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Octagonal plates interfere with proper strength training Octagonal plates have no reason to exist, and are actively counterproductive to working out properly. Octagonal or otherwise non-round plates make many fundamental barbell exercises from the floor--including cleans, snatches, and most importantly deadlifts--awkward. Upon putting plates down, the bar ...


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The barbell row really is a terrific exercise right up until (for me) you start going over your bodyweight. So if you're 180lb, having 180lb's of bar+plates tends to be pretty heavy primarily because you're probably already doing a lot of other lower back exercises. A big advantage to barbell lifts (vs bodyweight) is that you can incrementally change your ...


3

I wouldn't sweat the difference in weights you can do on one versus the other, there can be a lot of good reasons for that. The angles, range of motion, and muscle involvement all shift. On heavy barbell rows, despite your best efforts, your chest will drop a bit to meet the bar. On the lever machine, you can't get away with that. On a pure row, the weight ...


3

yes it does leave out the lower back, hips and hamstrings you use to help generate power resulting in far less weight used BUT... you get more stimulation on the target areas like the middle traps and lats no you have not Simply put if you want to gain lots of mass in your genral back then go with the pendaly or normal bent over rows but if you want to ...


3

The barbell row is a beast. It depends how you are executing them. Are you stretching the back when you let the barbell down? By that I mean you should use the full range of motion. I would recommend the following: try to maintain a near 90° angle with your torso let the arms fully extend and your shoulder blades too... use a grip-width as you would do a ...


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It's easy to make the argument that a plate has only one requirement: to weigh a certain amount. However, round plates enable a range of exercises that are impractical with any weight that has straight edges. Any floor exercise: i.e. rows, deadlifts, cleans Any exercise that requires rolling: i.e. barbell ab rollouts The difference is significant enough ...


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I will try to add additional information. Maybe these are not your cases, but it might help someone who has these problems and probably will allow you to think outside the box and will give an interesting direction to your thought. Do not think that everything goes down to reps, counting weight, eating right, etc. When you want to go to the max, you need to ...


2

If you check out EXRX's muscle activation list on the bent-over barbell row, you'll note that the dozen or so muscles that make up the bicep and forearm are syngerists and dynamic stabilizers: not prime movers. So while your arms are certainly involved in the lift, they are hardly the prime movers. Even if you flip to an underhand grip on your barbell ...


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"Glenn Pendlay said, all Barbell Rows should be Pendlay Rows because it’s more effective." Upper-back: You must pull your shoulder-blades back at the top to get the bar to your chest. This works your broadest back muscle that give you a v-shape: your lats ((latisimus dorsi). It also works your traps, rear shoulders and all the small muscles of your ...


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You basically answered your own question in the question, but since no one else has chimed in, I'll throw in $.02. I would not advise that someone actively shrugs their shoulders during a traditional barbell bent over row. If anything, I'd retract and set the traps and rear delts (similar to a bench press set up) in order to take the slack out and allow a ...


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We need to talk about what shoulder rotation actually is, because none of the provided images are accurately representing it, and it isn't really even possible to achieve internal rotation during a barbell row. Shoulder rotation is the rotation of the humerus. It can be most obviously seen when the elbows are bent at 90°, because then shoulder rotation will ...


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Do you have very tight chest and lat muscles? These are the 2 main internal rotators of your shoulder. You can try stretching those while strengthening your external rotators. I’m guessing what the image meant by internal rotation is referring to an anterior tilt of the scapula. Engaging lower traps may be difficult if there is a lack of strength to combat ...


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I'd say, yes, certainly, broader muscle group exercise can be negatively impacted by weak stabilizers. I injured my shoulder reaching for a volleyball swing years ago, and assumed it was a rotator cuff injury. After a couple years of not being able to fully throw a ball or spike a volleyball, I saw a physical therapist, who identified it as scapular ...


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Wide grip barbell row is totally fine, if done with correct technique of course. Here are instructions on correct technique: https://www.muscleandfitness.com/exercise/workouts/back-exercises/pronated-wide-grip-bentover-barbell-row/ Note: you may need to lighten the weight compared to narrow grip barbell rows as wide grip focuses more on upper back muscles.


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The difference between the attachments essentially comes down to three (3) factors: the degree of lateral versus horizontal extension/abduction, the range of motion possible, and the dominance of the elbow flexors due to the degree of pronation/supination of the wrists. Both the v-bar and rope restrict humeral extension almost entirely to the sagittal ...


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Potentially gripping too wide, however if this does not cause any pain or discomfort it is likely not going to affect your wrists (but best to sort it out now). It could just be potentially your form but you would have to check this online. If you watch a form video you can see whether your form is similar and also see the wrists and grip.


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Yes. It's possible to have big imbalances like this. Particularly as a beginner. There are a few reasons that can cause it. You're over compensating in some way on the stronger lift. In the case of the row, you could be hitching the bar up on each rep. In essence, "cheating" by creating momentum so you can get the bar up. You may not even be aware you're ...


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Grip placement in any type of pulling exercise affects which muscles will be most activated. A breif overview of Grips : Supinated (palms up)- Biceps will have more activation Pronated (palms down) - Less Bicep activation, More focus on the Lats Neutral (palms facing each other) - A middle ground (also your best bet if the other grips are hurting your ...


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No, there is a fundamental difference between the Pendlay row and the bent-over barbell row. Neither of which, if you execute proper form, put your shoulders in a position to impinge. The Pendlay Row has your torso, more or less, parallel with the ground and you pull the bar to your sternum (or just below) from the ground. You can pull a barbell to ...


1

If you watch the animation that you posted closely, I think you'll see two important adjustments to consider. First, make sure that the seat is correctly placed to target the lats. You'll notice in that animation that the top of the chest pad is at the top of the chest. That's a good guide for adjusting the seat. You don't want the seat too high or too ...


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In case barbell rows are one of your main lifts for overall body strength reinforcing your weak links is always a good choice. When the barbell rows are seen as mere accessory lifts they are quite useless for various reason: Simple dumbbell rows allow for more shoulder freedom and more weight, above of that cheating on dumbbell rows is perfectly safe ...


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I started today a new inverted row cycle by lowering one step the bar and trying 3x3 and failed. It is simply too hard. Going back by raising the bar a step and 3x15 makes not much sense, I think, since I am already able to do that I think the training variables you can control are intensity, volume, and muscles worked. Since increasing the intensity (and ...


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Since upright rows stress the traps and the shoulders, I would switch to using barbell or dumbbell shrugs. Your shoulders won't get as much work, but, if done correctly, the traps should benefit. Additionally, either exercise should reduce any strain on your wrists.


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I might be stating the obvious here, but a two dumbbell bent over row is safe as long as you don't drop the dumbbells on your feet! As long as you lift within your abilities, and use good technique you will be fine. Drop your pride and go light until you get the feel for it, and build from there. Go slow and pay attention to your toes! I find dumbbell ...


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For other people experiencing this same issue who can't or don't want to receive help from a personal trainer - I was experiencing the same issue after squats - a sharp lower back pain that seemed to get worse if I drove for long periods of time or sat down at work all day. The thing that has helped me the most is stretching or rolling out my hip flexors ...


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Upper lower imbalance It's actually quite common on stronglifts/starting strength/etc Few factors at play here. You are consistently doing a heavy lower body lift first every single workout. The first exercise you do in a workout when you're fresh will tend to be the most effective. For some that means that latter exercises progress slowly because they ...


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