19

I am a programmer myself and often spend about 10-13 hours a day in a chair and had similar problems. My solution - a full body 20 minute workout everyday, with emphasis on more 'active' physical activities for your back and legs. For example - no bench exercises - do a lot of reps of bur-pees, dead-lifts, upper push ups with lightweight dumbbells, and pull ...


7

Thanks for providing the information about your workout. I agree with @Informaficker that the best way to deal with a back problem is to seek professional expertise. Lots of people have back pain and lots have advice about what worked for them. However, all back pain is not alike and there are many contributing factors, so treat your condition as unique. ...


7

There can be many reasons for muscle spasms/pulls in the neck area, including (in no particular order): Insufficient food: the muscles lack the glycogen stores required and overcompensate Insufficient sleep: your nervous system is impacted when you are in a sleep deprived state, and I've had most of the neck spasm issues when in this state Bad hydration: ...


7

First you need to realise that sitting all the time is not just bad for your back, but also bad for your learning. Break the learning into chunks of about 20min. Use the breaks for exercise. This should actually help you with learning, so don't even get the idea that you have to add the "lost time" at the end. Depending on your current fitness level a ...


6

Don't Sit All Day Sitting hunched over a desk or laptop all day is not good for you. At a minimum, take regular breaks throughout the day: walk around the building, get some water, stretch your arms, roll out your neck and ankles, do a few lunges, sit in a third world squat for thirty seconds: Configure a standing desk, but don't stand all day either: ...


6

This has happened to me a lot over the years. I found it was caused by tightness of the levator scapulae and middle and upper trapezius and a weak lower trapezius and serratus. All largely sorted through fixing muscular imbalances, using a mixture of self myofascial release and targeted resistance work on the weak areas. Release tension in pec major/minor, ...


6

It is smart to look at fitness when you are young with an eye on preventing problems as you age. Back pain can have multiple causes. Some of the causes stem from degenerative changes of the joints, restrictions in the soft tissues (muscle and fascia), protective muscle spasms, disc degeneration and/or prolapse, and osteoporosis (weakening or thinning of ...


6

Yoga's cat pose is perfect for this. 2 minutes of it before going to sleep. And then 2 minutes of extended cat's pose with stretching opposing arm and leg. Another exercise is pull-ups (or just hang from something by your hands), letting the weight of your lower body to stretch the space between the lumbar discs in your lower spine. Rotate and wiggle a bit....


6

I'm a web developer, and I have to work for more than 10 hours a day. So in my opinion the best thing to do for any desk job or long periods of studying is taking small breaks, like 5 minutes every 1 hour or so to do some dynamic stretching or moving in general. For example in my case, I take a quick walk arround, a little stretching especially for my back, ...


6

Firstly, imaging, such as x-rays and MRIs, to determine the cause of lower back pain is problematic because asymptomatic people tend to have all kinds of spinal degenerations which don't actually cause any problems, with a prevalence of approximately 70% of individuals younger than 50 years of age to >90% of individuals older than 50 years of age.(1) This ...


5

I have had several friends who have lost significant (75 pounds) by doing the paleo diet alone and didn't exercise due to medical conditions. Paleo Diet Lifestyle is a good website to get started. As for exercising, what exactly is your disc problem? I am not a physical therapist, but as a nurse, I would recommend doing whatever kind of exercise you can ...


5

Stretch it. Toe touches and forward bends are a great way to stretch the back out. There are also a ton of Yoga poses that can help you stretch your back in various ways (I recommend checking out yoga.about.com, which has a ton of poses that you can filter by anatomy). You can do these before, during, and after the concert to help your back feel better. ...


5

Your Lower back Pain seems to emerge from you studying too much, which means that you don't have a correct posture or proper seat with support. Although you can alleviate the pain, i recommend checking in your posture to prevent future problems such as chronic back pains. Exercise increases blood flow and boosts muscle activity , hence alleviating pain. You ...


5

If you feel sharp pain in the lower back, then you need to adjust the exercise. The reason why lying leg raises are often painful, is that the lower back gets pinched and compressed as the weight of the legs tilts the hip and pulls the lower back upwards. The main leg lifting muscle is the psoas major, which connects your thigh bone directly to your spine. ...


4

Planks! As long as you have proper form they are very good at building strength for your core without having to do crunches.


4

You mention that you do push ups, but do you do any pull-ups or inverse rows? Typically, it's not uncommon to have Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) due to changing the intensity (weight) or volume (sets * reps). At first glance it sounded like this may be your problem. The DOMS can be quite intense and last for a few days if you really worked things ...


4

Their answers hold weight... I've noticed the pull or tear when the weight was a little heavy or a lot heavy. Also every time you actually move your head forward or look down to do the weight, it's possible to strain or tear it. Keep good posture, eyes forward and head straight. Stabilize or don't use your neck while moving the weight.


4

Your focus isn’t to train the upper / mid / lower abs -- crunches only target the rectus abdominis. In addition, crunches places unnecessary strain on your back, which would explain the LBP. Try to think of your core as layers rather than sections. The core and low back muscles work together. The transverse abdominis (TrA) is the first muscle that fires ...


4

This article from Business Insider talks about a study that concluded that 52 minutes of work followed by a 17 minute break was the work cadence that the participants' best employees used. You can use whatever cadence you like, but the core principle -- from both a physical and mental fitness perspective -- is to get up and move every hour. If that's a ...


3

It may be a little late now, but I think the pain is in your rotator cuff, which can lead to injuries. I had the same pain, exactly as you mentioned but an easy fix will prevent/stop this pain. Keep your elbows tucked as close to your body as possible while doing a press up. Think of pushing through your armpit as you push up, making sure your elbows don't ...


3

Being in shape helps prevent back pain. Being out of shape, overweight, and inactive all contribute to the problem. I would lift weights at least two or three times a week, focusing on barbell squats and deadlifts, which are both tremendously helpful for strengthening the back. Yoga, going for a medium-long walk, or another form of stretching that you enjoy ...


3

Technique is important for the deadlift. My personal experience is that it is too easy to add weights and once you get above your body weight, small errors increase the chance of back injuries. For the correct posture and technique, see this OP Physcial Fitness: What is the correct form for deadlift? and this two videos: Deadlift set-up and Deadlift back ...


3

The fact your back is stiff and painful in the morning suggests inflammation as this builds as we sleep for a number of reasons. Combined with the fact you find extension of the back releaving and have most probably been compressing your lower back when weight training, I would suggest it is most likely an annular strain or tear of your intervertebral disc. ...


3

I recommend reading the information at the National Insititute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases A part of their website that sticks out to me is: Can Back Pain Be Prevented? One of the best things you can do to prevent back pain is to exercise regularly and keep your back muscles strong. Four specific types of exercises are ...


3

Wearing raised heel shoes and running with a form that lands on the heel first can aggravate your back. I am a software developer also (for 30+ years) and, in 2009, was 85 pounds overweight and walked with a cane due to a hyper mobile lumbar disc. An article by Dr. Rossi led me to suspect my footwear was a contributor to my problem. I switched to Vibram ...


3

I have a similar problem that was waking me up from sleep because of thepain, yet I could walk reasonably ok. The Chiro popped it in place which brought some relief, but it lasted less than two days. Doing a bit of research, I found that the best way for me to pop the hip back is actuall very simple. Lie flat on your back with arms spread wide. Legs ...


3

If your current fitness/strength level is low, then my suspicion is that you are experiencing muscle cramps due to increased demands. There are a few things I would suggest for rehab: First, deal with the cramping. Yes, massage works, and many massage therapists have special oils that really help the muscles to relax. If you can't afford the massage ...


3

I have had back issues my whole life - mainly lower back. When I was lifting heavy, squats and deadlifts threw me fits. You getting close to about double your weight. This is where it gets a bit tricky for some. What surprises me is that you are not having the same back issues squatting. I think you need to take a step back here and think long-term ...


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