6

The rectus abdominus works to curl the torso, and bring the lower part of the ribcage forward and down. It is one muscle, and as such, any exercise that curls the body works the entire muscle. The "upper and lower" abdominal belief is pretty much a myth. Whether you curl down towards your legs or up towards your head, the entire muscle is contracting. The ...


6

Consider for a moment that a major job for your abs is not to pull your chest to your knees (crunch and sit up style), but to remain erect and not collapse like when doing a front squat: Crunches and sit ups don't have a large isometric component, as where something like front squats, deadlifts, and planks do. Most of what we want our backs to do in daily ...


5

That looks incredibly uncomfortable. However, there are probably two ways to use this. One is for decline situps, where your knees would go over the bar at the end of the bench and your feet hook under the bar sticking out. Lay back until head touches then elevate towards feet. The second is to lay the opposite way, and grab the bar at the end of the bench ...


5

Your core likes it when all your limbs are close and stable to your body. When you put your arms to the side or behind your head, your core has to work extra hard in order to balance things out. So to answer your question, across your chest will make the exercise easier while behind the head makes it harder and works a bit more stabilizers. Keep in mind, ...


3

As long as you do not pull your head - it does not matter. You can also keep hands side by side, or straight. Try different positions, and choose best for you. From time to time change it - maybe something goes better over time? You can stress muscles isometrically, or move chest and hips closer. That is other topic, but can influence hands position.


3

The main differences I've seen between the two: Crunches: Shorter range of motion, abs are more isolated, little to no lower back movement. Sit-ups: Longer range of motion (more time under tension), involves hip flexors, may involve rounding of the lumbar spine, easier to load with resistance. Of the two, I feel crunches are a better option as there may ...


3

More muscles are used in a sit up but crunches seem to focus on the abdominal muscles more. For myself I can do 2-3 times as many crunches, and always do some crunches after sit ups to continue working some of the muscles. The main group of muscles neglected in crunches seem to be the back and legs. In the military you get 2 minutes to do as many as ...


3

Crunches overdevelop the top 4 ( or crown ) of your 8 pack abdominal muscles, unless you are compensating by doing a lot of lower abdominal exercises. A sit up is also not the best abdominal exercise for core strength. Try V-Ups, Jack knifes, Leg Raises, Weighted Planks, Front Levers, etc.


3

Your muscles need recovery time. However, that varies from person to person. Person A may only be able to lift 3x a week, while Person B can lift everyday. You should probably incorporate 2 days a week with just some light lifting (or muscle groups you don't target) and some cardio, then lift the other days. You probably shouldn't lift the same muscle ...


3

You're probably not maintaining a neutral spine as you attempt to perform your crunches. Be mindful of what you're doing with your head and upper back/cervical spine as you execute the movement. Filming yourself while you perform this exercise (from the side would probably be most beneficial) and looking at your spinal flexion will help you determine whether ...


2

If they are fun, they are more effective because you are more likely to do them. As far as them being more effective in actual muscle building, it all depends on form. If form is correct, then they are not any more or less effective than any other ab isolation exercise done with correct form (With the caveat that cable crunches are often easier to do with ...


2

I think placing the hands behind the head is more difficult for doing crunches than placing hands on the chest. So it's upto you. Placing hands behind the head can cause injuries if you do it improperly that is if you pull your head while doing crunches so be careful and use proper form.


2

Where are you doing this exercise? On the bar or bench. I suggest you doing it on the bench like the second picture because when you hang from the bar you swing back and forth and thats not good for core strengthening. You see that woman is stable because she found multiple bars, so she is not swinging. Doing it like her is okay highly recommended. Upper ...


2

I recommend that you try the McGill Curl Up and the Pilates 100, or the Pilates double leg stretch. I can't say for certain that your back will like them better, but it is time to stop doing the old fashioned crunches and try a new approach. I might also recommend Planks, except that my problem with planks is that almost everyone at my gym does them with ...


1

I've had great success lifting every day. However you need to give your body time to adapt. You can't start lifting as hard as you can every day, you will only hurt yourself. Start with 4 days then slowly add another day as you get used to the stress. Be mindful that your diet and sleeping are on point, they become much more important when you exert ...


1

I would suggest that in addition to regulating the muscle groups accordingly you make sure you warm up properly and stretch too, very important so you do not get hurt. Otherwise lifting weights is good for you. Have a look at muscleandfitness.com for some good workouts and do them carefully and safely. Good luck


1

Pain can be an indication that something is wrong. It is not normal to have pain in your spine during or after crunches. Abdominal muscle soreness could be normal, but not back pain. Upper back pain from doing crunches may be caused by jerking or pulling on the head and neck with your hands to lift the head. If you tend to pull on the head, try changing ...


1

Besides the exercises recommended in the article you cite (planks, bridges, leg-lifts, bird-dogs and "stirring the pot"), full-body exercises that rely on your core muscles are also great ways to improve abdominal fitness, and they often strengthen your back at the same time, thereby helping prevent injury instead of potentially causing it. Some examples of ...


1

You LITERALLY ONLY work your abs on Cable Crunches when you are consciously, tightening and squeezing your abs. Cable Crunches even in the correct "form" will only give a small amount of benefit to your abs. They are however, a GREAT upper back exercise- but ONLY the upper part of the lats.


1

I wouldn't suggest do kneeling cable crunches unless you need the advanced weight to actually engage your abdominal muscles - meaning you are a very advanced lifter or body builder. Anytime that your have that much contact with the floor to settle your body - knees and feet in this case - the more the weight is distributed. In fact I would strongly suggest ...


1

When you get trained to teach classes by a professional (company) they talk about keeping your audience focused and participating. So there are two main reason for switching of exercises: After 10-15 reps a lot of people would zone out and lose focus. I have been told 15 is the magic number but opinions vary. I personally think 12 is a great number ...


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