10

Creatine naturally exists in animal protein sources, so it will be effective as long as you are creatine deficient. The perceived benefit of creatine will lessen as you reach the levels your body needs. Summary of points from Creatine: Side Effects, What it is, What it does: You will gain weight. Initially 2-4lbs water weight, potentially muscle Muscle ...


9

First off, don't place too much value in your identification as an ectomorph. It belongs to a very old, and debunked myth about somatotypes. Now, the point of creatine isn't to gain a permanent weight increase. The point of creatine is to improve muscle recovery between sets by increasing their susceptibility to water, and thus their durability and stamina. ...


5

Creatine increases the high energy phosphate diffusion between the mitochondria and myosine heads. Furthermore it works as a buffer for pH changes, which can improve cellulair homeostasis. And a decreased PCr level stimulates phosphofructokinase, an enzyme which limits glycolysis, and thus replenishment of this will lead to an improved glycolysis which also ...


5

In general I think all the colorful drinks are about marketing. The supplement industry has done a good job of convincing people that products are required pretty much 24/7. A pre-workout before you hit the gym, an intra-workout tagging along with you in the gym, a post-workout so you don't miss out on this mad gainz, supplements throughout the day to the ...


4

An answer to another question lead me to an the article Conquering creatine myths with science which also talks about other forms of creatine: Harris showed that the vast majority of creatine powder consumed is absorbed -- about 95% of the dose. […] Special treatments and "delivery systems," such as micronization, effervescent powder, or sublingual ...


4

Web MD has a surprisingly well balanced article on Creatine. A couple of the highlights are: It is common in meats such as beef and fish It is not common in vegetables, so vegans and vegetarians might be deficient It can also be made in a laboratory "There is some science supporting the use of creatine in improving the athletic performance of young, ...


4

Should I cycle Creatine Use? No. Quite simply, it just helps with energy, endurance, and indirectly performance in the gym. There is no benefit from "cycling on or off" with creatine. For further reading, check out the excellent Examine.com article on Creatine. Typical dosage is 5g / day. Loading phase may not be necessary in most people, but no harm in ...


4

Check out these resources for more specifics about the supplements: Glutamine -- not shown to increase muscle mass, but shown to lower inflammation (i.e. recovery). Timing doesn't matter. No more than 5g any time of day. (Brown Rice) Protein -- protein is protein. There is minimal increased uptake during and post training. One book recommended 10-15g pre,...


4

TL;DR: There don't seem to be many negative side effects besides water retention and the need to take in more water, although the benefit is limited for people who aren't already up against their limits and it doesn't seem to help for endurance training. Per WebMD: Creatine is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately for up to 5 years. When ...


4

First of all, BCAAs are branched-chain amino acids, and amino acids are the building blocks for protein. Your body can get amino acids from protein sources by catabolism just fine. Eat good protein sources, eat varied and supplement only as needed. Paying a premium for things that are needlessly complex (such as whey isolate instead of simple concentrate) ...


4

Creating draws more water into your muscle cells, which helps to increase muscle bulk and also increase protein synthesis (1)(2), although the total amount of water involved is relatively small. It may be this, or anecdotal evidence that creatine causes cramps - which does not appear to be backed up by evidence (3)(4), which has caused some articles to ...


4

No. Not in the way you're thinking. The reason more muscle burns fat faster than less muscle is because there are physically more muscle cells that require nutrients to function. Creatine just holds water in the muscle which makes them look bigger. There isn't actually more muscle. Your TDEE remains consistent. Creatine can help keep performance up. This in ...


3

Why on earth would you want to drink two gallons of water a day? While the myth of 8 glasses of water a day perpetuates, you don't need near that amount of water with or without creatine. Most of the "8 glasses" came about because people's diets became deficient in fruits and veggies that are mostly water. Now, that being said, yes, making sure that you ...


3

The comments/answers about excess stuff easily disposed of by the body are rather inaccurate; water-soluble vitamins will wash out as you mentioned, but excess fat-soluble vitamins will remain in the adipose tissue, and will be released into the bloodstream as fat is burned, overloading kidneys and livers. Also Ca/K/Mg ions are the driving force of the ...


3

Neither of these supplements are habit forming so no, your body will not "crave" them after you stop using them. However, the effects of both will subside when you stop taking them. If you need to supplement a weight gainer to pack on mass, you will likely need to continue to keep your caloric intake at a certain level to continue to sustain your bulk. ...


3

Yes, creatine can be taken on rest days as well. Here is an excellent article with research backed data on creatine: http://examine.com/supplements/Creatine/ Creatine monohydrate can be supplemented through a loading protocol. To start loading, take 0.3 gram per kilogram of bodyweight per day for 5–7 days, then follow with at least 0.03 g/kg/day ...


2

Don't waste your money. If you aren't willing to put in 'more than a little' exercise, the impact you'll see from the supplements will be slim to none. If someone told you that you looked bigger while you were taking creatine, that's because creatine causes you to retain slightly more water - so you had a bit more water weight bulking you out, but that's not ...


2

The only side-effect which can occur due to supplementating creatine without a liquid is gastrointestinal distress, probably due to osmotic load, as reported in Res Sports Med. 2008;16(1):15-22. Sprinkling on warm food is most likely no problem. The creatine being stuck on the glass with plain water is most likely due to a 'bad' creatine brand. ...


2

What you need to eat does also depend on your body type (and age). Definitely you'll need protein, the basic building blocks of muscle. You'll want more than one serve per day. Go for at least another in the evening, as well as more lean meats. Try to eat protein with every meal. Also, don't ignore carbs. You need carbs for energy to fuel your ...


2

It makes for better marketing. A diet high in animal proteins likely already has more creatine than can be utilized by the body. According to this article: The typical male adult processes 2 grams of creatine per day, and replaces that amount through dietary intake and fabrication within the body. According to this article: For each kg uncooked red ...


2

I have used C4 quite a bit along side with Creatine as well. Depending on your creatine, C4 won't be giving you that much creatine (I believe it was 1g per scoop). Some people claimed creatine needed a "loading phase" but that hasn't been proven. In fact, the "loading phase" was popularized by companies who wanted to sell more of their product. They would ...


2

I'd use a calculator online to get a fairly accurate idea of your recommended calories and daily macros (protein, fat, carbs). Glutamine has rather minor impacts, most notably affecting cell hydration, immunity, and minimizing DOMS. But those affects are really pretty small. Generally your body makes all the glutamine it can use, and I've heard arguments ...


2

3-5 grams of creatine per day (1 of your pills) is generally considered a safe amount. There has been evidence of liver/kidney damage as a result of taking too much Creatine, but seems to only be the case with people who already have kidney/liver problems. Studies have shown that as much as 20 grams of creatine per day is safe. The only real downside is ...


2

I recommend you check out Examine. It's a supplement encyclopedia, and is a great jumping off point for understanding what a particular supplement is and how it works. Importantly, all of their information is based on the best available research, which is extensively linked. Since you're interested in how the body responds to a particular supplement, you ...


2

LiveStrong.com states that Diuretics are drugs formulated to remove excess water from your bloodstream to ease the pressure against the walls of your veins. Creatine also redirects fluids into the muscles. Thus, when you take diuretics and creatine concurrently, you increase the potential for dehydration and kidney damage. So that could be a concern (...


2

What ever you read, you can take creatine whenever you feel more comfortable. I have taken it in the mornings, and now i take it after workouts, because of bro science. At the end of the day, my results are the same with it. I have also taken a scoop of creatine(when i first started) and a cup of coffee before my work outs and i saw and felt the creatine ...


2

I just wanna add something (i might be wrong, a doctor confirmation would be appreciated) but 98% of mass gainers use high in sugar and high IG carbs as a calorie source. Aka maltodextrine or fructose etc. A high dose of sugar (not carbs, >sugar<) in the very long term can give you diabetes. So if you're like me and need a shitload of calories to pack on ...


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