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24

Energy metabolism is not a very well understood system in the sense that while the biochemical reactions are well known, their dynamics is highly variable depending on the individual. I find it disturbing that so many people have their own understanding of how their body work, without any sound reasoning behind it. Below I'll try to give some background ...


7

One way of looking at aerobic function is as the bodies ability to burn fat for fuel at a given pace or speed. Anaerobic function then is the bodies ability to burn sugar for fuel when we move beyond the pace at which we can burn primarily fat. Heart rate is often a good indicator of which mode we're in. Intervals and speed training, then, burn mostly sugar ...


7

Your question doesn't sound like you are overweight and need to watch your calories. In my opinion you could replace the brownie with some whole grain energy bar, replace the simple sugars with some more complex carbohydrates and maybe have some additional fibers, too. But the question is if you should. I think this is more a mental thing, the boost ...


7

I will do my best to address this question in a practical manner. Namely, I think the best way to burn fat and spare muscle while training is to construct a hypocaloric diet and workout plan with muscle preservation in mind. Steps I would take: Ensure diet is hypocaloric so that you actually lose weight over time. Continue weight training while dieting. ...


7

There really isn't a convenient time to workout no matter who you are. It's a lot of work, you get sweaty, you need to change your clothes, and it usually involves going somewhere other than your home or work. I try to do strength training three days a week, usually around ~3pm. The gym is empty, I can actually get in and out much faster than the busier ...


6

Should you switch to something less enjoyable but healthier? That depends on how much you enjoy it, and how integral to your habits this has become. If you find yourself "going to the gym so you can eat a brownie", then the brownie has probably become integral to your exercise as a reward for your workout habit. Exercising regularly is better for you than ...


6

It's a fallacy that fat people unleash bigger bolts of strength. Can fat people hurt you? Absolutely! Why? Because Force = mass X acceleration and fat people have a higher mass; with a decent speed, the force generated can hurt you. It's the same reason why a fat person will injure you if they sit on you; the force (weight = mass X gravity) the weight exerts ...


6

Don't go home Stop at the gym before going home. If you go home, your mind tells you your work day is done, and you give yourself permission to crash. If you go to the gym before going home, you're still in the "Get things done" mindset. Change your timing You might find it easier to go before work, or later in the evening after you've had dinner and ...


6

While this is a very limited study (i.e. n=1), it is the only actual quasi-scientific case study that shows trail running versus normal running, and it indicates that there is about a 12% increase in energy expenditure when running trails versus flat terrain. Indirect calorimetry during ultradistance running Now, I would consider this an interesting data ...


5

Technically speaking, the energy used by the muscles is not glycogen, but the phosphate bonds in adenosine triphosphate (ATP). When energy is needed, one of the phosphate bonds is broken, resulting in an energy release and the creation of the subsequent adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and waste materials. This is one of the main reasons that creatine phosphate ...


5

It goes without saying (?) that these rep ranges are to some kind of failure. The idea is that failure occurs because some system is depleted/damaged and with rest it will be repaired and eventually strengthened. 1-3 reps is thought to stress out your neurotransmitters so you fail and the body's response is improved nerves and muscle recruitment that ...


5

Glycogen. Glycogen is stored glucose that your muscles use to move explosively. Moving heavy weights requires a lot of energy to be expended really fast. Your muscles use the stored glycogen to get that energy. You deplete it throughout the day, and you won't replenish it if you don't eat. Then you don't have enough when you workout, and you feel exhausted. ...


4

I doubt that one granny smith apple will affect your energy, although it might make you feel better, which might in turn improve performance. I don't think that it will be significant in terms of the bad effects associated with overconsumption of sugar. There are a number of implied sub-questions in your post so the answer is complicated: Will eating an ...


4

Your premise is a bit off. Protein and Carbohydrates have essentially the same number of Calories. It's fat that has more calories. Protein: 4 Cal/g Carbohydrates: 4 Cal/g Fat: 9 Cal/g In order to understand how Atkins and other ketogenic diets work, you need to understand a bit about energy systems and a very important pair of hormones. Oversimplifying ...


4

It is still confusing, because both terms (with and without the kilo- prefix) covers the same amount, and it is only a capital letter that differentiates beween 1 and 1000. This would be equal to having Gram (with a capital letter) and kilogram being the same, and gram being 1/1000 of that. I hopy everyone can see how stupid that would be, and this is ...


4

5 hours of any workout would exhaust you for the rest of the day. Now regarding what to do next? Eat food to help you with your calorie needs and if possible, take a nap. That may not remove all the exhaustion, but would give you enough energy to get other things done.


4

The basic idea of an energy gel is to help maintain your blood sugar levels without you having to stop to eat something. It has to be easy to swallow and to digest. Our body absorbs simple carbohydrates faster than complex ones. If a particular gel has different types of carbohydrates (like glucose, maltodextrin, fructose, etc.), you'll absorb them even ...


3

If you take a look at A Biometric Study of Human Basal Metabolism, where Harris and Benedict introduced their formula, you will see one important sentence: These equations have been tabulated for values of weight from 25.0 to 124.9kgm. [sic], for stature from 151cm to 200cm., and for age from 21 to 70 years, so that the most probable basal metabolism of ...


3

It means the equation isn't perfect, but just an estimation. You happen to have found one case where it fails quite a bit. Of course, it doesn't help that you didn't describe an actual human being (the shortest verified person is 54.6cm, that is 21.5 inches). I don't feel like doing the path, but I'm sure the formula provide reasonable estimations for ...


3

Snack on food with a low Glycemic index (most fruits and vegetables, legumes/pulses, whole grains, nuts, fructose) instead. From Wikipedia: A lower glycemic index suggests slower rates of digestion and absorption of the foods' carbohydrates and may also indicate greater extraction from the liver and periphery of the products of carbohydrate ...


3

They are both correct, however, the way they are stated is the source of confusion. 1) There is no correlation between the number of fibers and the energy system used. There is actually an exogenous explanation. The increased recruitment of muscle fibers occurs due to an increase in tension of the muscle. I.e. the force production is increased. When you are ...


3

The first thing I would look at is your food: {Breakfast: 2 pieces of brown bread with extra light spread and pinches of sugar+2 egg whites,and a cup of coffee(70kcal), mid morning : an apple/orange/pears, Lunch:Veggie with salad/Cuscous with vegetable/ half cup of rice with vegetable and salad (not often)+ another cup of cappuchino (3 in one); after gym ...


3

1, 2: "Electrolytes" is just a fancier word for salts, which you will get in large amounts through your diet, especially if you eat a typical western diet. Unless you're exercising for two hours or more, the only one who's benefiting from your electrolyte drink consumption are the companies who sell them. 3,4: Total amount and distribution throughout the ...


3

It is hard to say what the reasons for your problems are. It is impossible to give personal correct answer without knowing you. But I can give you some advices which helped me: Eat and drink enough before you start your training, if you have too little energy it is like going through hell. Your Training has to be suitable for yourself, if you are a ...


3

It sounds overwhelmingly likely that the caloric deficit that lead to the 3kg/2weeks was a bit too much. (For reference, caloric deficit means we consume less calories than we spend per day.) If your goal is continued weight loss, I would recommend adding some more carbohydrates to your diet. Yes, it means increasing your caloric intake, but like I said, ...


3

First of all, you need to have break days. You are working out all 7 days a week, and that way your body doesn't get enough rest to recover. It's not any specific recovery, but the recovery of your system to prepare for the next workout. I know some people who workout all 7 days a week and are doing fine, but in your case, it's not the same are you feel ...


3

I'm going to stab in the dark and assume you are getting home-cooked-style meals (which usually have around a 20:40:40 protein, carb, fat macronutrient split). I don't need a calorie counter to tell you that you are cutting pretty hard with that diet, by restricting both fat and carb intake and trying to fill your calorie needs for the day through protein. ...


2

It sounds like you've reached the tipping point, and are possibly overtraining at times. Long training sessions will cause a rise in cortisol levels, putting your body into a catabolic state. This will make you feel tired and can even stunt muscle growth. Cortisol levels rise when the body is put under stress. Of course inconsistency plays a big part as ...


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