19

Any conversation that doesn't directly address the overarching signifigance of your diet and nutrition would be incorrect. It is far easier to not eat 200 calories than it is to burn them off. As an example, a 6 minute mile will burn (for a 180lb person) roughly 190 calories: that's a tremendous amount of work for relatively a relatively small caloric drain. ...


11

I've used this illustration in a previous answer, and it really does a good job of demonstrating the idea: The things we care about on the illustration (in relation to your question) are the sarcoplasm and the myofibril. The myofibril is the part of the muscle that actually does the contraction, where the sarcoplasm is the part of the muscle that stores ...


9

The body uses two different energy systems to fuel the body’s activity or exercise. Anaerobic - First the body uses the anaerobic system which has energy ready to go as soon as you start to use your muscles. Anaerobic means without oxygen. Aerobic - The second energy system, the aerobic system, kicks in when your short term, initial energy from the ...


7

Any kind of training can produce increases in muscle mass. Aerobic training simply stops doing so very quickly, since it doesn't require much strength to perform. Aerobic training requires a small degree of strength repeated over a relatively long period of time. The body is more stressed by the requirements of repeating the exercise over a period of time ...


5

Actually, you should do both types of training without expecting to spot reduce. You can't direct your body to draw fat from a specific location for energy. Losing weight healthfully takes time. If what you tried has not been working, mix things up. Add some weight training to your workouts. The idea is to try and burn more calories than you consume, ...


4

The following formula should allow you to convert between MET, vVo2Max, VO2Max, KCal/min: MET = vVO2Max = VO2Max / 3.5 ~= kCalBurnt / (bodyMassKg * timePerformingHours) Kcal/Min ~= 5 * bodyMassKg * VO2 / 1000 VO2 ~= (currentHeartRate / MaxHeartRate) * VO2Max MaxHeartRate ~= 210 - (0.8 * ageYears) ...


4

I'm going to assume that your two goals are: Improve your performance Stay healthy and uninjured I'm also going to assume that you are healthy and cleared for intense activity. If you are wanting to increase your anaerobic fitness, you are going to need to do intervals. In this case, I'd recommend all-out intervals; they will place a significant load on ...


4

Here is an explanatory paragraph from what is apparently Steve's original site: To help further explain this, I'll give some examples using hypothetical lactate values. If athlete A before he starts training for the mile has an anaerobic capacity of 16.0mmol (his max lactate value) and a LT pace of 5 minutes per mile, then he trains using high amounts of ...


4

The situation is a bit tricky. Every exercise leads to muscle increase, but only in that amount that is needed to handle the situation. Sprinters need a lot of strength in legs, so their leg muscles are growing bigger. So with mountain runners. Marathon runners don't need a lot of strength, they need endurance. In theory, you can have both, marathoner's ...


4

Muscle "pump" is nothing more than increased blood flow into a muscle from exertion. If you have a higher pump sensation than usual, then I'd look at something else as the cause. More caffeine or salt than usual, dehydration, other factors that would contribute to this.


4

In my opinion (especially since it is my answer you linked above) :), the 220-age should never really be used. There is a better generic formula (See the bolded parts of the study conclusion below), and there are also cohort (group) specific formula that may be available that are more accurate. This is a study review of the science behind the 220-age ...


4

It really depends on your goals and what you're looking to get out of exercise. If you're looking to fit some quick workouts in throughout the week to lose weight/ build a little muscle then HIIT is fine and you don't need to be training different systems. If you're looking to improve cardiovascular endurance and optimize your body's use of fat for fuel ...


3

If your goal is health and you only train this way 2-3 times a week this is probably the most effective approach. The Norwegian Cardiac Exercise Research Group "aim to define optimal exercise programs for “most people” in order to increase the likelihood of developing and preserving good health throughout life". They advocate 4x4 interval training which in ...


3

In addition to the points made above, HIIT also has the added benefit of EPOC to recover from oxygen deficit during the anaerobic "sprinting" stage. That can increase your metabolic rate up to 13% for up to 48 hours (decreasing over time). The optimal way to lose fat is a good combination of aerobic, anaerobic, and HIIT exercises. HIIT will give you the ...


2

The two previous answers detail two DIFFERENT workout protocols. Answer # 1 details HIIT, which is High Intensity Interval Training and as answer # 1 suggests the "interval" is necessary for this to be considered HIIT. To achieve HIIT, train 90 - 100% of your maximum capacity (not your MHR which is really only a guideline and does NOT necessarily measure ...


2

Your machine is incorrect. Anaerobic literally means "without oxygen". It is impossible for you to be spending 19 minutes of a 25 minute workout without oxygen. Anaerobic lasts anywhere from 10-30 seconds normally. I would suspect that somewhere in the algorithm where it compares resting and "max" heart rate it thinks that because of an elevated ...


2

Forgive me if I'm off some here as I'm diving way back in my memory bank, but this is what I remember from my exercise physiology classes. The two main times you want to be careful with this are, When the person is highly trained When the person is older Lance Armstrong was heavily studied in his heyday: Improved muscular efficiency displayed as Tour de ...


2

I think you should take a look at your work capacity. Here's a great article about work capacity from StrongerByScience and I suggest giving it a read overall. Their definition of work capacity is: [The] total amount of work you can perform, recover from, and adapt positively to. Your total volume scheme is a bit all over the place 2-20 (40 reps), 3-15 (...


2

A quick answer but this is what really determines the quality of a workout: Anaerobic alactic: work-rest ratio 1:10 Example. For each 10 seconds of sprints rest 2 minutes after Anaerobic lactic: work-rest interval 1:2 Example.. weightlifting for 30 seconds and resting a minute. You more commonly see 60 seconds accompanied with 2 minutes rest. Aerobic. ...


1

Sprinting Sprinting is the best way to achieve your body's full capacity and work yourself the hardest. It can also be done outside or on a track so if your gym doesn't have a track you can go outside and do it. Here are some other examples that require equipment but are in many gyms: Jump rope (speed or double unders) Box jumps(speed or height can be added)...


1

The most basic definition of the Anaerobic Threshold is where the body generates more lactic acid than it can flush out. So if you were to make a line graph in which one line represents the rate lactic acid increase and the other line represents the rate of lactic acid decrease, the point at which the lines cross would technically be the "anaerobic threshold"...


1

Should my unhealthy eating day be on a day I lift or not? As I have previously answered, meal timing isn't important, generally you should view you food intake as a weekly (overall) thing and don't bother trying to micromanage it on a daily/hourly basis. From a practicality perspective you should look at what effect food has on your workout. I personally ...


1

First and foremost: personally, anaerobic and aerobic exercises can't have the same intensity. Swimming is aerobic. Anaerobic exercises are pretty much the hardest exercises since they push your heart to its limits most of the times. Anaerobic exercise is defined as short duration, high intensity exercise lasting anywhere from merely seconds up to ...


1

Part of the difference that you are noting is genetic; some people are naturally better at aerobic sports, and some are better at putting muscle on. In running for example, you don't see sprinters become marathoners, nor do you see marathoners become sprinters, no matter how hard they train. They don't have the genetics for it. For a given person, however, ...


1

Aerobic means you're burning fatty acids as your primary fuel source, along side oxygen and small amounts of ATP in the muscle's. Anaerobic means you're burning ATP, and Oxygen as your primary fuel source. The latter being limited but more explosive in muscle contractions than the former.


1

Afterburn is the layman's term for EPOC, or Excess Post exercise Oxygen Consumption. EPOC is your body converting from higher yield energy systems back to lower yield energy systems. Think of your energy systems as a series of dimmer switches-you can't turn any of them off completely, so they're running all the time, but you can tweak the settings. Now ...


1

Do I lose muscle mass if I do anaerobic exercises throughout my diet? Not necessarily. In fact, typical anaerobic exercises that use your muscle, such as lifting weights as you mention in your question actually helps to preserve the muscle. It's a signal to your body that you need that muscle. You lose muscle when you don't eat enough protein and other ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible