New answers tagged

1

Consider a knee: The meniscus absorbs much of the shock of jumps and landings. Tears in the meniscus is a common cause of surgery. Sports with high risk of meniscus tear include american football, soccer, basketball and wrestling. Altough running is high impact this injury do not seem to be common here. Rather it seems that rotation of the knee and ...


2

A Zen parable: A student once asked his teacher, "Master, what is enlightenment?" The master replied, "When hungry, eat. When tired, sleep." Going to bed at 10 at night seems fine. Sleep is when you recover -- getting enough sleep is critical for fat loss, building strength, and performing well mentally and physically. Nothing wrong ...


2

Exercising is good for you for a myriad of reasons that act through an impressive numbers of processes. Understand that mental and physical health are closely related and intertwined. You cannot separate one from the other. They affect each other in a way that I think we severely underestimate nowadays. However, for the sake of a clearer explanation, I will ...


1

In addition to what other answers already say, I think there's a point to be made: Our bodies DO wear out with heavy use. If you push your body to its limits every day, it does tend to wear out. If you go to gym every day without a proper training regimen designed to alleviate these kinds of issues, you start to accumulate muscle damage, joint damage and so ...


0

It's important to consider all of muscles, joints, tendons, and ligaments for recovery. In particular for untrained and overweight individuals. While it might be fine to train with light soreness muscle-wise, it might not be with respect to your joints, tendons, and ligaments, which in general require more time to recover than muscles. Hence, if your muscles ...


3

I think you're barking up the right tree: The body is made of many different chemicals, so logically some parts will wear faster than others. And the body can try to repair some parts, but not others (no new eyeballs, for example). Following, certain exercises might be good for certain body parts while be arguably bad for others. And the degree of exercise ...


3

It could be partly related to resource conservation. For example, if your body waits for activity in a particular muscle group to cue the growth of those muscles, it doesn't waste calories building muscle mass in excess of the strength that you actually need, which would be particularly important in times of scarcity. Another hypothesis, perhaps better ...


7

This is an interesting question that had me thinking for a while. It's difficult to answer "why" exactly, other than saying "it is that way", so I'll try to describe the need for exercise and a few benefits it gives. @Alec's answer has neatly addressed your questions about wear and tear so I won't address those. One of the things humans ...


29

You hit on some common misconceptions, but you also hit on some truths. For instance, you compare the human body to inanimate objects with respect to damage, but you also accurately point out that Obviously, living organisms are not the same as inanimate objects So, what's the difference? The repair process Man-made objects tend to wear out faster with ...


Top 50 recent answers are included