7

It sounds like you're off to a great start with minimalist shoes. The first rule is to start slow and increase usage gradually, and you have done so. The shoes Make sure the shoes fit perfectly. You can get blisters and pain in minimalist shoes pretty easily, especially on long runs, if they don't fit perfectly or you're not wearing them correctly. Also, ...


7

I actually run in vibrams, and when I first began my calves were extremely sore for the first week or two. I think this is due mostly to the fact barefoot running forces people to run as nature intended, on the ball of the foot, causing the calf to work harder in order to support the weight. This would also put more tension on the Achilles tendon since it ...


6

Absolutely do not heel strike. It's not necessary, and you won't want to do it anyway because it will be painful. When you run on clean asphalt with proper form, it should be quite comfortable and you generally should not get blisters or excessive wear on your feet. If you start with half a mile to a mile max barefoot in the first week and gradually ...


6

I'm also going to disagree with Kneel-Before-ZOD. There's nothing wrong with running completely barefoot outdoors. You just need to look where you're running, stay relaxed, and run properly. Regardless of whether you're running actually barefoot or with minimal shoes, the keys to remember are: Shorten your stride. Traditional running shoes make it easy to ...


5

Calf tenderness is a common occurrence with barefoot/minimalist running. The achilles is in the back of the leg, from the knee to the back of the heel. It is NOT a shock absorber, but is a stabilizing muscle and propulsing muscle. It works harder when one runs barefoot. Barefoot running is something that needs to be very gradually introduced into a ...


5

I have extremely flat feet and have been barefoot running several years, usually on dirt trails. Although I can't say that the flatness has been affected, I do notice less soreness and faster recovery than when I ran with shoes. At one point I had trained up to three miles at a stretch, then tried a ten mile race on pavement, which gave me sore achilles and ...


5

I've been doing some barefoot running on pavement as a way to help with flat feet and pronation. For awhile I tried to increasing the distance but then I started to feel some minor aches under my foot and on the outside of my ankle. My biggest fear was developing a stress fracture so I've since limited the barefoot run to 5 or 10 minutes as a warm up and ...


4

I got the opposite effect: barefoot running is awesome and I prefer it, but it builds up my calves and can temporarily make them quite tight. Squats require a mobile calf and ankle. It may help with ankle stability and I wouldn't avoid barefoot running for this reason, but I don't think it helps with my squats.


4

I found that running minimalist/barefoot corrected my running form pretty quickly and naturally without any special effort on my part. You body just won't let you slam your heel into the ground like you can when you're wearing regular shoes. If you do, you'll feel the bone-jolt all the way up your body and it will shake your fillings loose! Also, running ...


3

There's no universal cap on barefoot running. People do ultramarathons barefoot, and marathons that are entirely on asphalt. But pretty much any source on barefoot/minimalist running advice is going to tell you to ease into it to build up the strength in your feet. If doing more than 10k causes you pain, listen to your body and keep it to shorter runs for ...


3

You say that you've started running barefoot, how recently? If it's very recent, your feet are not accustomed to that sort of serious strain. No callouses have been built up, they're as soft as a baby's because of the foot coffins we wear all day long. Start out slow, work up to the distance you can normally run while wearing shoes. Consider this a 'new ...


3

I've tried barefoot running on concrete. I restricted myself to 5-6 kms distances. I didn't get any blisters though - maybe because I'm used to walking barefooted outdoors. However, one time, I did get a very painful puncture wound from sharp gravel or wood. Make sure you run on clean surfaces devoid of any debris. You can also get ultra-minimalistic running ...


3

Running on soft surfaces helps strengthen feet muscles and tendons and that's why it is considered highly beneficial by some podiatrists (given that weak feet are one of the main causes of fallen arches) What's more, a part of the essential foot stretches for flat feet includes gripping objects and stretching your feet over them so you can see how running on ...


3

I have very flat feet, and i have started barefoot/VFF running a couple of years ago. I have no problems running 10-15 miles on concrete and or pavement. In fact, it is easier for me after the winter, when my feet get tender and feel all those little rocks and roots too much. I may carry my VFFs or Altra Adams in my fanny pack in case the surface gets too ...


3

Short answer: I would agree with your doctor's assessment unless you already have healthy, strong feet. These would probably be able to take (and perhaps even profit from) hard concrete surfaces. If your feet are not in their best of health, do foot strengthening exercises, and/or walk on softer, natural, rugged surfaces to get your feet into shape first. ...


3

No, it will not go away. Unless you do something about it. Since you've been running in Vibrams for "quite a while" your feet should have adapted by now, and you should be able to run without pain in your feet. The muscles in your feet should have gained enough strength after 4-8 weeks. The joints, connective tissue, and tendons might well take longer; ½-1 ...


3

No, I doubt that running with every footwear is safe. Of course this depends on the level of training you have with that specific footwear, but in general I would not recommend running in high-heels, clown shoes or diving fins. And while you probably can run in slippers or flip-flops I wouldn't recommend that either. The footwear is not made to hold on to ...


3

The 5 weeks have passed, so you probably already have completed your half marathon :-), but here goes: There are a lot of things you're not telling, so my answer is based on what info you do provide. As a rule of thumb, you can (within reasonable limit, of course) run twice the distance you think you can run, and since you know you can run 12 km, a half ...


3

To make the transition you need to slowly incorporate minimalist shoes or you'll injure yourself. Even just walking. Your body will need time to adjust to forefoot striking. Its not like just buying another pair of padded sneakers. My first pair of Minimalist shoes are the New Balance Minimus Trails. The 10v2 model. True minimalist shoes have no heel to toe ...


3

The posterior tibialis controls pronation but the actual “foot roll” comes at the end of a very long kinetic chain. Each running step is initiated (or should be) in the glute and travels through the leg. The pronation could be caused by any sequence of weaknesses in the kinetic chain. For many runners (and non-runners), weak glutes can cause a plethora of ...


2

I've been trying minimalist ("barefoot") running for about 1 year now, using Vibram FiveFingers. My reasons for trying it was that I was fed up with injuries, and constantly buying more expensive shoes with more cushioning. And when a physiotherapist wanted me to buy insoles in addition to the thick shock absorbance in my running shoes, I had enough. I don'...


2

I recently made the swap to Minimalist shoes adapting forefoot running. I had tried swapping my shoes for 4-6 hours at a time to start out with at work, since I walk all day long at work. That week was the worst because I had pushed myself too hard since I was so eager. My knees, shins, heels all screamed at me to knock it off. I took a step back into my ...


2

Had a very very similar injury. Was running for months in the Vibrams and then all of a sudden had similar pain. Probably because I increased the mileage too fast week to week, from about 20 to then 25mi/week. Diagnosis ended up being an inflammation and to just rest and take prednisolone (pill form) for 2 weeks. Almost no improvement in 4-5 days, and ...


2

If you're running short distances I don't think it'll be much of a problem, especially if you can choose your route. Where it's really a problem is if you're running a long distance race with a fixed course and you're forced to deal with a slant on the path that only goes in one direction - that's hell on the ankles, knees, hips, and well everything. That's ...


2

It sounds like you have a lot more running experience than I do, but it seems logical that there are really only two ways you can go here: Negotiate with yourself and buy a barefoot shoe like Vibram FiveFingers Just keep running until you blister over. When I was in college, I knew a guy that walked all over campus in bare feet - even in the middle of ...


2

I ran long distances for two years in minimalist shoes, and have just now realized that yes, minimalist shoes are great for improving your form and reducing injury, but they still mask just enough of your senses to make it harder to perfect your form—specifically, running efficiently with as little impact as possible. Also, minimalist shoes need to fit quite ...


2

As an addition to what has been said already, here are some exercises that will help you: The author is a podiatrist who is also a triathlete and minimalist/ barefoot runner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRS88R1BAg8 They helped me a lot (I do 80-90% of my training in MT10)


2

I do the same minimal warmup with barefoot running, as you said, just walking and running slowly. Nothing else has to be changed, beyond that you want to increase the distance that you run at a more gradual rate until your feet have properly adapted to running without shoes.


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