13

Unless you're running in extreme heat conditions, for 30 minutes to an hour you really don't need any on course hydration. Drink some water beforehand, and afterwards to replenish sweat loss, and you should be fine. I've run up to 2 hours without on course hydration in moderate conditions. There is some evidence that even 2% dehydration can start to cause ...


6

I've reduced my water consumption during bike races to a minimum, see my question about this. I try not to drink anything within the first hour of activity, depending on the temperature this time varies, of course. While running is a bit different from biking I think it isn't absolutely necessary to carry something to drink while running, if you are unsure, ...


6

You are drinking flavored salt water. If it has no calories it can't make you fat but it can make you feel bloated. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sodium/NU00284 Mayo clinic references too much sodium can lead to water retention. So maybe in the short term it could make you retain a percent of an ounce of water in your system. Not fat but maybe ...


4

It does depend on the intensity and duration of your cardio workout. Potatoes are starchy which takes longer to digest and takes longer to replenish those lost carbs. If you are doing back-to-back high intensity workouts i'd suggest the sports drink for quicker replenishment. This becomes a non-factor after a night or day of rest(or even around 6 hours ...


4

Water intake should mainly be used to stave off dehydration, which can happen as early as a 1.5% body weight loss. Depending on how much/quickly you sweat, the time for this to happen can take a short period of time or a long one. Most likely, with exercise under an hour long, you're not going to lose that much water. If you want to see if you're hitting ...


4

Energy Drinks Generally, electrolyte drinks are most helpful for workouts lasting longer than 1.5 hours depending on how much you sweat. The more you sweat, the more electrolytes (sodium/potassium) you flush out and the more likely you are to need replacements. According to this WebMD article: The American College of Sports Medicine says that during ...


4

Yes, absolutely you can overdo it with electrolytes. It's called hypernatremia. The best resource I know of is the 9-way table by Karl King. This shows the effects of being under-, over- or normally hydrated and being under-, over- or normally salted. It shows what the symptoms are and what the treatment is. This table is really useful. You can tell if you'...


4

The word here is you "probably" don't have to worry about overdosing on electrolytes if you are drinking premade sports drinks. They are of a concentration that you would probably not be able to drink any more long before the electrolytes would become an issue. However, if you are drinking sports drinks and supplementing with salt tabs, or some of the other ...


3

If you are getting exhausted and fatigued after only 30 minutes, the problem isn't that you need an energy drink. The problem is that you are working out too hard. The fact that you are feeling tired later in the days would support that. The point of working out is to put training stress on your system. After you have done that, when you rest, you improve....


3

One of the difference between nutrients and sport drinks is that sport drinks are designed in such a way that most of them have approximately %6 Carbs which is the best rate of absorption by the metabolism. On the other hand, it is very difficult to arrange quantity the nutrients such as %6 Carbs from potato chips.


3

It is impossible to say what and how much "is enough" without more detailed information. But in general, if you are exercising at an intensity where you are sweating, then failure to replenish will definitely impact your performance. Coconut water is well studied and one of the most natural hydration substances available. I just wanted to mention it ...


3

1, 2: "Electrolytes" is just a fancier word for salts, which you will get in large amounts through your diet, especially if you eat a typical western diet. Unless you're exercising for two hours or more, the only one who's benefiting from your electrolyte drink consumption are the companies who sell them. 3,4: Total amount and distribution throughout the ...


1

If you enjoy coconut water, feel free to drink it after your workout. It's a nice post-workout snack, as are drinks like Gatorade and Powerade, but these can all be substituted with a small meal instead. From your description of your fatigue, it sounds like a small meal would better suit your needs. There's a wide variety of options; I'm partial to a protein ...


1

There is no single cause of cramps, but there are several known causes. Both WebMD and Ask.com have overlapping reasons. Poor blood circulation Overexertion of a muscle Exercising in the heat Dehydration Potassium/Magnesium deficiency Malfunctioning nerves I remember reading a long time ago that it's less about a potassium/magnesium deficiency and more ...


1

Being tired throughout a day is not normal even your workouts are intense. I had a very similar issue, I was feeling very tired after my workouts. Later on, I figured out that I have high blood pressure problem. Please go to a doctor and get checked your body up, especially your heart. Drinking energy drinks is not the real solution and may worsen the ...


1

If I were you I would use more fruits and vegetables instead, you can make fresh squeezed juices. I remember a pic a have posted a month ago on on my facebook wall about Ironmanner (Ironman Triatloner) who has done whole competition on 10 bananas.


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