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How does [someone] prepare to do 110 pull ups in a row Start by recognizing this as an extreme goal. I bet the people achieving >75 pull-ups got there by doing gymnastics or bar calisthenics for years. Coming even close to this number of pull-ups in one set is such a rare skill that you shouldn't ask anyone who hasn't done it. (Elite training is so ...


4

The notion that low-intensity stead-state endurance work is required to elicit an increase in stroke volume is an outdated one, an assumption made from early observations that stroke volume appeared to ‘plateau’ at around 40% of VO₂max. However, a large body of research has since demonstrated that no such plateau exists, especially amongst elite-level ...


4

You could keep your bodyweight mass down, lose fat if you have any, and do several lat exercises such as landmine rows with t bar, or lat bars, one armed rows, etc. Use an endurance type rep scheme(15-20). Working your forearm strength and grip as well as core and biceps to some degree with additional training. Try adding weight here and there but focus more ...


4

I imagine it has something to do with him being a full-time professional athlete with multiple full-time coaches optimizing his training.


3

No, because it would be impossible for a fight to be of such low intensity and long duration that slow twitch fibres would have an advantage. Slow twitch fibres are only advantageous during prolonged submaximal (aerobic) exercise activities like long distance running and cycling. So in a 50km bicycle race, comparing two people with different fibre type ...


3

I think you're vastly underestimating the endurance capabilities of fast twitch muscle fibres. A person's proportion of muscle fibre types is not as limiting as you think it is. Type I ("slow twitch") muscle fibres generate ATP (the fuel that the muscle uses) primarily through the aerobic energy system, and have a slower speed of contraction and ...


3

Say MJ sprinted and slam dunked. He then used all his muscle fibers both fast twitch and slow twitch. After that followed say 3 minutes of running around at moderate speed. During this time his fast twitch fibers were recovering and he was only using his slow twitch fibers. After the 3 minutes had passed he was ready for another sprint and slam dunk. This ...


2

Above all else, your training should consist of a gradually increasing weekly volume of walking, the key requirement of which is recovery. I would recommend three sessions per week, consisting of two tempo walks, and one long-distance walk to train your endurance. The most sensible way to organise your week would be, for example: tempo walk rest tempo walk ...


2

Don't. If you can do 100 pullups, unless you're doing it to prove a point or show off, training to do 110 is a huge waste of time, because the majority of your time is spent slowly reaching your limit, at which point gains can be made. Instead, make the exercise harder until you're reaching your limit at, say, ten reps. For pullups, perhaps make moves ...


2

Studies have shown that caffeine causes a dose-independent improvement in endurance performance1,2,3, which means that you get the same effect from taking a very large dose as you would with taking a small dose, presumably above some minimum threshold dose. (And the maximum dose given in these studies, with no negative effect on performance demonstrated, was ...


2

Improve overall health through fitness (for me this would include losing some weight, I hover around 190lbs as a 6'0" male, ~37 years of age). Maintain decent strength for a variety of activities. Become better at endurance athletics, in particular, running. I'll address these in a different order than you have posed. Running Simply put, the way to get ...


2

I think this question has more to do with why a person with a lot of fast-twitch muscle types have higher stamina. Especially if you pair it with this question. First, there are actually three types of muscle fibers. Type 1 (slow-twitch), type 2a (fast-twitch), and Type 2b (super-fast-twitch. Also called Type 2x). Type 2a is kind of an in between between ...


2

I can't remember who it's from, but there's a quote about this. Something like: Wrestlers and other athletes are in shape, but boxers are always the fittest athletes. Why? If a runner gets tired, he loses the race. If a wrestler gets tired he gets pinned. But if a boxer gets tired, he gets the ever-loving shit beaten out of him. Combat sports are ...


1

I'm not able to answer your question definitely, but here's a thought experiment with squats. Strong person has a squat PR of 200kg Weak person has a squat PR of 40kg Who do you think will manage more reps with a weight of 40kg? So i'd say, all else equal then yes, the stronger person also has more stamina.


1

Injuries can certainly hinder our training routine, but endurance is something you can continue to practice! Mental endurance can be just as important as physical endurance, and they tend to work hand-in-hand. Our mental fortitude contributes to our ability to withstand prolonged physical effort. Given your injury is currently physically limiting, it is a ...


1

In my opinion, there is no definite answer. Look throughout the history of running performance. You will see that seemingly opposite methods led to similar results e.g. Lydiard with high volume base period and then peaking with high intensity pre-competition. Then you've got someone like Igloi who builds everything with intervals. Credit to Science of ...


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