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20

It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), but you'll note the Delayed word there. The pain usually shows up 24 hours later and is gone around 72 hours. It's actually not fully understood (2003 analysis in Sports Medicine): Up to six hypothesised theories have been proposed for the mechanism of DOMS, namely: lactic acid, muscle spasm, connective ...


10

You hit on an important distinction between pain and recovery. Massage may very well make you feel less pain, but that does not mean it will improve your recovery. Many immediately jump to "At least it gets rid of the pain. I'm going to do it." There's a chance that backfires. Many associate pain with recovery. Less muscle soreness? "I'm more recovered." ...


8

Immediately after (like within 30 minutes or sooner) dump a bunch of protein into your system. I like chocolate milk, but anything with protein and carbs and fluid is good. This helps your body recover faster as it starts off will all the raw materials it needs. If you can handle it, a cold bath (ice cold is optimum, but very hard to take) can help reduce ...


6

I've written a previous answer about this, which I would recommend reviewing. In short, DOMS is not a good indicator of muscle stress, growth, recovery, or training effectiveness. It is brought about through a combination of factors, primarily eccentric exercises. From Wikipedia: Muscles undergoing heavy eccentric loading suffer greater damage when ...


5

You can find a lot of great information online - search for "recovery nutrition". There are two areas that are important: First, you need to rehydrate, unless you are one of those rare people who actually drinks enough to stay hydrated on the ride. Second, you need to replace your carbohydrate stores. There is a "golden window" after the end of exercise (...


5

It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), and is a natural consequence of changing either intensity or volume on anything you are doing. It's temporary, and once you get used to the new regular workload you won't get it anymore. It has no effect on your ability to train or carry any risk of injury. It's simply uncomfortable. A little information ...


4

Untrained muscles are not conditioned to doing hard work. It's really that simple. The more hard work you do, the more conditioned your musculature and supporting systems are to doing hard work. People who have physical jobs have muscles that are trained to do their jobs. If that involves carrying heavy objects from one place to another, digging, working ...


4

Often enough a foam roller can accomplish what stretching cannot. I would recommend you add that into your routine


3

Soreness Cherish it. It's not a way of measuring how effective your workout was, but it should tell you that you've done something out of your comfort zone, and that's good! The more you train, the less of it you'll have. But generally, don't worry about it. Sudden weakness This is important. Learn this immediately!! When you train, you break the muscle ...


3

Walking is not leg work (unless you are morbidly obese) and getting sore after squatting a 50lb barbell would imply you need to develop more strength in your legs. If this is all you can squat - which would be weird considering you said "I only care for strength and nothing else as part of my workout" - I have to disagree with Macedon93. You should be ...


3

The obliques mildly assist in flexion of the torso, and part of their attachments include the sheath of the rectus abdominus (abdominal muscle) and the linea alba (tendonous side attachment that serves as a connection and brace for the external oblique and abdominus). The primary thing that they are going to be doing during your deadlift is stabilizing the ...


3

Recover no matter what you do. If you are not sure if it has been long enough, start with your warm ups. If you feel better while warming up, go ahead into your workout. If you have been eating right and resting, then you should be o.k.


2

Honestly, I think you need to start working out more consistently. Every 2 to 5 days is not consistent and if you expect to get results from that, you probably won't. Strength training and muscle gain both require a lot of commitment to both your workout/training and your diet. It varies from person to person but expect 45 to 60 minute high intensity ...


2

If you want to become stronger and/or bigger (muscle-wice) you do not need to do 60 reps. 6-12 reps per set is about right. Burn feeling means little. If you are a beginner , you might find http://stronglifts.com/stronglifts-5x5-beginner-strength-training-program/ program usefull.


2

If you're talking about Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), there's this question and answer that might help you out. Specifically to answer your question though with DOMS you need to break it into prevention and then management once it shows up. Specifically related to massage though: Does massage really help muscle soreness? This 2005 study says yes, ...


2

Between the 17th and 30th of October, almost two weeks have passed. That's far too long of a time period for your muscles to really get used to the movements and resistance. If you want to avoid DOMS, and make better progress, you need to consider working out a lot more often. A good place to start is every 2 days.


2

I wouldn't mess with it too much outside of the gym. Some light stretching just to maintain range of motion is good but be careful not to go too far! You can very easily train through DOMS, if it's just soreness then go through it but if your joints feel terrible or you feel you cannot produce force then it'll be better to rest. In general muscular DOMS is ...


2

First, you make no mention of your training goals or experience, so, I'll assume it's general fitness. With that in mind, I'd say that using DOMS as a goal... “IMHO I think DOMS are awesome, it's like rewarding pain” ...is not appropriate. While there are several posts regarding DOMS on this site, I would refer you to the one I wrote on the ...


2

Though the cause of DOMS still isn't totally understood, most contemporary research suggests that the pain comes from nerve sensitivity caused by bradykinin during the muscle repair process. Having said that, if you're still sore, your body is probably still repairing--let it do its thing. I would hold off on jogging at the pace that's causing the soreness ...


2

Massaging and foam rolling are not identical, but are close enough that foam rolling is often labelled a form of "self-massage". Foam rolling has clinically proven benefits on DOMS-related pain and connective tissue related recovery. Massage appears to have tested benefits on DOMS pain, but not on improving muscle function recovery (these results seem to ...


2

Stay consistent enough and DOMs will start diminishing over time. I personally don't really get them anymore after years. They'll be a minor inconvenience at worst if I do get them. The exception being is if I took a couple weeks off. I'll get then the first workout but they'll go away by the second. Once you have them though, you just kind of have to deal ...


2

L.I.S.S. Cardio (Low Intensity Steady State Cardio) While this type of cardio isn’t the only type that might fit your criteria, I would argue that it imparts the least amount of soreness. Keep in mind that this is called “low intensity” cardio and not “no intensity” cardio. This type of cardio is typically marked by doing the same thing for an extended ...


1

It's called "Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness" (DOMS), keyword being "Delayed". The soreness is caused by eccentric exercise, that is, exercise consisting of eccentric (lengthening) contractions of the muscle. Isometric (static) exercise causes much less soreness, and concentric (shortening) exercise causes none. It's normal for DOMS to occur a day or two ...


1

Exercise breaks down your body a little bit. Done well, it breaks it down the perfect amount that allows your body to repair the damage before the next time you exercise. You can read this answer on how exercise adaptation occurs. Sticking with your archery: If you pick your bow up and put it down, you're not stressing your body. If you fired off a few ...


1

The archery practice tears your muscle fibers. There are two things you need to get that back. Enough proper food Enough rest If one/both of these are not met, your muscles will not be rebuilt properly, and you'll get progressively weaker. It's odd that you experienced this after only 5 days, but it does strongly implies that at least one of the two ...


1

After the DOMS goes away, does it mean that I have gained more strength than before and my body will adapt to the weight? You might benefit from reading my response to a similar question. Although the question refers to a specific body part, the science behind my answer is still the same. To quote from that answer: Current research indicates that ...


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