16

There are several methods of increasing grip strength, and some of the principles that work the best you should already be familiar with due to the bodybuilding background. First, let's look at what causes grip to fail: Sweat. The sweatier your hands, the more the bar wants to slip out of them. Effective bar thickness. The thicker your bar, the tougher it ...


12

As anything it depends on your goals. As a powerlifter and strongman, I have to lift heavy weights. For Powerlifting it's the heaviest deadlift, but for strongman it could be one set weight for as many reps as I can within a timelimit. That's very different from a bodybuilder who is looking for a better physique, where weight is irrelevant. Addressing ...


11

Grip will eventually be a limiter, but there are things you can do: Hold the bar at the top for an extra 10-15 seconds on your last rep Change your grip to a stronger hold Do grip specific work The first option will help get your grip stronger pretty well. There does come a time when the weight on the bar increases faster than your grip strength, though. ...


11

I'm already squatting (80% my bodyweight) and deadlifting (little more than my bodyweight) as part of Starting Strength program. What else should I do? Absolutely nothing. Keep squatting until you're squatting 150% of your bodyweight. Keep deadlifting until you're lifting twice your bodyweight. Once you reach those goals it would be reasonable to consider ...


10

After reading your comments to John P's quite accurate answer, I think the question you're really asking is "why are deadlifts so much more taxing than squats" (maybe rename the title if I'm accurate on that). If that's the case, I'd offer these up: Deadlifts put much more load on your thoracic spine, arms, shoulders, rhomboids, and hands. You can see ...


10

It's a deadlift, meaning the weight should be dead on the floor. Touch-and-go or otherwise bouncing around is not a deadlift. Personally, I relax my grip and reset on every rep. My hands don't come off the bar, but I open my fingers, ensuring that the weight is indeed dead on the floor. The extra second this adds to each set is negligible and the benefit ...


10

I've often felt there were two aspects to using a weight belt. The first being the psychological sense of security that the belt provides. Belts make us feel “locked in” and ready to lift thus providing a positive framework to perform the lift. The second and more important aspect is the potential support that a belt provides thus reducing the ...


10

The hand should be wrapped around the bar as much as possible, but the wrist would be straight down. I guess that would mean the bar would fall on the palm right under the knuckle of the hand. However, a common issue, especially as the weight gets heavier, is the bar will roll away from the palm. There are a couple strategies people use to mitigate this: ...


10

Yes, it's the right thing to do. Your shoulders should be retracted at the end of a deadlift rep. Those videos have the answer. The deadlift is not finished until you achieve full (but not over-) extension, and that includes thoracic extension. "You can't cheat the [deadlift] by leaving your shoulders forward" is exactly correct. I don't agree that ...


9

You put the most important thing first. If you are working on your press strength, put it first. The advice to put squats first are for people who are brand new to lifting. Squats are the one exercise that take a lot of effort to get right, but have the biggest rewards as far as strength and muscle development go. If you've been lifting for more than two ...


9

If you're deadlifting about as much as you weigh with a double overhand grip, there's no need to worry about your grip as a specific thing. The deadlift itself will develop your grip strength just fine for a while longer, with just a minor tweak or two. The Least Intrusive Grip Improvements The important thing to do is to challenge your grip as much as ...


9

Changing the grip of a deadlift does not greatly change the targeted primary muscles, the exercise allows some significant variation in the grips used. Reversing the grip should not immediately cause you trouble, but it might be a bad idea in the long run for the following reasons: It is a weaker grip. The bar will have a tendency to roll away from your ...


9

Powerlifting competition rules vary from federation to federation, but generally in the deadlift, the lifter is required to hold the bar in the locked out position until signalled by the head judge to lower the bar. At that point, they must lower the bar to the ground in control, which usually just means a fast descent, holding the bar until it is settled on ...


8

This is standard barbell weight training as it has more or less always been. Your first four sets are just warm ups for your one heavy set. If we take my own program as an example I start even lower and end up higher. I calculate my warm up sets by ramping up from 20% (or the weight of the empty bar), 40%, 60% and 80% of my final pull. Even though I ramp up ...


8

A big portion of it is simply the mechanics of the lift. Just try to stand on one leg in a conventional deadlift stance (sumo would be impossible). You run into the big question of what to do with the leg you aren't using. If you stick it in front of you like a pistol, grabbing the bar becomes nearly impossible. If you stick it behind you there is a high ...


8

Deadlifting isn't fundamentally different than any other movement, so train it the same basic way as everything else. Since you're aiming for a combination of strength, athletic-performance, and muscle-size, you'll probably want to vary the protocol (aka the sets and reps to do) - e.g. for 8 weeks, lift for strength, then take a week off, then another 8 ...


8

Main difference is how deep you go. Stiff Leg Deadlift you allow your back to round a bit at the bottom, might even stand on a platform to really emphasize this. Romanian Deadlift is more of a hamstring exercise where you're emphasis is keeping your back straight and forcing your butt backwards. Ideally SLDL is completely straight though not locked out - ...


8

Romanian deadlifts are not synonymous with stiff-leg deadlifts. In the Romanian deadlift, we hinge at the hip and rock backwards, allowing the knees to bend only enough to align our combined centre of mass with our base of support—that is, somewhere between our heel and forefoot, and ideally midway. For large loads—those that are high relative to our body ...


8

The 2019 IPF Technical Rules Book includes these items which will lead to your deadlift being disqualified in a competition (see Page 9 of this PDF): "Failure to lock the knees straight at the completion of the lift." "Failure to stand erect with the shoulders back." You describe a severe amount of agony in ending the deadlift with your ...


7

Using a belt is like training wheels for bicycles. Sure, they will help you increase your weight more quickly then without one, but with proper form and care for your body, you can maintain your skills better. Deadlifting is a exercise that uses many stabilizing muscles, and if you do not have all of them working together, that's an easy road to injury. ...


7

What you need to determine is how many work sets you're doing, not how many total sets. For me, anything south of 250 is more of a warm-up set. I'll do 3 to 5 at 135 or 145, 215 or 225, and in the upper 200s before doing a set (or two) in the 300s. Only that last one is what I consider a work set, which is the one that matters. Doing five sets from 115 to ...


7

Don't Drop Your Deadlift! Don't listen to StrongLifts' recommendation of dropping your deadlift weight by more than 50%. It's a 5x5 program with deadlifts at 1x5, so you should be dropping the weight a little bit, perhaps 20 or 25%, but definitely not from 425 to 190. You would lose strength or at least leave strength gains on the table. With your numbers, ...


7

I just want to add the results of my own "investigations" on the subject (although the answer I accepted is still OK). First, my old injury is gone and the problem was the incorrect form. After reading in Rippetoe's book, I found I could perform Deadlifts easily. Form does matter! Anyway, I found Sumo Deadlifts an easier exercise. And, according to the EXRX ...


7

Lifting gloves get in the way and make your job harder. I recommend going without. Chalk helps enormously to prevent sweat from making the bar hard to grip. Buy a block of rock climber's chalk for a buck. Before each set, use the chalk to "paint" your fingers and the inside of your palm where it meets your fingers. Rub your hands together to work it into ...


7

When I was coached for the deadlift, I was advised that the first inch is the most important, followed by the distance up to the knee line. Past that you're generally in the clear. That's anecdotal, but it's been true for me and most people I've talked to. Answering your question showed me that at (or around) that point, the quads become less dominant and ...


7

A year is plenty of time to hit a double bodyweight deadlift if you're focused on strength. It took me about a year and a half of squatting and deadlifting two to three times a week (alongside other sports and taking several week-or-longer breaks for vacation or injury) to achieve a double bodyweight deadlift at about your weight. So I was training for my ...


7

The common practice stems from the widespread-but-fallacious belief that loaded spinal flexion inherently causes injury, and this belief originates largely from studies of intradiscal pressure in standing, seated, or otherwise spinally-flexed positions of untrained individuals. It is often assumed that we should avoid any and all flexion, extension, or ...


7

There is no single alternative to the deadlift, because the whole point of the deadlift is that it does so many things so dramatically. It can be loaded more than nearly any other exercise. If this is what you're after, then a heavy barbell squat is close. In a home gym, you might be out of luck. Maybe try building an isometric pulling platform. It works the ...


7

Shin splints tend only to be affected by impact exercises—running, skipping, and jumping—or exercises that load the tibialis anterior. Squats and deadlifts should neither aggravate your shin splints, nor be adversely affected by them. If you are squatting deeply, however, the acute dorsi flexion required of the ankles may cause you discomfort. If so, you can ...


6

The difference is in the set up. The full squat is part of the clean deadlift, although the person takes the slack out of their body before the pull so the distinction of a clean deadlift from a conventional deadlift is more of splitting hairs than anything. Your sticking point (or weak point) in the lift is usually dictated by the bar position relative to ...


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