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I'm partial to Tom Kurz' Science of Sports Training. Supertraining is well spoken of. Part of the problem you'll run into is that this is an incredibly broad topic that can span multiple distinct research disciplines. Going from the high level overview down to the biochemistry will take a long time if you're just looking to put together a workout program. ...


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While I linked a couple of books for you in the comments, I think the best approach is going to be looking along the NSCA (National Strength and Conditioning Association) type of path, as they look at weight training not only as a stand alone activity, but as a key component of many different athletic training programs. You will need to have an ...


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Fit by Lon Kilgore and Justin Lascek is a great book on general fitness and nutrition. Wide variety of training is covered (strength, endurance, and mobility). The Rippetoe books are great for strength training if that ends up being your primary focus. Other nutrition books I suggest to people are "The Paleo Solution" by Robb Wolf and "The Primal Blueprint" ...


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A couple books by Stuart McRobert. Either Beyond Brawn and The Insider's Tell All Handbook of Weight Training Technique or Build Muscle, Lose Fat, Look Great. The third is essentially the first two in one book. You could probably get away with just the technique book, as detailed instruction on lifts is pretty sparse. I've only seen Starting Strength go ...


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A few years back, while working on writing some fitness software, I came upon a book by Jim Bennett called The Weight Training Workbook. I was so impressed by the content that I decided to package it with the software. The book opens with a foreword by Bill Pearl former Mr. America, Mr. USA, and Mr. Universe. “This no-nonsense book leaves little to the ...


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I'ts merely always a trade-off. I am following YBIYG and I am quite happy with it, since it is quite great if you have little time and/or want to spend little money. YBIYG presents some example programs with 4-5 training days a week and 20-36 minutes of training a day, which I am following. My body has changed since I started the program, I am more defined ...


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One book that's been helpful is Jim Stoppani's Encyclopedia of Muscle & Strength. It has information on core concepts, workout programs, and nutrition along with a handy list of exercises. It also breaks down how to organize your workout program for various possible fitness goals (losing weight, gaining muscle mass, and gaining strength).


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To start off you should be doing a lot of dry land training now. i.e. running, if you have roller skies you should be using them now. For a 42-50k Ski race I would consider running at least a half-marathon running race. You should be cross training throughout the summer months. We bought a pair V2 and OneWay roller skies here http://xcski.gearwest.com/...


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Evidence-based books written for popular audiences include Gina Kolata's Ultimate Fitness and Gretchen Reynolds' The First 20 Minutes. Both writers are science reporters for the New York Times. Kolata's book is older (2007); she researches the origins of common fitness beliefs such as the "fat burning zone". Her book is part "debunking" and part research ...


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