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Jim Bathurst, known for his web site Beast Skills, says in his human flag tutorial: If you can do several full range handstand pushups against the wall, then you’re well on your way to getting the flag. Overcoming Gravity, a popular book on gymnastic training for adults, has a chart comparing the difficulty of various skills. In the chart, a full human ...


8

I was really into powerlifting but due to this pandemic I can't go to the gym anymore. So I started doing calisthenics/bodyweight exercise, for me the most useful exercise are these: pull ups: perform them controlled with full range of motion, then chin over the bar and arms fully extended when you descend. This exercise will mainly work your back and your ...


4

In my opinion (especially since it is my answer you linked above) :), the 220-age should never really be used. There is a better generic formula (See the bolded parts of the study conclusion below), and there are also cohort (group) specific formula that may be available that are more accurate. This is a study review of the science behind the 220-age ...


4

If you donate blood: No sport the day you are donating, neither before nor after You need to replace the lost fluids. Drink a lot before and after donating For replacing the blood cells you don't need so much energy but iron, keep that in mind especially if you are female or vegetarian Your stamina will suffer the most, keep endurance exercise on a lower ...


3

Christian's answer is good for blood donations. While I haven't donated in over a decade, my understanding is that there hasn't been many changes in the taking of plasma. When one donates plasma, they filter out the plasma and return everything else so you aren't losing any red blood cells. Then in the end, they pump in a bag of saline to help replenish the ...


3

Most effective exercises are the ones you can stick to! I am not a professional. I like to keep it simple and say that push-up is the best exercise. The 30-day push-up challenge is a thing because it is so simple. Here are other exercises I like: Squats: you will probably need weights (won't be a bodyweight workout) Running: it will stress your joints if ...


3

As I guess you are a novice in strength training I would suggest to start with a full-body workout, this means that in a session you try to train as much different muscles as possible. I found that this was more fun and easier to stick to than a split schedule which requires more time and dedication. As you tagged your post with strength-training, this ...


3

As the other answer suggests, the idea of a "finisher" is just to maximize the output of your workout by pushing the muscles to more complete failure. Remember that building muscle is about making your brain recognise that your strength isn't sufficient to cope with the demand you are placing on it, therefore it triggers muscle growth so that next time you ...


3

Actually some of these terms are coined by just normal people. Training is training. However, due to some people getting sick of doing same things all the time, others tried to put other names or ways to get the training. Everything tries to make you go to failure eventually. So, you can do this the "high intensity way", which is doing the reps slowly. You ...


3

Vertical jumps are all about power and explosiveness. The traditional slow, pick it up and put it down will improve some just due to the extra muscle mass and power, but you will be losing something if you don't cover the explosiveness. Additionally, if you aren't flexible in the hip flexor area (the muscles that drive the knee upwards), then you can inhibit ...


3

here is a piece of an article I read on your question. "The performance-enhancing effects of nicotine included increased "vigilance and cognitive function" and "reduced stress and body weight", the laboratory reported after a year-long study published by the Forensic Science International journal." link to this article is as follows http://www.foxsports.com....


3

Fish oil is a fairly common supplement in the fitness world, up there with protein powders and creatine. But similar to those other two, the effects are slight and not really detectable day-to-day. Fish oils are being studied constantly, and at best they get a marginal stamp of approval. I don't think anyone (beyond supplement sales folks) are going to say ...


3

There are two big mistakes that most amateur runners make. They go too hard on their easy days, and not hard enough on their hard days. This usually means they don't get as much out of their speedwork as they could, and they don't go easy enough to really get a good recovery. For the average runner targeting a 5k, they can usually get by with 30ish miles a ...


3

A proper back squat uses a (roughly) shoulder-width stance with toes angled slightly out, which facilitates abduction ("angling out") of the femurs during the movement. Yes, this does use the hips/glutes; this is desirable (not "cheating"!) because it allows us to train more muscle mass. It also prevents impingement of tissues between the femur and the ...


2

It seems inherently strange that stretching may offer no proven benefit. Unless something has drastically changed since PT school, the research I've seen and what the professional consensuses seems to be support is mixed. One big issue in PT performance based studies has always been sample size. So that alone make's it difficult to generalize any ...


2

One last attempt. Hopefully this article helps. It’s the runner’s biggest question and worst fear: how quickly can I get out of shape? After putting in hours of training and hundreds of miles, most athletes worry it will all go to waste if they stop. That’s only partially true. Unfortunately, plenty of hard-earned fitness can go away within two weeks. ...


2

Here's an article from Greg Knuckols entitled "Avoiding Cardio Could Be Holding You Back" and another from Juggernaut Training entitled "Conditioning: How To Do It Right" Combined there's easily maybe 20 pages of material to shift through, but the TLDR version is: Lifting weights requires energy. The better you get at weights, the more weights you have to ...


2

Its all about conditioning. You have not stated for how long have you been cycling and am assuming not very long. The person you mentioned might also have sub 50 resting heart rate while yours would be in 70-90 range. Once you keep performing the same exercise over a period of time, your body/heart becomes very efficient in doing so. Basically the same 40 ...


2

Forgive me if I'm off some here as I'm diving way back in my memory bank, but this is what I remember from my exercise physiology classes. The two main times you want to be careful with this are, When the person is highly trained When the person is older Lance Armstrong was heavily studied in his heyday: Improved muscular efficiency displayed as Tour de ...


2

I think that you're running into one of the limitations of an overly simplistic model like "80/20". Note that I'm not saying the idea behind it is bad, but the way it's being conveyed loses much of the nuance. To speak to what I believe to be the spirit of the model, don't stress about the distance or time per se. Rather make 20% of your runs be ...


1

These are the most effective bodyweight exercises for getting a body like you want: hanging (better for lower abs) or dips-position (better for serratus) leg raises, 4x8 up to 90° with bodyweight, move to 4x12 when you're strong enough, you can do then do toes-to-bar which is harder. You can also do similar rep ranges with weight in between your feet when ...


1

It's situational, the average person need not worry about anything more than weight within a healthy BMI range. A gym-goer, athlete, or otherwise active person won't typically need anything more than weight and bodyfat percentage. An elderly person might need to track bone density, a sick person might need to track their water, etc. Tracking biometrics just ...


1

Few principles at play here. I'll keep it in simple English to make this as useful as possible. Before that, yes your muscles are rested and ready to perform better. Doing physical effort for long periods of time is good to maintain your musculature but it won't directly help your sport. It basically means that the negative effect of time you spent off from ...


1

It's not going to be a huge issue if you bump up your training to 50 miles a week, you should still see some general improvements across your races. It's a tricky question asking only if the running will lead to increases without factoring wider concerns, such as different types of training, diet, and to some extent rest/sleep. And what constitutes a ...


1

Why not juices and smoothies? Juices are probably what you're looking for since juicing will remove a lot of the fiber from a vegetable combo and allow you to get the concentrated nutrition as well as carbs without filling you up. For smoothies maybe use almond milk home made or store bought as your smoothie base. Then add fruit, like berries, apples, ...


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