12

I kind of think this is somewhat of a false dichotomy. In other words, there's a lot more to "getting shredded" or building strength than focusing strictly on calisthenics or weight lifting will do. First thing is to identify your goal. Getting shredded is having muscle mass, but very little (single digit percentage) body fat. Getting strong is being able ...


9

Weight lifting gains come from progressive overload, where "muscles are overloaded by attempting to lift at least as much weight as they are capable." (Exercise Physiology: Human Bioenergetics and Its Applications) In other words, muscle gains come from constantly pushing your muscles to adapt by increasing the load (i.e. reps and weight) you place on them. ...


7

No, it doesn't hit all three shoulder heads (assuming you mean the anterior, lateral and posterior deltoids.) Breakdown of handstand push-ups. Mechanically I don't see how you can work all of the shoulder muscles unless you can encounter resistance coming from the wide range of angles the shoulder can direct force to. A gymnast routine on the rings would ...


7

This is not a traditional gymnastics move, and in addition would be nearly impossible to pull off without assistance. (Note the guy holding his body out vertical with the rope). It is impressive, but it is solely a strength move, much like the people that can "spider walk" while hanging from a bar and other similar strength moves. Training for it is ...


6

Jie Liang, Moses pointed out a lot of good stuff already. This is a very good question, and it is very popular these days. Unfortunately, there are people out there will be biased regarding one or the other (body weight or weight lifting). I just wanted to make sure there is accurate information and share some thoughts regarding what I do for a living, ...


6

You're lacking exercises that involve significant engagement of the shoulder and posterior chain. A good rule of thumb is to include all of the "big five" exercises (or some variation of them) as a foundation. The big five are: Bench You have your bases covered here by doing push-ups. You could add a weight vest or loaded backpack to increase resistance....


6

Read Charles Bronson's book named Solitary Fitness Charlie Bronson has spent three decades in solitary confinement, and yet has stayed as fit as a fiddle, gaining several world strength and fitness records in the process. Now, in this no-nonsense guide to getting fit and staying fit, he reveals just how he's done it. You have time in your hand so it would ...


5

I prefer assisted pistol squats using both ends of a doorknob (facing the door end-on) or rings. I've also used cubicle walls (again, facing them end-on), for what it's worth. Lean on the rings or backwards away from the doorknob for support, and gradually try to use less assistance. Heeled shoes make pistols a lot easier for most people, due to ankle ...


5

Some exercise is indeed better than no exercise. Calisthenics would be a fine choice, as would yoga, dumbbell work, running, or some combination of those options. Anything is better than nothing. If you have half an hour, then twenty minutes of yoga to limber up before doing a bunch of push-ups, air squats, and pull-ups would probably hit the spot. If you ...


5

Probably the easiest form of 'handstand press' is starting with your feet on the ground, legs wide, putting your hands between the legs, and lift from there. (This version is called 'straddle press'.) There are many tutorials on youtube, see eg. this. To achieve this, you need: core strength, shoulder strength, hip and hamstring flexibility, wrist strength ...


5

The cheapest piece of exercise equipment for grip strength is one of those binder clips: They come in difference sizes, so start small and work your way up. Pinch it open between your pinky and your thumb. This tip comes from Mr. Ed Coan himself. When your grip breaks, it's always the pinky side first. If you get that side stronger the grip will be ...


5

Chinups (palms towards you) do activate your biceps more, but not at the cost of your lats. There's a bit of bro-science about pullups/chinups, but if you read a 2010 study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research it tells a different tale. Basically, the recruitment of the latissimus dorsi is the same: A general pattern of sequential ...


5

Supplemented protein should ideally be only a small part of your total daily protein intake. There are sources of very good proteins (depending on your diet). Dairy (such as (lowfat) quark, cottage cheese and the like) Eggs Lean meat Soy Beans ... The ballpark is something around 2 grams of protein per kg bodyweight to gain muscles. Assuming a weight of ...


5

I don't believe that "stop sweating" is a good goal simply because, as it stands, it isn't a SMART goal. You can absolutely train to reduce fat, lower your resting heart rate, and get better and faster at conquering those stairs. However, even the most experienced athletes start sweating at some point. Sweating is your body's natural method of cooling ...


4

Geek, A couple quick thoughts about this routine: One is that this is not a beginner routine (most beginners won't be able to perform pull-ups or dips), and two is that doing max out reps for each exercise is not the best way to start out of any exercise, workout or routine. You are at a higher risk for injuries (most commonly is tendonitis and extreme ...


4

I would suggest doing an exercise that will work your grip and another muscle group at the same time, like dead-lifts, shrugs, farmer's walk, etc. Probably the easiest of the ones mentioned would be shrugs and easy to progress since you can incrementally add weight after every week or so. I don't like using straps or gloves or anything that will ...


4

It will, up to a point. If you can only do 5-10 straight reps before having to break then it's still heavy enough to build decent muscle for you. Once you can do around fifteen or more in a row, however, it'll start to become decreasingly effective.


4

There is no reason why you shouldn't be able to progress on low carb and a caloric deficit if done right. We can't say that you are eating not enough if we don't know how much you are eating. Try not to go lower than 20% of your daily needs or your body will start to punish you. Not being hungry is a good indicator that you can't be doing it that terribly. ...


4

This might not be the answer to the question you've actually asked, but there's too much to put in a comment, so I'm going to risk the downvotes. Your question suggests that you believe the sweating is being caused by being overweight and thus heating up faster, causing your body to produce sweat as a cooling mechanism. While this may well be the case, ...


3

I would say this is mostly CORE, shoulders, lower back intensive. Exercises that would increase mobility and strength include: Yoga - stretching flexibility core stabilization Core work - planks, weighted crunches, leg lifts, hanging leg raises Military presses lateral raises - work your delts and traps for stabilization to hold that position. The ...


3

More than a year has passed. This is what eventually worked for me: isometric exercises with tennis balls. I built up slowly each third day, from two to four sets of five to ten "reps", where a "rep" here means five seconds squeezing hard a tennis ball in each hand. I recommend that approach to anyone in the same situation as me. Maybe it worked well ...


3

First point I see is that you should set your expectations well. At 15, your body is just beginning to be at a place where you can see muscular development. Everybody is a little different, so it may be a year or two before you see any appreciable muscle mass being built. However, keep at it. In all honesty, what you have outlined is too much variation ...


3

It all really depends on your goals respectively what is important to you. There are certain goals you can not achieve by calisthenics alone and the other way around. If you simply want to use your body and occasionally a pull-up bar I can recommend Never Gymless by Ross Enamait or Convict Conditioning by Paul Wade. Doing some deadlifts and bench-pressing ...


3

So you either have weak grip or your hands are actually physically slipping. Both very fixable issues, so don't be discouraged! If it is ACTUAL slipping, then there's a few things you can do. First, flour doesn't work NEARLY as well as just pure chalk. You know the stuff that olympic lifters use? You can get some at any supplement store or sports store for ...


3

First of all, working out for 3 months is a very short amount of time to notice significant differences, so there might be changes to your body that you haven't noticed. You might have become stronger without it showing yet, you might have become faster without you noticing it during your workouts. Secondly, if you want to look good, because I think that's ...


2

One or two time(s) a week a full body, full out (high intensity) workout will stimulate your muscles enough so they don't loose their size and strength. This is perfectly possible without a gym. You don't need fancy exercises, just one for every muscle group will keep your body perfectly in shape: Chest/Triceps/Shoulders: Push-up Back/Biceps: Pull-up Legs: ...


2

I've been training exclusively with bodyweight for the past year and don't miss weights one bit. Here is some basic advice: Perform whole body workouts and condense workout time down by alternating between muscle groups that don't fatigue each other. For instance, pair push ups with squats. Choose an exercise variation that is right for you. If you're doing ...


2

I also do not see any exercises that really work the lower back, bulking up on muscle while neglecting lower back can lead to poor posture and back pain. I would recommend deadlifts or hyperextensions. Cheers, Leo


2

You are currently placing a pulling load on a muscle system and seeing which part of the system fails first. It's easy to forget that strength training involves more than training just the muscle. It also involves load on the tendons, ligaments, and bones. Since you are experiencing what feels like inflammation of the tendons, it seems logical that the ...


2

Think about it for a second: once the movement starts, the weight of the body is being balanced by the leg on the floor; to maintain a good posture for the exercise, the body's weight shifts backwards. If the force generated by the leg on the floor can counteract the body's weight, the hands can be placed anywhere. However, for most people (or beginners), ...


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