11

Personally I would look at the leading causes of death in (my case) the United States: Heart disease: 596,577 Cancer: 576,691 Chronic lower respiratory diseases: 142,943 Stroke (cerebrovascular diseases): 128,932 Accidents (unintentional injuries): 126,438 Alzheimer's disease: 84,974 Diabetes: 73,831 Influenza and Pneumonia: 53,826 Nephritis, nephrotic ...


8

Because they're all based off vaguely defined math formulas which were created by various scientists that used questionable methodologies in an attempt to make a generic consensus on what people need to eat. They are best guesses based on a user's age, weight, height, activity level, and sometimes bodyfat percentage. However, everyone's caloric need is ...


7

There really is no "limit" to how many calories that a person can absorb in a day. Using them, however, is where other factors come into play, that are very much dependent on the person. For example, during his heaviest training days, Michael Phelps is reported to be consuming between 10-12,000 calories a day. However, if you don't exercise to meet that ...


5

The frequency of your intake of food doesn't matter. It's a myth suggestions that your metabolism is heightened and keeps your body "burning calories". Actually the levels rise depending on the quantity you eat. Making the sum all the same in the end of the day. With that said, eating your total daily calorie intake in one meal in the morning probably won'...


5

BMI isn't something you use to calculate your personal fitness, it is a statistical measurement and highly inaccurate for personal use. There are a lot of diets that 'speed diet' your weight down and don't care about muscle loss, what counts is the result on your scale to make them look efficient. Safe rates of weight loss are mostly determined by your fat ...


4

It's a tough answer, and it's based around your endocrine system. Your body releases insulin to direct fat cells to increase their storage. If you do not have an endocrine disorder (such as diabetes), your body will become more insulin sensitive as your body fat drops, therefore you will readily store more fat. The more insulin resistant you are, the less ...


4

Eating well under your recommended levels can also be a reason for not losing weight. The body needs a certain amount of calories to simply carry out its daily activities such as breathing, digesting, and keeping up with your physical activities. Every person has an amount of calories required each day to maintain their current weight. People who gain ...


4

If you suppress your calories enough you can enter a "starvation mode", although there are a couple of points I'd make: From the research, it takes a long time to see long lasting impacts from seriously reduced calories (let's say 1/2 of your maintenance needs). The mid-century Minnesota study ran for about a year. The results from that study are rather ...


4

Honestly a lot of this is down to the individual (e.g. You) General recommendations tend to lean towards a protein intake of around 0.8 - 1g per lbs of body weight, so if we say you weight 178lbs, then that's a daily protein intake of about 142 - 178g, push that towards the higher end if you're doing heavy weight lifting. For carbs and fat, I'd start off ...


4

There's a lot of "right" macro values. If anything it's a testament to the flexibility of the human body and what it can handle nutritionally. I'm going to base this discussion around the assumption that you're starting a proper strength training program which is proven to be very effective for fat loss, including compared to aerobic exercise. I'd start ...


4

I'm a personal trainer who has had a lot of clients use these apps, though not as much these days, so I could be a little out of date. By far, the issue I, or my clients, ran into is all hell would break loose the moment they would enter their activity level. The first issue is people way, way overestimate how active they are. For most using these apps, ...


3

First and foremost, I'd like to remind you that fat and weight are not synonymous, but they are related. It is possible to gain weight and lose fat, but it is also difficult. I'm missing critical detail about your trainer, such as who he has trained and the effect he has had on those clients. If your trainer is a reputable person who is specifying your ...


3

If you take a look at A Biometric Study of Human Basal Metabolism, where Harris and Benedict introduced their formula, you will see one important sentence: These equations have been tabulated for values of weight from 25.0 to 124.9kgm. [sic], for stature from 151cm to 200cm., and for age from 21 to 70 years, so that the most probable basal metabolism of ...


3

Food packaging is based on averages it is more or less right sometimes you'll get more calories, sometimes less. Most of your calories are spent on maintaining your body's functions. (About 3/4 in fact) You would have to be doing some incredibly hard exercise to lose weight through exercise alone. The most likely thing is your not tracking your calories ...


3

You're forgetting something VERY important here. As an example, consider this, if someone starts to workout their arms using 20lbs dumbbells (with no previous experience), they will eventually get stronger and the 20lbs will be easier than they were before right? So, now what if that person kept lifting 20lbs even after they got stronger? Do you think they'...


2

Your diet needs significantly more protein. Despite what you may think, it won't make you gain body fat. Quite the opposite actually. When body-builders/fitness models are cutting their body fat they tend to increase their protein and fat intake. For breakfast you should eat regular eggs along with egg whites. It will help with absorption and digestion ...


2

You won't be able to perfectly measure the number of calories you consume every day. Your best bet is use a website, such as MyFitnessPal to get a rough estimate.


2

I find My Fitness Pal to have everything I need, possibly too many features for some, but most of them can just be ignored quite easily. With an extensive database of foods and the ability to scan packaging bar codes and recall recently logged foods, its pretty quick and easy to use. It also has a calculator for recommended calorie intake based on weight, ...


2

This kind of extreme weight loss program, as Larissa mentions, will have a negative impact on your body, and additionally will not be very sustainable. Based on your weight, and your description of your body, a far better path to achieve your goals will be starting a weightlifting program with a controlled diet. While your main goal may be a flat stomach, ...


2

I think that having at least calculated a few of your baseline TDEE values can be beneficial if you're overweight and have gotten your body "used" to under consuming calories based on something like say, willpower for example. Body weight x 24 is an absurd amount, for me that means my body would require roughly 4200 calories for maintenance. My actual ...


2

There are plenty of formulas for calculating required calories. Some are even based on science. However, since every individual has different requirements based upon lifestyle, etc., I find that the best way to control and monitor calories is to become knowledgeable on serving sizes and food content. So, to answer your first question, I would not use a ...


2

Your math is way off, because it's not being applied properly. First, a pound of fat contains 3500 Calories. Most healthy individuals do not eat that in a day unless they are high level athletes who use all of those calories. Never think you are going to lose a pound of fat a day. So we have 1 pound which is roughly equivalent to 454 grams of body weight....


2

Your assumption #2 is wrong. Typical fitness trackers have an error of between 30% and 90% when estimating calorie burn, and exercise machines don't do any better.


2

I would classify you as moderately to very active, depending on how vigorously you are walking. However, I would caution you a bit on rigidly adhering to a specific number, at least once you get a little more into your routines. Take a look at this wiki page and run your numbers using each of the equations, and a moderately active level. Average them all ...


2

Cycling is fine for exercise (if you’re not worried about building muscle), but your diet is far from being a long term solution. Given your statistics, you should be burning roughly 3200 calories a day. Even without any activity whatsoever (lying in bed all day), you should be burning 2000 calories just to function properly. To lose weight long term, you ...


2

Whatever its internal initial formula (even if it cheats!), calorie/kilojoule tracking apps are programmed to alter slightly as they get more data about your habits and your body's response to those habits. The graph that they build of energy in / energy out, and some other key metrics, is all what makes the most difference. It is a matter of constant ...


2

If you're trying to gain weight, I suggest you focus just on eating more. Lifting heavier weights, or the same weights for more reps, would help too. Calculating exactly how much more to eat might be nice, but the main thing is to eat a lot. But no, 2700 calories sounds relatively little for someone your size who works out and wants to get bigger. Eat, ...


2

Considerable debate surrounds what proportion of the energetic macronutrients might represent the ‘ideal’, but let us assume that you are observing a high-protein diet, providing 2.0 grams of protein per kilogram of body mass per day, and let us assume, also, that you would like to maintain a slight energy deficit in order to metabolise fat quickly whilst ...


1

protein, fat, and carbs all contain a different amount of calories per gram protein = 4 carbs = 4 fat = 9 so your math is: protein : 241 * 4 = 964 carbs : 402 * 4 = 1608 fat: 71 * 9 = 639 so total is: 964 + 1608 + 639 = 3211 If those are the macros, it looks like the math on the site might be off by a bit. If you are new to building, then you probably ...


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