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6

What you are feeling is normal. Any time you do a new exercise, or even an old exercise in a new way, you will be pushing your muscles past the point where they are comfortable and making them sore. For the most part, this is lumped into the term Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS). For some people, the presence of DOMS becomes a goal or a indication of a ...


6

Work on the flexibility in your ankles. You should easily be able to make a straight line from your shin down the top of your foot to your toes. This is the ideal position to get the most propulsion from your feet in the flutter (backstroke/crawl) or dolphin kick (butterfly). If there is any arc/bend in that line, then you lose some effectiveness. Also, ...


5

You’re using too much kick in your swim, and may be kicking off the wall incorrectly. Distance swimmers don’t need a tremendous amount of kick - especially triathletes. You’re just going to tire your legs out for the bike and run. Even 1500m specialists like Katie Ledecky use a 1 or 2 beat kick for most of their races. Generally, they don’t use a 6 or 8 beat ...


4

I can't state that the temperature was your problem, but it's the title of the question so I'm going to answer that specifically. Someone who is acclimated to heat will have numerous physiological advantages over someone who is not: They will sweat out less electrolytes, particularly salt. They will sweat earlier, starting heat regulation early on. They ...


4

I primarily agree with Sparafusile. DOMS is pretty normal, especially for those impulse exercise sessions where you haven't warmed up, or haven't done the exercise before. Over the counter painkillers and anti-inflammatories such as aspirin or ibuprofen combined with heating pads or hot baths will give you enough relief to be able to sleep. For steps, as ...


3

The general consensus in the athlete population, and between trainers as well, is that the cause is unknown. However, in med-school I was told that it is, at least in the medical community, known. And in my pathology book, which was in Serbian though (but translated from an American one; I don't remember which one). The idea is that classical side stitch (...


3

You might not need to warm up your calves more. You might just be dehydrated. Try reducing caffeine consumption, increasing water consumption, monitor your salt intake (if you're eating a ton of processed food, do that less, if you're eating all whole foods, make sure you get enough salt). I've heard potassium could help, but I've also heard it's a myth, ...


2

Jump rope! Maybe do one-legged in sets of paradiddles (left - right - left - left - right - left - right - right). I find when you do one legged jump roping it naturally keeps you on your toes (which will work your calfs more) and helps to ensure you aren't favoring one side. If your only goal is to warm up the calf muscle, you shouldn't need to do that ...


2

It is a matter of vasoconstriction of blood vessels. Usually your blood vessels constricts during cold and it reduces the blood flow.( Its actually the reverse of increased blood flow when using hot water bags in the inflammated or painful areas of your body). Its a normal mechanism in our body! You may prevent this by warm clothes or leg bandages! It will ...


2

Eat something with a lot of potassium.... Like a banana. Th potassium stops cramps. My uncle's doctor even told him to eat a banana a day because he was getting such bad cramps.


2

This happened to me when I started doing vigorous yoga again after an extended period of absence. My flexor muscles would cramp in simple things like child pose, but my base foot would always cramp during balance postures. It went away after a few weeks, in combination with the exercise and corrective measures. My primary training is as a massage therapist ...


2

Proper hydration is key to preventing cramps. If you have ruled hydration out as a cause, try rolling the arches of your feet on a lacrosse ball (you can get them cheap at the sporting goods store in sets of 3 or ask to get some old ones from a club team). Stand on one leg then step the arch of the other leg onto the lacrosse ball. Apply as much pressure ...


2

I would suggest the following: When hydrating, do so in small amounts over long period of time rather than drinking a whole glass/cup/bottle at once Eat meals 3-4 hours or more before running Experiment with what you're eating Try eating something like bread before you run (not a lot, see point 2)


2

Even with the measures you've indicated, there's no guarantee that the cramps will stop. Cramping is not well understood. It's not simply caused by low potassium, sodium, or electrolytes. Those may certainly affect cramping, but, there are other factors involved, some of which, are not fully understood. Age, prior injury, and, recovery ability can ...


2

Taping for a cramp seems to be an excessive measure considering the causes are many, and, the taping may actually exacerbate the situation if it affects circulation. Since there's no definitive study to indicate the exact causes for cramps (there seem to be many possibilities), I think your best course of action is to prepare yourself ahead of time. I have ...


2

Note: Much of this is taken from my answer here, as I believe they are similar situations. However, I would disregard the pacing, as I ran your pace through the Macmillan calculator, and I don't see anything indicating that your pace was too ambitious. Climate: Many times people underestimate the effect that climate has on an endurance event. Either much ...


2

I’ve had the same issue when occasionally using that machine(1). While compiling some anecdotal evidence, it always seemed to happen after a recent bout of calf cramps. I played with the positioning of the seat and other machine adjustments until I realized that I could not totally remove my calves from the exercise. Rather, I would lessen the involvement ...


1

A few possibilities: You can get pain from running with new shoes regardless of whether or not the new shoes are the "best fit" for your body. Dramatic changes in shoes means dramatic changes in running gate which means you're running in a way that different than what you're used to. It's sometimes easy to overlook how a small change can effect you, but ...


1

It look like a muscle cramp to me, but we have to wait one more day to tell if it was a cramp. If the pain goes away, then it is a cramp, if not, it might be a tear. Here is more info: What is a Cramp? A cramp in a muscle is caused by an involuntary spasm or contraction. It is usually sudden, can cause significant pain and can limit the use of the ...


1

I think this might get closed as a duplicate of how to prevent calf cramps while swimming, but you directly asked this so I'll try to answer it for you: What is the mechanism of this pain - is it the same as an intense workout or is it something else that just feels that way. There are two competing theories (neither proven, empirically) on EAMC (...


1

I recommend rolling the bottoms of your feet with a tennis ball; that should help loosen things up nicely.


1

I get similar kinds of cramps in my calves. I have a 2 part solution that's worked well for me: Eat a banana pre- or post-workout Buy a stick massager (below) and roll your muscles with it. It works best if the muscle is constricted while being massaged. This puts you at risk of cramping, and makes it extremely painful, but it does wonders for loosening up ...


1

I had cramps recently after spinning on bike trainer in cold basement. The problem was a hydration. I stopped using electrolytes, because I thought I'm not sweating as much as on warm weather and drank clean water alone. After I started using sport drinks again, problem disappeared.


1

OK, this is speculation as I'm not a woman, but in reading The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook by Clair Davies I came across a bit that mentioned some trigger points on the legs can contribute to a much more painful period, and it doesn't strike me as odd that running could set that off as well. If nobody else can give you a useful answer, I'd suggest ...


1

In the case of injury, consult a doctor as needed. Physical therapists may also help to prevent the injury from becoming serious. If you don't believe it to be serious, try to stretch the surrounding areas. Jay Dicharry of the UVA Speed Clinic recommends Standing Calf Stretches to target the soleus and gastroc muscles of the calf. For a better stretch, ...


1

If we are right handed we automatically use the right side more without thinking about it.Like reaching for something on the top shelf, we stretch using only the right leg, or play any sport, we lung with the right leg first. Have you had any serious injuries in the past like in your gastrocnemius and the soleus (calf)? This could be causing your cramp. ...


1

Perhaps fins are like running shoes. It seems I can wear a pair for about 5 months (swimming about 10 miles a week). After that period, the fins start to stretch out around the toe area. As soon as I replace them I'm good. I too cramp only at night, not during my early morning workouts when my fins start to wear. I like TYR fins too. Reasonable, ...


1

I'm going to provide a slightly different answer on this: if there is any permanent damage done when pushing through cramps when exercising? Potentially. Similar to DOMS, a lot of the focus on training through the discomfort assumes that you can hold perfect form. If you are squatting, as an example, and develop pain your left leg, there is a very good ...


1

There is almost no direct evidence that muscle cramps are caused by electrolyte or water imbalances (given normal hydration prior to start). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3445088/ Its most likely due to the muscle being "pre-tight" and stretching is the best prevention and therapy. No one knows actually the cause of cramps.


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