributes In his book Science of Sports Training, Tom Kurz goes into several pages of detail on how to maximize the potential of an athlete by matching their age-related susceptibility to certain kinds of development with the ...


11

Personally I would look at the leading causes of death in (my case) the United States: Heart disease: 596,577 Cancer: 576,691 Chronic lower respiratory diseases: 142,943 Stroke (cerebrovascular diseases): 128,932 Accidents (unintentional injuries): 126,438 Alzheimer's disease: 84,974 Diabetes: 73,831 Influenza and Pneumonia: 53,826 Nephritis, nephrotic ...


10

The same principles apply whether you're a 20 year-old, 40 year-old, or a 60 year-old. Exercise is always good. The only difference between the age groups is the amount of intensity you should allow yourself. In general I'm 40 now, but ever since 30 I've been concerned about being fit when I get to age 60-80. The thought of shuffling everywhere instead ...


8

This is an interesting question that had me thinking for a while. It's difficult to answer "why" exactly, other than saying "it is that way", so I'll try to describe the need for exercise and a few benefits it gives. @Alec's answer has neatly addressed your questions about wear and tear so I won't address those. One of the things humans ...


7

It's never too late to start a fitness program that adds muscular size to your physique. However, as you age, your levels of testosterone, the muscle promoting hormone, decline. That's not to say that you can't add muscular mass after the age of 30. Many people have. It will, however, require a conscientious effort and hard work over an extended period ...


6

I really didn't get serious about strength training until thirty, and if you look around you'll see people setting records and being incredibly fit in their 40's (and beyond). A good friend of mine is a spokes-model for a supplement company, and his <5% bodyfat shirtless image is on posters in a lot of supplement chain stores. He's 46 this year. In short,...


5

The cheapest piece of exercise equipment for grip strength is one of those binder clips: They come in difference sizes, so start small and work your way up. Pinch it open between your pinky and your thumb. This tip comes from Mr. Ed Coan himself. When your grip breaks, it's always the pinky side first. If you get that side stronger the grip will be ...


5

In addition to what Mark Rippetoe and Lon Kilgore had to say in Practical Programming for Strength Training, as an over 40 lifter I can offer what I've figured out for training at this stage in my life. Jumping right in after any kind of layoff results in very intense DOMS. Just keep at it and your body will get used to it. I can train longer and harder if ...


5

Yes, whey protein can be helpful for elderly people also. The Journal of The American College of Nutrition, JACN, reports that the elderly have greater protein requirements than younger adults. Given that your mother is exercising, ingesting whey protein (or other biologic sources of protein), especially immediately following exercise, may well help her ...


5

I would suggest doing an exercise that will work your grip and another muscle group at the same time, like dead-lifts, shrugs, farmer's walk, etc. Probably the easiest of the ones mentioned would be shrugs and easy to progress since you can incrementally add weight after every week or so. I don't like using straps or gloves or anything that will ...


5

TL;DR: Strength Training can start as early as 7. Serious weightlifting, power-lifting, body-building should wait until later in puberty (11 to 17) when adolescents have reached physical and skeletal maturity. It seems that most resources I've read are in favor of strength training from a young age. I've read that as soon as kids start doing sports (aged 7 -...


5

Consider a knee: The meniscus absorbs much of the shock of jumps and landings. Tears in the meniscus is a common cause of surgery. Sports with high risk of meniscus tear include american football, soccer, basketball and wrestling. Altough running is high impact this injury do not seem to be common here. Rather it seems that rotation of the knee and ...


4

Basing these on my own experience and observation, obviously not all will apply to everyone. Appetite doesn't slow down with your metabolism. For many people, alcohol becomes another huge additional source of calories. The binge drinking in college turns into a few glasses of wine or bottles of beer every night, not to mention many people continue the ...


4

Creatine monohydrate, 5 grams per day, is beneficial in multiple respects and across different fitness goals, especially resistance training and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Protein supplements such as whey protein powder can be beneficial across different fitness goals, too, especially any kind of resistance training. For further reading, ...


4

Do two things: Make this question to a licensed professional who can see your daughter in real life (doctor, nutritionist, even a personal trainer). Free and general advice have either great or terrible effects, depending on so many factors. A doctor might cost the same as the supplements and have better results than any advice here. Exercise with your ...


4

What I am wondering is how my situation should influence my strength training? You should get stronger. Stronger muscles protect joints better than weaker muscles. Yes, fast-twitch muscle fibers tend to atrophy more quickly than do slow-twitch muscle fibers. Effective strength training is the best way to preserve as much of all types of muscle fibers as ...


4

Running properly isn’t bad for your knees, but running in bad form certainly can be. As a matured human being, you should train like a matured human being. It doesn’t matter what age or sex you are, the only factors that might change the way you train are things like injuries, sickness, disabilities, etc (goals too). I read an article once that spoke of how ...


3

A healthy diet means a healthy body, I'm not saying to start a diet, but to eat healthier, more greens, fruits, vegetables, less processed/fast foods. Hair loss can be related to stress, and judging by your work, study field I'm assuming you can be put under a lot of it, B-complex can help you out lowering down your stress levels, there's also some shampoos ...


3

More than a year has passed. This is what eventually worked for me: isometric exercises with tennis balls. I built up slowly each third day, from two to four sets of five to ten "reps", where a "rep" here means five seconds squeezing hard a tennis ball in each hand. I recommend that approach to anyone in the same situation as me. Maybe it worked well ...


3

As a 50+ athlete, I can tell you that gains are still possible. However, they are harder to achieve and less frequent. It's just part of the aging process. That doesn't mean you can't train with gains in mind. You just need to train smarter.


3

I hurt my back in a football injury in 8th grade. Speared right in the middle of lower back. Was out a few days and have now had the exact same problem that you have for the past 20 years. My family has pictures of me stretching out and dying in lines at DisneyWorld because I wasn't able to workout on vacation. Why do you feel better? Blood flow and ...


3

To answer your question directly, yes. In broad terms, our ability to thermo-regulate diminishes with (older) age. This is the consequence of our reduced ability to sweat and to modulate skin blood flow. The existing research generally refers to individuals above the age of 60, however, and there presently seems to be no data on the subject for younger ...


3

It could be partly related to resource conservation. For example, if your body waits for activity in a particular muscle group to cue the growth of those muscles, it doesn't waste calories building muscle mass in excess of the strength that you actually need, which would be particularly important in times of scarcity. Another hypothesis, perhaps better ...


3

I think you're barking up the right tree: The body is made of many different chemicals, so logically some parts will wear faster than others. And the body can try to repair some parts, but not others (no new eyeballs, for example). Following, certain exercises might be good for certain body parts while be arguably bad for others. And the degree of exercise ...


2

It is beneficial to delay the weight increase you would otherwise get with aging, since the set point weight would increase. For instance, if you are 75kg at age 20 and that is a "good" weight, if you increase to obese 85kg at age 30, you are in a worse position than if you had exercised more and only increased to 80kg.


2

This study/article from the Stanford School of Medicine looks at older runners over almost twenty years. It shows that: Elderly runners have fewer disabilities, a longer span of active life and are half as likely as aging nonrunners to die early deaths ... Here's a paragraph that explains the methodology of the study: Fries’ team began tracking 538 ...


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