6

Most calculators that you see in commercial fitness machines and similar include the BMR in the calculation. It's basically the difference between gross and net calorie. Gross calories are all calories burned during an exercise session (Which is what most calculators report), and net calories, which are the calories burned separate from your BMR. ...


5

They're actually the same thing as far as this is concerned. A "Calorie" and "Kilocalorie" is the same when talking about nutrition and exercise. Your watch says you burned 3000 Calories in the day and your dinner was 373 Calories. What food companies choose to put on food packaging is regional and usually dictated by the government. In the United States, ...


4

Protein requirement is a function of training workload. The literature suggests that optimal recovery and hypertrophy occur with dietary protein intake ranging from between about 1.2–2.0 grams per kilogram of body mass per day (g/kg/d), with serious endurance, strength, and power athletes requiring around 1.6 g/kg/d. Based upon your description, we would ...


3

Why the sum of them (22+3+5+4) are less than 100g? Animals are not just made of digestible matter, animals evolved to survive not to be walking candies ready to be eaten at any moment, some of it can't be digested so it is not listed, some of them are micro nutrients and not macro nutrients. Also water weight is important. Isn't it strange that in 100g ...


2

I am novice myself, but there is no way you can burn 800 calories an hour with push ups. Rope skipping, jumping jacks or simply jumping might help you reach there. I never did more than 300 repetitions of jumping jacks and when I do that much, it hurts my knees and my ankles a little, that is why I don't go further than 300. Rope skipping or regular jumping ...


2

All calories are equal, but the sources of those calories are not. Let's look at the calories themselves first. A certain amount of body mass will require a certain amount of energy to sustain itself and activity imposes additional energy costs. The body manages an energy surplus by storing the extra energy and the body manages an energy deficit by using up ...


2

Weight loss is a relatively simple process that occurs in response to an energy deficit. An individual's TDEE (total daily energy expenditure) represents the total energy that a person spends each day across their many activities and metabolic processes. If these energy costs aren't counterbalanced by a sufficient caloric intake, a deficit is produced. The ...


1

The weight of all the macros in a food is not the total weight of the food. Most foods contain at least a little water, and minerals and plenty of other things. The left over quarter is all that other "stuff". For example, living (or at one point living, like chicken breast) things contain about 60% water. This percent is way higher for things like ...


1

If you jog in the same pace and distance within that hour window, then the energy expended will be the same. For example, running 10 miles in 60 minutes will burn the same amount of energy/calories and running 5 miles in two 30 minutes bouts. You might be able to run more often or faster if you split the workout in to two a day because you don't have the ...


1

Replacing "cardio", with "not cardio" is not a good idea to begin with. You should always strive to have a good mix of the both just for general health. You should first ask yourself, why do you want to burn that many calories? Is it to maintain the calorie in calorie out balance (ie: I can eat this doughnut if I run an hour after)? Do ...


1

From the July 2004 issue of the Harvard Health Letter, for 30 minutes of jumping rope: 125-pound (56.6 kg) person: 300 calories 155-pound (70.3 kg) person: 372 calories 185-pound (83.9 kg) person: 444 calories The figures are deceptively accurate, but perhaps you can use them as a starting point. They all revolve around 5 calories per minute of activity. ...


1

You may be able to discover this on a non-motorised machine e.g. a bike by starting a workout but not actually performing any work, check the rate at which energy is accumulated over time.


1

I was having mass gainer shakes a few years back when bulking up... the main reason I used them was because I have a fast metabolism and it was a convenient way to pack in a load of extra calories without filling myself up as much as I would have through eating nothing but whole foods. So if your situation is similar to mine, then go for it. Just compare how ...


1

Honestly, the answer whether mass gainer would be a useful addition to your diet is the following. Assuming you workout a few days a week, whether or not you should be using mass gainer has little to do with the intensity of the workouts. It has everything to do with time investment. Mass gainers are simply there for those who don't always have the time or ...


1

48 hour fasts or prolonged fasting is awesome when it comes to increasing autophagy, increasing HGH, entering ketosis, curbing your hunger, refreshing your body and mind, spiritually, etc. If your goal is to maintain body composition then the 48H fasts will allow you some wiggle room with your calories. Post 48H fast, definitely refeed. If you're low-carb ...


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