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It's hard to make a direct comparison because the range of strength and muscle mass ranges wildly, but bodybuilders can have a lot more muscle while powerlifters and strongmen can be significantly stronger despite having less overall muscle mass. Strongmen and powerlifters don't necessarily need to be heavier to outlift a bodybuilder. An example comparison ...


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This is a bit of an over generalisation or demonstrates how simple looks can be deceiving. Your question implies that body builders look like they should be stronger than powerlifters/strongmen, this I can only assume is because from a simple visual inspection without given perspective bodybuilders are visually heavily muscled, where a powerlifter or a ...


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For this question to be properly answered more information is required. What has changed in your routine, have you: Increased your daily training volume Increased your weekly volume Changed the style of training, high reps, low reps 2.Has your diet changed, more food or a change in your macro allotments Have you introduced any supplementation? Have ...


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Your machine uses mechanical advantage (or disadvantage) to multiply the resistance of the stack. The machine presumably has a pulley system. Pulleys can multiply or divide the load that they are acting on, trading off against pulling distance. So for example, you can set up a pulley system to lift a 200lb weight with only 100lb of force acting on the other ...


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The optimal length and number of sessions per week will vary depending on how much effort you are putting forth in the gym, how much sleep and rest you're getting, the quality of your diet, and whether or not you are taking PEDs. If you're training like too many people I see in the gym these days who love to sit on the leg extension machine with 20 pounds on ...


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According to a meta-analysis (i.e. a scientific study of scientific studies), it does not matter: In conclusion, there is strong evidence that resistance training frequency does not significantly or meaningfully impact muscle hypertrophy when volume is equated. Thus, for a given training volume, individuals can choose a weekly frequency per muscle groups ...


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There's people who train for a full time job, 6 to 10 hours a day 6 days out of the week, often divided into multiple sessions per day. There's some who train 45 to 60 minutes a day 5 days a week. There's people who train 60 minutes twice or thrice a week. You just got yourself an one year experiment. Train with method 1 for 1 month then stop training for 3 ...


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