7

If this was a one-off, perhaps you don't need to do worry about it. However, if situations like these repeat themselves, it might be a good idea to simply observe, for a time, your eating habits and think about what might trigger these hunger attacks. (What follows are two observations of my own. They might or might not fit your sitation; please judge for ...


6

There is a lot of misinformation and fear being spread about sodas of all kinds. Really, drinking diet soda should not have any effect on a low carb diet for most people. There are 0 calories diet soda. Diet soda is 99.8% water (Can't link to USDA reference site due to government shutdown) The main risks from diet soda are Tooth enamel decay Bone loss ...


5

Technically speaking, the energy used by the muscles is not glycogen, but the phosphate bonds in adenosine triphosphate (ATP). When energy is needed, one of the phosphate bonds is broken, resulting in an energy release and the creation of the subsequent adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and waste materials. This is one of the main reasons that creatine phosphate ...


5

Yes, it's a process called glycogenesis. Your larger issue is simply about calories. While your body can produce glycogen from spinach (as an example), there's only 105 calories in a pound of spinach. Spinach actually has some protein in it as well, and your body will use gluconeogenesis to convert some of that protein into glucose. So while from a pure ...


4

None of this is necessary. Plenty of people just "eat food, a lot of it, mostly protein" (to repurpose Michael Pollan) and find that plenty to fuel a heavy lifting regimen or strength & conditioning program. As long as you're roughly cognizant enough of all three macros such that you don't become tremendously unbalanced, you don't have to track ...


4

No you don't. It won't affect body composition in any serious fashion.


3

Qualified personal trainer here. Post-training, your body has depleted its glycogen stores. In order to replenish them, it must utilise a macronutrient; carbohydrates, proteins, and fats (absorbed in that order). Your body's metabolism receives a serious boost after intense weight-training, so macronutrients are absorbed as an accelerated level. Since the ...


3

If you will not be exercising again for 24 hrs., the rapid ingestion of carbohydrates to replace muscle glycogen storage is not quite as important as it would be if you were to exercise again within a shorter window of time. According to "The Role of Post-Exercise Nutrient Administration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Glycogen Synthesis" in the Journal ...


3

What do you mean by carb deficit? There is no carb requirement level that you can be over or under. You can eat 80% carbs or 0% carbs and be fine. If your total intake of calories is less than your total calorie use, you will burn fat, even if you lie in bed all day. Wether you lose fat or muscle depends on your current amount of muscle, on your level of ...


3

0% or 2% Fage Greek Yogurt. Grilled chicken. Steamed/baked veggies. Whey, water, and a blender bottle. Tuna fish, just you, the can, and the fork. There's really no easy way to have very low body fat. For me anyway, when I start getting near 10%, my willpower goes out the window. But I also don't care that much and 10-15% is fine for me. It's just not worth ...


3

The best way to determine if a carb source is going to be slow digesting or not is to look at the fiber content. Not all whole grains are particularly high in fiber. When looking at the list of foods you find recommended over and over again, most are relatively high fiber foods: Brown rice: 3.5g / cup Sweet potato: 4g / cup Pumpkin: 3g / cup Oatmeal: 4g / ...


3

Physics dictates that if the energy you take in is less than your 'energy out', you will lose weight. You can lose weight eating 100% french fries, as long as your energy expenditure is greater than the calories you consume. All foods have a 'thermic effect', including carbs. This said, it is very important to eat a balanced diet, this means a diet with ...


3

Jam, chocolate (candy), syrup, and sugar cereal (most) in significant daily quantities may ultimately increase your insulin resistance and thus risk of diabetes and other health conditions along with fat gain and greater difficulty losing it. Salami, Cheese, and Peanut-butter (most have lower sugar with beneficial nutrients) are the healthier choices here ...


3

I know that just drinking soda or juice is not a suitable way to get carbs since the lack of fiber will cause the sugar to be stored as fat. I'm not sure where that came from. Fiber can't be digested as easily as complex or simple carbs. That's usually why people subtract them from the total amount of carbs (though I don't do this. It just complicates ...


2

The first 2 so called 'facts' you've listed I think you may find that with a little more research are not actually FACT. I really don't believe it matters when you eat. If 30 minutes before you go to bed is when you eat your last meal, then that's exactly when you eat. The whole 'no carbs before bed' thing is a bit of a myth based on everything I've read. ...


2

Unlike protein and fat, there are no specific requirements for your body with respect to carbs. This is why people are able to get away with ketogenic diets that cut out all carbs. That being said, carbs definitely serve a purpose, especially with regard to physical fitness, muscle growth, and sports. Carbs are the preferred fuel source for your body, and ...


2

Eating large volumes of food will increase the size of your stomach temporarily, one of the many things that affect hunger is stomach emptiness, which will be the state of your stomach after eating a lot the night before.


2

Carbo loading is generally recommended for endurance events - anything longer than 90 minutes at a moderate pace. In addition, carbo-loading typically has to be done several days in advance. It's possible to glean benefits from carbo-loading the day before, but only if you've been actively maintaining your glycogen stores by replenishing them after ...


2

From Iowa State University: A well-nourished adult can store approximately 500 grams or 2000 kcal of carbohydrates. Of this, approximately 400 grams are stored as muscle glycogen, 90-110 grams as liver glycogen, and 25 grams circulate in the blood as glucose. I don't think the weight is very relevant. Answering your question directly, the goal for ...


2

I'm in favor of low carbohydrates for two primary reasons: Ketosis is legimate, effective, and safe way to cut down on body fat. There are examples of native people who historically ate very little carbohydrates for generations. Most of the sinister cheap calories in a western diet come from carbohydrates. Even following a "low carbohydrate diet" still has ...


2

Dr Peter Attia is an accomplished athlete who has remarkable athletic endurance accomplishments performed during nutritional ketosis (due to very low carbohydrate intake). His blog is well-researched and well written. I think you'll find his answer to your question is that carbs are not necessary for the type of activity you plan. My personal experience is ...


2

2010 ISSN Position Stand: • Individuals engaged in a general fitness program can typically meet needs by consuming a normal diet (45-55% CHO; 3-5 g/kg/day). • Athletes involved in moderate amounts of intense training (2-3 hrs/day, 5-6 times/week) typically need to consume 55-65% CHO (5-8 g/kg/day or 250 - 1,200 g/day for 50 - 150 kg athletes) in order to ...


2

Let's make this clear and net. First of all you can also avoid eating just after a workout if you're not hungry ( it's relly common ); just wait an hour or two maybe and then eat, unless you have a second workout later on the same day. Your body is actually using the energy from pervious meals to replenish what you have used ( mostly in terms of glycogen ) ...


2

The health aspect of the question would get a better response in the Health.SE site. Is it a good idea for a workout? Pretty much every single "energy supplement" uses pure sugar as its base. They also typically include caffeine, b-vitamins, and other things, but the main active ingredient is the sugar. So it is widely used. Powerlifters will eat pure-...


2

As the comments hit on, you could take this question various ways. I'm also going to have to dive deep in my brain back to my exercise physiology classes, but I think I can give something relevant scientifically and practically. Scientifically There are 4 calories per gram of carbohydrate. You want to use 45 grams per hour: 45 * 4 = 180 calories per hour ...


2

In theory, provided you consume enough of something containing carbohydrates then yes, you can replenish muscle glycogen eventually. It's a little more complicated than that in practice. For example, 100 grams of raw dandelion provides only 5.7 grams of carbohydrates (when you remove the fiber). Assuming total muscle glycogen depletion (which never ...


2

I think the question you really wanted to ask is: Is it healthier to eat starch-based carbohydrates instead of sugar-based carbohydrates? A good question, because sugar is not equals sugar. Common sugar is saccharose, usually from the sugar cane, consisting of one part of glucose and one part of fructose. Even if you'd ask about saccharose versus glucose, ...


1

It's not that important to eat after workouts, the most important factor is your total protein intake during the day. What kind of workout do you do? If it's just weight lifting you definitely do not need carbs after workouts. An average body can store 2000 kcal of glycogen (carbs), if you are a marathon runner or professional athlete, you'll have a hard ...


1

This question, as worded, is off-topic. But, since I've written such a program in the past, I'll point you to what I used. The USDA maintains a Nurtient Database that can be downloaded. If memory serves me, it's large and is distributed in several parts. There is documentation to help you decipher each part of the download.


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