24

The article's explanations for why you shouldn't try to squat a deadlift are wrong. Positioning your hips too low does not put more stress on the lower back, and does not meaningfully shift your centre of gravity. What it does do is position your shoulders behind the bar, meaning to maintain this position as the bar comes off the floor, your anterior ...


13

Could be: 1. The weights are actually less A gym I used to go to had two different kinds of plates: rubber coated and cast iron. Out of curiosity, some patrons of the gym brought a scale and compared the weights of all the 45 lb. plates. The cast iron plates were all about 45 lb. with small variation of ±2 lbs. So some were 43, 44, 46, and 47 but all around ...


10

It's important to keep one's legs in good working order for anyone who wants to retain the ability to get out of bed, climb stairs, stand up off the toilet, walk around a hilly neighborhood, run away from a fire or other emergency, or sit down to play with a child on the floor. People who are okay not being able to do these things without someone else's help ...


7

Your machine uses mechanical advantage (or disadvantage) to multiply the resistance of the stack. The machine presumably has a pulley system. Pulleys can multiply or divide the load that they are acting on, trading off against pulling distance. So for example, you can set up a pulley system to lift a 200lb weight with only 100lb of force acting on the other ...


7

As theonlygusti mentions, the bro split is looked down on. This is largely due to a 2016 meta-analysis of 10 different studies that concluded that major muscle groups should be trained at least twice a week to maximize growth. A more recent 2018 meta-analysis from 12 studies concluded: Results from this meta-analysis suggest that no significant effect ...


6

I think this is a very broad question as injuries resulting from bodybuilding or strength based exercise can range wildly depending on the intensity that someone does. The typical person that's just trying to stay fit and strong is going to have a wildly different experience and train in a wildly different manner than someone trying to get their IFBB pro ...


6

Firstly, moving your scapulae through a full range of motion in a pull-up will not work the muscles responsible for elevating the scapulae (i.e. upper traps and levator scapulae), as gravity does the work of scapular elevation during a hang. It's only the muscles responsible for scapular depression (pec minor, lat dorsi) that will be worked. The rhomboids ...


6

Short answer: you don't actually need to flare your knees out, but what you do need to do is generate torque in your hips which can be accomplished by attempting to rotate forward-facing feet outward ("screwing your feet into the ground") and thinking of this as pointing your knees out is a good physical cue. Details: The reason you externally ...


6

I would suggest starting with the barbell on the floor. If you can't, or won't, and the blocks are necessary1, then I would find some way to safely elevate yourself to the same level. Once you and the barbell are at the same level, you can work on getting your deadlift technique down. For that, I would recommend watching Alan Thrall's 5-step approach to the ...


5

Protein alone won't make you fat. Eating in a caloric surplus makes you fat. Calories are a combination of protein, fat, and carbs (and alcohol but hopefully that's not part of your regular diet). So what's happened to your friends is they stopped going to the gym. So their energy expenditure went down as a result meaning the amount of daily calories they ...


5

According to a meta-analysis (i.e. a scientific study of scientific studies), it does not matter: In conclusion, there is strong evidence that resistance training frequency does not significantly or meaningfully impact muscle hypertrophy when volume is equated. Thus, for a given training volume, individuals can choose a weekly frequency per muscle groups ...


5

The erector spinae muscles (iliocostalis, longissimus and spinalis) extend the back. In the back extension exercise they work isometrically to maintain an extended back against gravity that tries to flex the back. In the back extension exercise the glutes (gluteus maximus) and the hamstrings (semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and biceps femoris) works ...


5

Shoulder blade retraction is not the same thing as either upper back rounding/thoracic flexion or bridging/lumbar and thoracic extension. The shoulder blades move independently of the thoracic spine, so you can have either scapular retraction or protraction occurring in any combination with thoracic flexion or extension. The Stronglifts description of the ...


4

The first picture is a more accurate depiction of a proper rack position (i.e., over the eyes). The reason for beginning with your eyes under the bar isn't because it's easier to unrack (it's arguably more difficult). The primary reason is to allow full range of motion throughout each rep. When you bench press, you should create a "J" curve; ...


4

Firstly, the bar does not need to be over the midfoot for your balance to be over your midfoot. Instead, the combined centre of mass of the bar and the lifter's body needs to be over the midfoot, which means if the centre of mass of the lifter's body is in front of the midfoot (such as if they're leaning forwards), then the bar actually needs to be behind ...


4

You're pretty much using all back with your current form. Lifting with your legs is really important with a deadlift and will help you get more weight, as well as, not hurt your back. You have a really great form in your back, you just need to squat down a bit more for the full motion. StrongLifts suggest squatting down until your shins hit the bar. The ...


3

Control If you were to use only your spinal extensors to counteract the bending force that a deadlift, squat, or row applies to your torso, then those muscles would need to perfectly counteract the continuously changing bending moments exerted by the external load at each of the 17 joints throughout the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. Whereas if instead all ...


3

Unlike the knees, the hips don't really "lock" - upright femurs are the limit of range of motion of the knees, but an upright torso is not the limit of the range of motion of the hips. So the idea that it is crucial to "lock" the hips doesn't make sense. Powerlifting rules are usually simply that in the squat, the lifter must return to an ...


3

If you want a guide to lift a heavy object from the ground (or close to the ground) to around shoulder height, I would say you more want to look at the stone lifting in strongman training than something from the Olympic lifts. Firstly, the power clean isn't a deadlift > upright row > rack > overhead press, though it might appear that way at first ...


3

It's hard to make a direct comparison because the range of strength and muscle mass ranges wildly, but bodybuilders can have a lot more muscle while powerlifters and strongmen can be significantly stronger despite having less overall muscle mass. Strongmen and powerlifters don't necessarily need to be heavier to outlift a bodybuilder. An example comparison ...


3

You need to build muscle, there's no way around it. Building muscle is a long term process and commitment. If in your pursuit to build muscle you accumulate more fat than you are comfortable with, just cut for a little while and you'll be fine. Losing fat is a relatively super quick process compared to building muscle. A man might spend years, or even his ...


3

Summarising the systematic review, 'The Epidemiology of Injuries Across the Weight-Training Sports', by Keogh & Winwood, 2017: Bodybuilding had the lowest injury rates of all weight-training sports, at 0.12-0.7 injuries per lifter per year, or 0.24-1 injury per 1000 hours. Strongman was found to be the riskiest weight-training sport, with an injury rate ...


3

The density is different. Most humans perceive a density difference, as a weight difference. {Note that, of course, they could actually be different - grab a scale.)


3

That website's contention for why a thumbless grip lessens the load on the forearm muscles is that it prevents you from squeezing the bar: in a thumbless grip, also known as a “false” or “suicide” grip, the thumb is held under or outside of the bar rather than around the bar. There is no squeezing involved. However this absolutely would not apply to any ...


2

Water should be your top priority and your priorities after that might include a preworkout (or simply caffeine) and/or a small bite to eat such as a fruit. If you are working out shortly after waking up, your body should still be full (or mostly full) on glycogen from the night before unless you did some intense activity after your last meal. Your body will ...


2

No, muscle fatigue doesn't have to be expressed by pain, usually a burning sensation in the muscle is a good feedback, but its not a must. About the Deltoid muscle pain ,which i assume you mean by "there is no pain on my shoulders". The Deltoid is a muscle that tends to use other muscles as assistance in heavy loaded exercises. If the feeling of ...


2

This is a bit of an over generalisation or demonstrates how simple looks can be deceiving. Your question implies that body builders look like they should be stronger than powerlifters/strongmen, this I can only assume is because from a simple visual inspection without given perspective bodybuilders are visually heavily muscled, where a powerlifter or a ...


2

All resistance exercise involves forces being applied to the body in two distinct positions, with the forces acting in opposite directions. In any standing weighted exercise (squat, overhead pressing, deadlifts, etc), there is a downward force applied to the body by the weight, and an opposing upward force applied to the soles of the feet by the floor. It's ...


2

So to do the initial push, I would usually jerk my knees back as I go back onto the bench, one by one, but really fast so it seems simultaneous. Also, while you're going back on the bench you want to go back with your scapulas already retracted, so that once your back hits the bench you don't have to adjust. Now for the lower back pain, not too sure about ...


2

You basically answered your own question in the question, but since no one else has chimed in, I'll throw in $.02. I would not advise that someone actively shrugs their shoulders during a traditional barbell bent over row. If anything, I'd retract and set the traps and rear delts (similar to a bench press set up) in order to take the slack out and allow a ...


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