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How does [someone] prepare to do 110 pull ups in a row Start by recognizing this as an extreme goal. I bet the people achieving >75 pull-ups got there by doing gymnastics or bar calisthenics for years. Coming even close to this number of pull-ups in one set is such a rare skill that you shouldn't ask anyone who hasn't done it. (Elite training is so ...


4

You could keep your bodyweight mass down, lose fat if you have any, and do several lat exercises such as landmine rows with t bar, or lat bars, one armed rows, etc. Use an endurance type rep scheme(15-20). Working your forearm strength and grip as well as core and biceps to some degree with additional training. Try adding weight here and there but focus more ...


2

The issue with band-assisted pullups/chinups is that the band does not provide constant supporting force throughout the range of motion. However, if the "most difficult" part for you is at the bottom, while the top is easy, then sure, band-assisted pullups/chinups are just fine. Otherwise, they'll prevent you from building strength in the weaker areas, and ...


1

Because chin ups are not pull ups. A pull up is, as the word says pulling up, straight up. The faster way from point A to point B is a straight line most of the time. And a pull up is just that a straight line, up and down. The chin up feels like 4 different motions because it is, a chin up due to wrist position can't be done in a straight line without ...


1

Don't. If you can do 100 pullups, unless you're doing it to prove a point or show off, training to do 110 is a huge waste of time, because the majority of your time is spent slowly reaching your limit, at which point gains can be made. Instead, make the exercise harder until you're reaching your limit at, say, ten reps. For pullups, perhaps make moves ...


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