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2

You basically answered your own question in the question, but since no one else has chimed in, I'll throw in $.02. I would not advise that someone actively shrugs their shoulders during a traditional barbell bent over row. If anything, I'd retract and set the traps and rear delts (similar to a bench press set up) in order to take the slack out and allow a ...


5

The erector spinae muscles (iliocostalis, longissimus and spinalis) extend the back. In the back extension exercise they work isometrically to maintain an extended back against gravity that tries to flex the back. In the back extension exercise the glutes (gluteus maximus) and the hamstrings (semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and biceps femoris) works ...


1

What you're calling "squeezing your abs" is usually referred to as "bracing". Don't think of bracing as squeezing your abs inward. It's actually more of a push outward, together with your breath and your whole core musculature including your obliques, lower back and the inner core, creating a rigid and stable torso. Get your breathing ...


3

Control If you were to use only your spinal extensors to counteract the bending force that a deadlift, squat, or row applies to your torso, then those muscles would need to perfectly counteract the continuously changing bending moments exerted by the external load at each of the 17 joints throughout the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. Whereas if instead all ...


23

The article's explanations for why you shouldn't try to squat a deadlift are wrong. Positioning your hips too low does not put more stress on the lower back, and does not meaningfully shift your centre of gravity. What it does do is position your shoulders behind the bar, meaning to maintain this position as the bar comes off the floor, your anterior ...


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