17

Will the above routine be considered over training? No, because it's impossible for a routine to be considered overtraining. Even a program as obviously impossible for mortals as "600 sets of 3 back squats at 95% 1RM, 7 days a week, with a marathon for cardio" isn't overtraining, because programs aren't overtraining, an individual trainee's ...


9

The good news is that there is more than one way to achieve your goals. That means that you can have two answers that vary within a certain degree and they will both be right. In short, there is no "best". The related question that @Informaficker linked to in his comment applies to this conversation. It's also important to understand that many successful ...


6

I've been climbing, training for climbing, and reading books on the subject for a long time. If you are new to climbing, you need as much volume at the easiest grades possible. This is the best way to condition all of your body, as well as improve your technique. Go to the gym, do all of the easiest problems. Repeat them over and over. This will make ...


6

Yes, you will see improvements, but they will be slow. The residual training effect table on exrx.net (found here, screenshot below) describes how the body retains changes in body state and motor control after ceasing to exercise for a certain time period: The table shows a 15 day (+/- 5 day) retention period on strength endurance. This is defined as: ...


6

If there aren't at least a few studies backing up contrast showers/black cumin/black magic/other things you read about online, assume it's bullshit, it almost always is. What kind of exercise are you doing? The best way and timing of recovery varies a lot depending on wether it's resistance training, marathon running or football... Either way, you'll ...


5

The amount of calories you burn in a given time depends on how much actual physical work you do in that time, not on what type of exercise you do or how fast you do it. When on hypocaloric diet, you can lose some muscle mass during endurance training, but less likely during resistance exercise (Table 1, PubMed, 2017). High-protein diet can help you prevent ...


5

No. 1.5 miles isn't that long but is good to burn some extra calories. Just be sure to change up which muscles you are using (Not only Upper Body for example) in your strength session, then this is a good routine. Overtraining would be if you workout that much that your body can't recover from the damages you are doing to it during your workouts. I wouldn't ...


5

Within the narrow focus of just strength training, the Rippetoe & Kilgore definition is useful: Simply put, a novice, as we use the term here, is a trainee for whom the stress applied during a single workout and the recovery from that single stress is sufficient to cause an adaptation by the next workout. The end of the novice phase is marked by a ...


5

Your muscles require exercise followed by rest and recovery in order to promote muscle growth. Too long or too short of a recovery period and they won't adapt (i.e. get bigger). Going only two days a week to the gym, the best bang for your buck would be a full-body workout on two non-consecutive days minimizing the rest time between both workouts. Think ...


4

The main factor for muscle hypertrophy is volume. It doesn't matter which order you use in your workouts while training as long as your muscles are getting sufficient stimulus for growth. As @mjb in comments as said, you there is no method which is 'better' here. I'd like to repeat the same thing. However, the option 2 is the better split for someone who ...


4

(In this answer I am only addressing muscle growth.) Muscle growth occurs on a per need basis within certain genetic and environmental parameters. Presenting a challenge to the muscles (typically by training) creates a stimulus for growth. Environmental factors (relative to the muscle tissue) such as stress and nutrition can promote or discourage additional ...


3

The biggest thing you have is a back to back session of Wednesday/Thursday. My knowledge of Crossfit is that the focus is on General Physical Preparedness (GPP), so the whole body is being hit every time. I would expect Thursday to be the day you struggle the most due to residual fatigue from Wednesday's session, but if that's not the case then the culprit ...


3

In general, the best indicator that you can return to practice is that you feel more positive about it. However, since you have been "addicted", you should be suspicious of your feelings and have some measurable "toll gate" indicators, e.g. social life, less fatigue and less sleep problems, before you go back to the gym. Also, I would get a system in place ...


3

on the question about the seemingly contradictory practices of recovery but also frequent GtG, this article has some good info: http://breakingmuscle.com/strength-conditioning/greasing-the-groove-how-to-make-it-work-for-you It may seem counterintuitive as we often hear how we need to avoid overtraining. However, if we are not training to failure our ...


3

Seems your best bet would be to use resistance bands. Figure out your max with the strongest resistance band. once you have established this number than do your sets throughout the day with 60-75% of that number. As you increase your repetitions over time use lighter resistance bands and then eventually no resistance bands at all.


3

The Norwegian frequency project shows that training the same muscles 6 times a week granted almost double to strength gains than training 3 times a week Well, yes and no. It doesn't seem like they're training more. They're really training less, but more often, so it evens out. As stated in the article; Both groups did the exact same program. The only ...


2

Chad gave a lot of good advice - the best way to build more climbing endurance is to climb more, even if you have to do laps on the easier routes. But you might also want to suppliment your climbing with some basic training for pullups and your abs. Technique is necessary, but "correct technique" sometimes depends on a certain threshold level of strength....


2

Most of the good answers given have touched on the exercises (and repetitions) you need to build muscles and strength. That being said, none of the answers have touched on these: body weight exercises . Pull ups and chin ups: Do 20 of these daily and in one month, you should noticeably see bulges on your lateral muscles (the upper part of your V-shape)....


2

I'm going to preface my answer by saying I am not as familiar with bodybuilding programming. However, I can answer some of your questions from a more general strength training perspective. Regarding @Jeremy Likeness' quote, the strategy behind both power lifting and weightlifting programming is to be able to recruit as many muscle fibers as possible. In ...


2

Consider doing each movement at less than 100% of failure and then your conditioning improves increase you can levels. Also use longer breaks in between movement as need but not to long. These breaks will also reduce inverse to the increase in stamina. It sounds like you have a structure routine that will do overall body or groups of muscles. If you only ...


2

With an indoor rower, it's going to be much the same as cycling on a trainer or swimming. They will all be low impact, so presuming that you have a history of endurance training, you shouldn't have a problem adding in the 45 minute workouts 6-7 days a week. The two things that really affect recovery are impact and intensity. Since you are on an indoor rower,...


2

What you describe is called "super-setting" and sometimes a "barbell complex". It's a tried and true approach to training, particularly when working with assistance exercises or focusing on conditioning. There are a few things to consider with super-sets: There is a major conditioning component to them, which can cause you to fatigue faster. Planning ...


2

While the weight you can lift on the second exercise of the day will be "remarkably diminished", the effect of these lighter lifts will not be. Performing these lifts in a fatigued state is a good way to focus on endurance and technique (as LarissaGodzilla mentioned), and is far better than not performing the second lift at all. Another added benefit I have ...


2

When I do a three-day push/pull/legs split, I do squats on leg day and deadlifts on pull day. It's for exactly the reason you're asking about. Squats and deadlifts on the same day would be too much. This way, each of the three days is anchored by a big compound lift at the start: bench press on push day, deadlift on pull day, and squat on leg day. In a two-...


2

Depends a lot on how long you've been training, and what level of technique you have right now. Assuming you can make some technical gains as well as strength wise gains, and assuming you're quite new to lifting I'd say you can increase by about 15-25% in 3 months, i.e. bench 60-65 kg etc. I would suggest including leg exercises and avoiding the isolation ...


2

Edit: The assumption is that you are healthy, and have no weight issues, especially that you are not over-weight, and not too old. Supposing you have 10 minutes to train per "break" (not really a break any more...), the maximum amount of push-ups you will possibly be able to do (down the road) during one single break is perhaps around 400 to 800 push-ups. If ...


2

As suggested by smith288, I too will suggest you to give rest to muscles at least 24hrs(its training experts advice). You need to make sure you don't train for for the same muscles within 24 hrs as your muscles need time to relax.


2

Once a week, provided you are going heavy enough and build up to a heavy set of 1-5 gradually. I would recommend the following progression for you: Starting at a working weight 40kg for 5 reps, increase by 5kg each week once you have completed all sets successfully in the previous week. Complete at least 3 warm-up sets at below your current working set ...


2

You should run a calculation to determine your Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE). This calculation will estimate how many calories you need every day in order to maintain weight, and thus going over will result in your weight increasing while going under will result in your weight decreasing. A TDEE Calculation works by factoring in your activity level ...


1

Ok, so given your comment, I think it's safe to assume that your APT is caused by long periods of sitting. Luckily, there are many things we can do to correct this, that doesn't necessarily require going to the gym, but doing so is a bonus. Identifying anterior pelvic tilt (APT) Root cause I think it's wise to understand the cause of sitting-induced APT. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible