13

Minimum height You need to be able to hang from the bar and not touch the ground with your knees. Maximum height You need to be able to pull yourself all the way up, chest touching the bar, and still have at least an inch or two of space between your head and the ceiling or anything else. Optimal height It's great to be able to just barely reach the bar ...


12

I found the owners manual. Check out page 36: The [below] chart shows the actual weight you are lifting when the ratios are applied. To find the actual weight you are lifting you would come down from the ratio being used and across from the number of the weight plate you have pinned. The top plate weighs just under 41 pounds, and all the other plates ...


10

I've often felt there were two aspects to using a weight belt. The first being the psychological sense of security that the belt provides. Belts make us feel “locked in” and ready to lift thus providing a positive framework to perform the lift. The second and more important aspect is the potential support that a belt provides thus reducing the ...


10

Wow, you're lucky! Kudos to your gym for acquiring one of these. I wish my gym had one too. What is that? It's commonly referred to as a "bamboo bar" because of its resemblence. It's actually plastic, as I'm sure you've surmised if you've tried it out. Eric Spoto (one of the best bench pressers in the world) is a strong advocate for incorporating the ...


9

At a first glimpse the standing desks seem like another "improvement" companies throw to an item to make customers upgrade and re-buy the same thing. Essentially it's just a desk, right? That's what I thought until I started my current job which provided me with a standing desk. My job is sedentary and very static. I experimented and on some days remained ...


9

A recent meta-analysis of 23 published studies is MacEwen, MacDonald, and Burr, "A systematic review of standing and treadmill desks in the workplace," Preventative Medicine 70(January 2015):50-58. The article is here: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.11.011 Quoting from the paper's summary: Treadmill desks led to the greatest improvement in ...


8

It definitely depends on the construction of your house. Some home features require extra care, such as grand pianos and hot tubs. Essentially, anything that puts a large amount of weight in a relatively small area. Covering the whole workout area with another layer of 5/8" plywood will help provide additional rigidity and disperse the weight better. ...


8

How much weight are you talking about? A good test is if you bounce on the floor do you go through it? Seriously, I would recommend a plywood platform to keep your floor from getting messed up, make sure you put padding under it and that it's thick/strong enough for your weight plus the rack plus the max weight you plan on lifting. Make sure that any ...


8

I'm thinking about buying a mat myself so I thought I'd share my research so far. As expected different the price is determined by material, thickness and size. Different mats are appropriate for different types of exercises. If you want to do some general exercises like sit-ups a 'general' exercise mat will do. The thickness of these mats varies between 1 ...


7

Purely a 'by experience' answer here, having tried both: Advantages of a thinner mat: More sturdy foundation for balancing Far less bulky when rolled up for transport/storage Dries quicker from sweat/moisture (especially important in Bikram) Advantages of a thicker mat: Knee cushioning when kneeling Tops of the feet cushioning when sitting on your heels ...


7

The ball bearings allow the weights to rotate without the bar in your hand needing to rotate. As you move a weight in most exercises, unless you have amazing form, some amount of rotational energy will be transfered to the weight. This is true in Olympic lifts even if you have perfect form. If the weight was not allowed to move freely, you would need to ...


7

Pro Dumbbell Allows for a more natural movement. You can do more movements. Could not do flies with a bar... A seasoned lifter does not need a spotter. Work your fixator/balancing muscles more. Force you to use each side equally. Can really help if you have a muscle imbalance. Can help stress smaller muscle groups. Stretches muscles better (with correct ...


7

According to Dr. Jos Verbeek of The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, "What we actually found is that most of it is, very much, just fashionable and not proven good for your health."


6

I've been climbing, training for climbing, and reading books on the subject for a long time. If you are new to climbing, you need as much volume at the easiest grades possible. This is the best way to condition all of your body, as well as improve your technique. Go to the gym, do all of the easiest problems. Repeat them over and over. This will make ...


6

This is a great question! As far as muscle recruitment goes, the bent-over barbell rows do yield the most muscle activity for the lats (back) and the biceps during EMG (electromyographic studies); however, this is only when you comparing with other bent-over row exercises (dumbbell, cable, etc.). Regarding the most effective lat and bicep exercises, ...


6

No. I was a manager/trainer at a couple of Gold's gyms. Our insurance company wouldn't allow these on the floor. They are actually good to hold very moderate weight for several different lifts. The problem is they can take little to no horizontal force and when the squat racks get full people would spill to these. And to make matters worse it is hard ...


6

Octagonal plates interfere with proper strength training Octagonal plates have no reason to exist, and are actively counterproductive to working out properly. Octagonal or otherwise non-round plates make many fundamental barbell exercises from the floor--including cleans, snatches, and most importantly deadlifts--awkward. Upon putting plates down, the bar ...


6

Heart rate monitors can be broadly classified into thee groups based on how they communicate with the fitness equipment. They are - Bluetooth - Most latest HRMs these days use bluetooth to communicate with the fitness devices, including fitness watching and gym equipment. If you use the latest models, it is very likely that they use bluetooth. One extra ...


5

The biggest enemy is rust. Inspect the equipment for signs of rust, and either remove the rust or replace the pieces. Plan on replacing the cables--after 10+ years in the elements, they are probably too weak to trust. Inspect the rust damage on the structural pieces. If the rust damage is only on the surface, you can simply remove the rust with a chemical ...


5

I sweat a lot. When my grip slips because of sweat, I blame the sweat and not the bar. This approach works pretty well. I wear sweat-bands on my wrists and carry chalk. I wipe the sweat from both sides of my hands onto a towel or my shirt, then chalk my palms copiously. This keeps my grip mostly dry.


5

Unfortunately, not all bands are the same. If the cord is made for the purpose of exercise, then the band simply won't stretch anymore if you are at the end of its elasticity. I can't tell you what that length is for the cord you purchased. I use "Iron Woody" bands, and the loop is about 4 ft. These bands can easily handle the type of exercise you are ...


5

Actually, height is largely genetic. However, nutrition is what impacts it from en environmental standpoint, and not exercise (it has a slight effect, assuming you are not a professional powerlifter, marathon runner or the like). So no, you cannot increase height by doing certain exercises. The notion that training basketball or volleyball makes you taller ...


5

In short - belt gives better stabilization. Why not to use it? Well, you wish to have great stabilization... You would like to use that muscles, not to support them. Is it cheating - since that is legal - it is not cheating. Same as wrist/knee stabilization, special pants. All that helps you lift higher values - if that is your target? On the other hand ...


5

Anecdotal, I've been using a standing desk for about a year. I write software so it used to be ~8hrs sitting. Now I'm always standing. Dont notice a difference tbh. Some days my legs and lower back are sore if I happened to walk to work that day. If anything, now when I sit for a long time my lower back feels some soreness on getting up.


5

Being immobile in one position (whether sitting or standing) for long periods of time is just not good for you. Sit too long and you get all those posture problems and what not. Stand too long and blood pools to your calves. The natural state of man is to go between periods of rest and motion. Either you are laying around loafing or MOVING (walking, ...


5

You'll do less; 5" diameter will be pretty hard to grip. Also, branches generally aren't totally flat so it will be a little off-balance. I'd consider picking up a set of gymnast rings to hang from the tree branch. With some rings, you get a few advantages: They're even in height. You can do pullups. You can do ring dips. You can do a host of other ...


5

The terminology That would be a supported sissy squat. The difference between a supported and a "free" sissy squat is nicely illustrated here: Image courtesy of legendfitness.com Does it replace hip thrusts? No, not at all. The sissy squat is a heavily quadricep-focused exercise. In fact, it's what a lot of people use to downright isolate the ...


4

The thickness of your yoga mat has a lot to do with how comfortable it is — too thin, and your knee may get banged up during crescent lunge. The tradeoff is that thick yoga mats (some as thick as 1/4 inch) can make it harder for you to feel a strong connection to the floor, making you more wobbly. Otherwise, it really just depends on whether you want a bulky ...


4

I'd recommend to buy the mat in a store so you can touch and feel a sample mat. How will you have to carry it? The thinner the mat, the easier it'll fit in a single bag together with your other stuff. Some considerations in case you sweat a lot: For yoga/stretching/pilates/... you sometimes have to roll up the mat to a very specific height (less than ...


4

This a multitude of things you can use. Here's a list that I suggest: Lifting straps Chalk Sand (I do this when I do my spartan races, right before the pull up bars) Of course, if there isn't any sand, I suggest bringing a little chalk to rub on your hands before you do your chin ups. This dries up your hands and enables you to lift yourself much easier. ...


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