Hot answers tagged

6

In short, Yes! There are two aspects to this: Bone Muscle Bone: Any exercise that places regular stress on a given bone will increase bone density overtime. For the wrist specifically, strengthening the forearm and hand muscles (in the forearm) will have the greatest effect. When you do these other exercises these muscles are still indirectly ...


5

Exercises that build muscle in your upper arms, shoulders, and upper back can make your shoulders look wider, but they won't change the actual distance between your joints. Although weight-bearing exercise can increase bone density, the basic geometry of your skeleton isn't really altered by exercise. There's no exercise that will make you taller or have ...


5

What you're addressing is also known as cortical remodeling. The human body is constantly recycling bone, at the rate of about 10% replacement per year. Impact and load bearing sports (Soccer, martial arts, weightlifting, running, etc.) are known to help retain bone mass density (BMD), while non weight bearing sports (swimming, cycling) do not have the ...


4

Yes. Let's consider adulthood to be 18 years old. Notice the hip range of motion in basketball players as they age: Source. What we're seeing here is players lose internal rotation range of motion at the hip much more than controls. At least into early adulthood / ~early 20s. (Granted, early twenties, much less 18 years old, does not guarantee complete ...


4

Your bones are primarily responsible for storing calcium and phosphorous. Almost 100% of the stored calcium in your body is in your bones, and somewhere around 85% of the phosphorous is stored there. When you have deficiencies in your diet in these minerals, then the body releases hormones that cause the bones to give up their calcium for use elsewhere in ...


3

As for the joint health part - why exactly are you trying to improve it? If youre experiencing joint pain or other similar problems, self medication and simple self-perscribed diet fixes are not the way to go. You should simply go see a doctor. If youre just wanting to have a healthier diet, you may try to include some gelatin. It is said that gelatin may ...


2

DEXA stands for dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Apparently it is often abbreviated as "DXA" these days, for reasons I'm not sure about. The technique consists of taking an X-ray image of the body at two different energy levels of radiation. When taking an X-ray image of someone's body, some portion of the rays is going to be absorbed by the body, while ...


2

If it is shin splints, as per your picture, the first step is to stop running for a bit and to ice the area to reduce inflammation. To be perfectly frank, the pain you're feeling is due to injury, and continuing to operate despite the injury is courting greater damage. This is also important because stress fractures are sometimes mistaken for shin splints, ...


2

Yes, it is considered healthy. According to this study, even taking a few dozens of steps will improve your fitness, at least for men. Furthermore, according to this study, several minutes of stair climbing will improve your health even more: "We know that sprint interval training works, but we were a bit surprised to see that the stair snacking approach ...


1

There is indeed variance between individuals' proportions, but your ability to touch your toes, relative to your friend's ability, is no measure of your torso length relative to your legs' lengths.


1

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/87/5/1567S.full https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4180248/ Despite a widely held belief that high-protein diets (especially diets high in animal protein) result in bone resorption and increased urinary calcium, higher protein diets are actually associated with greater bone mass and fewer fractures when ...


1

One way is to stop running, at least for a while. Like other bone injuries shin splints can take a long time to heal, several weeks or longer. Try stopping for a week and see if your legs feel better. This is why it is important to start slowly when you start running again and not do too much too quickly. Start off running one day a week, then slowly ...


1

Yes, regular physical fitness routines will indeed make a difference on bone structure and growth as well as muscle mass giving net result as an increase in shoulder distance. The younger you are as you begin, the greater the effect will be. Specifically, weight training and other anaerobic and high impact routines will have the greatest effect on both bone ...


1

Hitting yourself lightly with a stick might be a good way to start if you're not very good at handling pain. But to adequately add bone density you should be aiming to eventually (emphasis on eventually) be hitting a hard surface with about 10% of the required force to fracture the bone you're training. If you ever wanted to do tiger style Kung-Fu for ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible