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8

A difference of 0.3" (a little more than a quarter of an inch) is within acceptable measurement error on something like this. The answer to your question is: BMI does not matter for individuals A perfect example for the reason why is with the two tickets you included in your question: On Mar 4 2014 you had BF% of 16.2% and BMI 25.5 On Mar 23 2014 you ...


7

Medical Checkup The best way to convince your health insurance provider that you are in great shape is to show them the results of your physical exam showing that you pass with flying colors. Your medical doctor would be the one to determine whether or not you are healthy. BMI is a screening tool - NOT a diagnostic tool. As stated by the CDC: BMI ...


6

BMI simply measures the relationship between your weight and height and doesn't care if the weight is muscle-based or fat-based. You're focusing on the wrong thing: your body fat in the first measurement was 16.3% and it changed to 13.3% in the second. The second value fell within the range of your ideal body fat. You also lost over 2-kg in body fat, all ...


5

BMI isn't something you use to calculate your personal fitness, it is a statistical measurement and highly inaccurate for personal use. There are a lot of diets that 'speed diet' your weight down and don't care about muscle loss, what counts is the result on your scale to make them look efficient. Safe rates of weight loss are mostly determined by your fat ...


4

No, do not use BMI to gauge your fitness level. First of all, and I love pointing this out; the person who invented the BMI scale said that it should NOT be used to indicate the level of fatness in a person. Second of all, it was invented between 1830 and 1850. Our knowledge of the human body has evolved so much now, that it's a marvel that it's still ...


4

One possible explanation for the height discrepancy: consider that throughout the day, your precise height is not constant. In the morning after you wake up, you are actually slightly taller than you are in the evening when you go to bed. Another explanation is variability in posture, as well as measurement imprecision. As has been mentioned elsewhere, ...


3

A healthy bmi is between 18-24. For you, that'd be 130-170 pounds. So you have about 20 pounds to lose. http://www.neimef-research.org/resources/bmi-calculator.aspx *Note: I don't support using bmi, I commented on your question about it. Nevertheless, I'm still answering it.


3

To the best of my ability, I've not been able to find a study that thoroughly looks into this issue. However, BMI is a poor indicator in and of itself for a multitude of reasons. I'll enumerate some of them: (a) visceral fat is far worse than subcutaneous fat in terms of health. (b) too little fat is also bad for your health, but the odds of your BF% ...


3

First, your BMI is something you can safely ignore given that you have ways to determine your body fat. BMI is an easy 'statistical' tool for getting rough 'population' obesity numbers. BMI for individuals does not have a dependable relationship to obesity and/or to obesity related health issues. Your body fat percentage is what matters, and looking at that, ...


2

Fat distribution in your body is entirely linked with your genetics. In general, for men, the last/hardest area to burn fat is located on the belly, and above the hips (side of the belly). But this can really differ from one guy to another, for example: I have remaining fat on the belly, and on the whole back (top to bottom), but no fat at all on my chest,...


2

BMI is just an average target, being healthy and fit varies per person. I used to be really underweight according to BMI measurements while feeling fine and working out almost daily (cycling, running) and eating properly. I've started doing weight training about 2 years ago and gained about 20kg (44lbs) in muscle, and according to BMI I am now your average ...


2

Lose the BMI First of all, you shouldn't be looking at BMI. BMI is the relationship between your weight and height, it doesn't take into account what type of weight you're carrying (i.e. fat or muscle). I for example, have very low bodyfat (between 6-8% most of the year) yet my BMI is average because I'm very muscular which bumps my weight up. Someone who ...


2

Considerable debate surrounds what proportion of the energetic macronutrients might represent the ‘ideal’, but let us assume that you are observing a high-protein diet, providing 2.0 grams of protein per kilogram of body mass per day, and let us assume, also, that you would like to maintain a slight energy deficit in order to metabolise fat quickly whilst ...


1

One of the remarkable things about the body is that it adapts to the stimulus placed upon it. That is one reason that you see the recommendations to switch your training around 2-3 times a year. This is possibly what is happening, is that you are becoming more efficient, so seeing less gains for the same work. So lets look at changing it up. First, your ...


1

It sounds like you've hit a plateau in your weight loss, it does happen. The body seeks homeostasis, so if you don't change anything for a few months, you'll reach a point where your body is "happy" with where it is and you won't progress. Getting out of a plateau isn't usually too hard (in my experience), you just need to change things up. I would avoid ...


1

First, as a minor note, you're not seeing arteries, you're seeing veins. Hence getting more "vascular" due to shed body fat. I can almost guarantee that working out your core is not the reason for gaining 10lbs. Maybe, and that's a MASSIVE maybe, side planks led to your obliques being developed and added maybe a lbs of solid muscle which could lead to a ...


1

When people say "healthy weight", it is remarkably open for interpretation. My personal opinion, is that one should strive not just to remove as much fat as possible (because a lot of the fat types have purposes), but to remove as much visceral fat as possible. Visceral fat is the type of fat that wraps around the inner organs, and wreak havoc on your ...


1

The "how" is briefly explained in the instructions from page 14 onwards. In essence: Weight is measured; height is entered; BMI is calculated from those; body fat and water percentages, muscle and bone mass are calculated using a tiny electric current; I would guess the metabolic rates are based on average levels using all of the above plus the user's ...


1

BMI does not work well for people with significant muscle mass. Go out and get your body fat measured (DEXA or hydrostatic weighing are the best methods). That will give you another bit of data.


1

There are some other ways to calculate body fat other than the weight to height ratio or measuring waist and hip circumference. 1) Bio-electrical Impedance. This method uses a machine to send a small electrical impulse through your body. You normally have to input your Age, Gender, Height, Weight, and Physical Activity Level. The more information you put ...


1

Boris_yo, Congratulations on your transformation! You're one of the people who should frequent this site and help answer more questions. Since you've had personal experience with weight-loss, your anecdotal stories can motivate others to keep shedding the goo. Although I'm not certified qualified to give a fitness/nutrition critique, I will give some ...


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