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1

Yes and no, there are some misconceptions, and there is no clear undisputable answer to any such question (as there are three dozen factors playing in, and diagonally opposing goals). No single thing is always good (or always bad) and no single thing works well for everybody and in every situation. Or, for every goal, for that matter. First, while people ...


5

It's a somewhat complex question. Let's start with your first sentence: If you are heavier you will be stronger whether this is by fat or by muscle I think we can all agree on that. No, I don't agree. What is true is that in martial arts and boxing lighter fighters have a disadvantage, probably even against heavier fighters who have the same absolute ...


0

Muscles make you stronger, not fat, fat will make you slow and lazy because Muscle is more metabolically active than fat. Since muscle is denser, if you compare two equal sizes of fat and muscle, the muscle would weigh more. The density of fat is .9g/ml whereas the density of muscle is 1.1g/ml. these numbers can vary depending on numerous factors such as ...


2

If you are heavier you will be stronger wether this is by fat or by muscle I think we can all agree on that. (I'm not talking about overly fat because at that point it would probably not hold true due to health reasons) There is no science which supports this claim. So if you have excessive fat, will you gain more muscle because you can lift heavier then ...


3

Most sports require lean performance as fat adds nothing but sport baggage. Good 40 yard times and slam dunks require it. IF you push your fat percentage below 5% other organs including the immune system will be compromised. Many Olympic performances have not gone as expected for this reason. Sumo wrestlers, cannon ball targets and cold water swimmers are ...


23

If you are heavier you will be stronger wether this is by fat or by muscle I think we can all agree on that. On what do you base this? Apart from very few lifts where a bit more body weight helps you, I can't see a scenario that shows having extra fat helps you lift weights. Say there is a version of me of 70kg with 10% body fat and a version of me of ...


1

When it comes to powerlifting, nothing really beats out doing squats. You can do a lot of leg work but the technique you gain from doing squats is missed. That said, leg extensions and leg curls will work your quads and hamstrings. Personally, I find the leg extension to be uncomfortable. One of my favourite quad building exercises is Bulgarian split squat ...


2

It makes me wonder, let's say if someone hypothetically took weight gainer, with anabolics, and did nothing else, no exercise. Would they be bottle necked and unable to grow muscles? No. People who take steroids without exercising do gain muscle. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199607043350101 If the muscles are bottle necked from growing by ...


0

There are two pecs - minor and major. Lower, middle, and upper refers to parts of later one - pectoralis major. Pectoralis minor is attached to scapula, and moves shoulders down, and froward. I would rather train back, and stretch this muscles - to have proper posture. We spend too much time sitting in position that makes them shorter. When you are ...


1

You can definitely work your arms and save time by doing a circuit or by performing super-setting. However, I don't believe doing back-to-back bicep workouts will help you. The idea behind super-setting is that you work different muscle groups. While one muscle group is being worked, the other muscle group rests. You lose this benefit when you just do the ...


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