14

The common wisdom is that the chin up (supinated grip) targets the biceps. It also appears to target the pectoralis major. The pull up targets the lower trapezius more. Source Ellington Darden also says the chin up better targets the lats because the involvement of the biceps means the arms won't give out as quickly as the pull up, allowing the back to get ...


9

Do slow negatives, start at the top and lower yourself slowly, this is the way most people get strong enough to do their first, clean pull/chin-ups. If you have a rubber band to attach to the bar, that can work too.,


8

I suppose he mentioned it because in general when one is using bands to help himself with the chin-ups he gets used to them and forgets that they must be there just temporary. However his statement is not true. I did not use bands when learning the chin-up but I did use bands when learning the One Arm Chin Up(Disclosure: this is my personal website). It was ...


8

Volume If you can do two or three sets of about 6 chin-ups, I'd focus on volume rather than any particular set or rep scheme. That's because it's hard to stick to any particular number of reps per set with chin-ups in general, and especially so when the trainee can do less than 10 in a set. (Increased but tolerable volume is frequently the goal when ...


8

I think what's missing in the discussion area is a bit more context. Taking all sets to failure would include the barbell sets. Taking your barbell sets to failure is not part of starting strength. Why take body weight exercises to failure? Body weight exercises don't cause near the stress on your body as the barbell work. Essentially, you can recover ...


7

I'd like to break down a few things first which I think might help to explain what I think is going on with your situation. First off, great work on starting with chinups / pullups. They are a terrific compound exercise that works basically everything from your mid back to your fingers. Bicep curls on the other hand are maybe not the most absurd exercise, ...


6

These are exact words from Arnold Schwarzenegger in the July 2007 Muscle and Fitness: [...] you can build up to doing full-range-of-motion chins for many reps. Start with the lat pulldown machine. Over time, increase the weight until you're doing pulldowns with your equivalent bodyweight for about eight reps. Then, leave the machine and to free-hanging ...


6

This is a great question! As far as muscle recruitment goes, the bent-over barbell rows do yield the most muscle activity for the lats (back) and the biceps during EMG (electromyographic studies); however, this is only when you comparing with other bent-over row exercises (dumbbell, cable, etc.). Regarding the most effective lat and bicep exercises, ...


6

It doesn't sound bad. I recommend going above five reps for at least some sets, since I find the upper body responds well to higher volume and it's not the worst thing in the world to train some endurance. I expect you'll actually see better strength results that way anyway. The more common method of loading pull-ups is to use a dip belt, but the backpack ...


5

I would suggest doing an exercise that will work your grip and another muscle group at the same time, like dead-lifts, shrugs, farmer's walk, etc. Probably the easiest of the ones mentioned would be shrugs and easy to progress since you can incrementally add weight after every week or so. I don't like using straps or gloves or anything that will ...


5

The cheapest piece of exercise equipment for grip strength is one of those binder clips: They come in difference sizes, so start small and work your way up. Pinch it open between your pinky and your thumb. This tip comes from Mr. Ed Coan himself. When your grip breaks, it's always the pinky side first. If you get that side stronger the grip will be ...


5

I sweat a lot. When my grip slips because of sweat, I blame the sweat and not the bar. This approach works pretty well. I wear sweat-bands on my wrists and carry chalk. I wipe the sweat from both sides of my hands onto a towel or my shirt, then chalk my palms copiously. This keeps my grip mostly dry.


5

I haven't worked out using straps but I would consider they are similar to still rings. The difference between still rings and pull-up bar exercising is that the rings are not static, they can move and as informaficker said you need to maintain a good balance on them in order to exercise. Once you get more experienced and gain strength it would not make a ...


5

From your other question I know that the lat pulldown machine broke down, however: Using a machine does not really prepare you for the real exercise. To improve any body weight or free weight exercise it is best to not use a machine. The machine controls the path of the weight and you don't have to worry about the weight dropping uncontrolled or tipping over ...


5

Pull ups are much harder for women, than for men. Males have significant more muscle mass on their upper bodies than women does, so it is natural, it is hard. That said, focus on assisted exercises to begin with. Grip strength also plays a role, but should come quite quickly for beginners. Rubber-bands Assisted Pull-ups - lift her up by her feet Row ...


5

Chinups (palms towards you) do activate your biceps more, but not at the cost of your lats. There's a bit of bro-science about pullups/chinups, but if you read a 2010 study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research it tells a different tale. Basically, the recruitment of the latissimus dorsi is the same: A general pattern of sequential ...


5

The greasing the groove method of training isn't actually about muscle growth, which is why it seems contradictory to the usual advice about hypertrophy (gettin' bigger). The greasing the groove method is more about training and practicing the movement pattern so it becomes more ingrained and your body becomes more efficient at performing it. I think it's ...


4

The point is just that the band assisted chin should not be thought of as an "easier chin-up." It is a different exercise, it is a different skill that you are learning. (The non-linear nature of the band helping you out most at the bottom, where the shoulder mobility that most people lack is most important, making it easier to start with bad shoulder ...


4

Adding this answer just in case another person stumbles across it. If you're doing weighted pullups, it becomes pretty important to keep your back straight. Your body tends to whipsaw around a bit when you're doing pullups fast, and the added weight dangling off your waist can pull and yank on your back in un-fun ways. If you keep the weight dangling ...


4

This a multitude of things you can use. Here's a list that I suggest: Lifting straps Chalk Sand (I do this when I do my spartan races, right before the pull up bars) Of course, if there isn't any sand, I suggest bringing a little chalk to rub on your hands before you do your chin ups. This dries up your hands and enables you to lift yourself much easier. ...


4

Pull ups require good development of the back muscles , and you are lifting your body weight. So to increase the number of pull ups you can start doing lat pull downs on machine . These pull downs are to be performed with strict form , with no or least bent in the spine, and bringing the bar to your chins.As you progress and reach about 80-90 % of your body ...


4

I was finally able to do pull-ups starting last year. I had previously tried assisted pull-ups and was never able to get up to body weight pull-ups What finally helped me do pull-ups were a few things: 1) instead of assisted pull-ups, try negative pull-ups. You start at the top of the bar and lower yourself down in a slow, controlled motion, lasting 4-5 ...


4

You're not really greasing the groove right now, and greasing the groove may not be the path to your goal. Six sets of 3-4 pull-ups between squat sets is not greasing the groove--three days a week, you're not greasing the groove! 35 to 40 reps per day is not high volume Maxing out once a week is just not very much practice You're splitting your attention ...


4

If you want to use a range of motion you need to use that range of motion. If you don't go all the way to the bottom of a chin-up then you won't grow strength in that end range of motion, you won't develop joint mobility keeping or making that a comfortable movement, and you'll leave out the development of muscles and tissues that are only engaged at that ...


3

More than a year has passed. This is what eventually worked for me: isometric exercises with tennis balls. I built up slowly each third day, from two to four sets of five to ten "reps", where a "rep" here means five seconds squeezing hard a tennis ball in each hand. I recommend that approach to anyone in the same situation as me. Maybe it worked well ...


3

I didn't really feel that I get a training effect if I could only do one good form pull up in a row. So as my exercise was really lacking a pulling motion, I found Inverted Rows to be a great way to work my way up to pull ups and chin ups. Combining the often heard pull up rule "If you can only do one, do them as often as you can" and inverted rows in ...


3

on the question about the seemingly contradictory practices of recovery but also frequent GtG, this article has some good info: http://breakingmuscle.com/strength-conditioning/greasing-the-groove-how-to-make-it-work-for-you It may seem counterintuitive as we often hear how we need to avoid overtraining. However, if we are not training to failure our ...


3

Seems your best bet would be to use resistance bands. Figure out your max with the strongest resistance band. once you have established this number than do your sets throughout the day with 60-75% of that number. As you increase your repetitions over time use lighter resistance bands and then eventually no resistance bands at all.


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