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1

In examining any posture, it helps to imagine what would happen if there were no muscles or fasciae—that is, in this case, if there were just a skeleton hanging in a prone position with its arms held laterally and posterior to the spine, with the spine hyperextended, and legs held straight. We can thereby ask ourselves, what would happen to the skeleton? The ...


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For any readers who don't know what a back lever is, here's an image from Wikipedia. In its most basic form, you simply hold this pose statically. I believe the chest and shoulders are literally at rest when holding a back lever because if one has any level of latissumus dorsi developed the lats, their size and volume will get in the way and will work like ...


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(In this answer I am only addressing muscle growth.) Muscle growth occurs on a per need basis within certain genetic and environmental parameters. Presenting a challenge to the muscles (typically by training) creates a stimulus for growth. Environmental factors (relative to the muscle tissue) such as stress and nutrition can promote or discourage additional ...


0

To answer your question plainly: no, the gluteus maximus is not the only muscle that can accomplish hip extension in this position. All three hamstrings muscles—semitendinosis, semimembranosis, and biceps femoris—are bi-articular, originating on the ischial tuberosity of the hip bone, and inserting on the medial surface of the tibia or lateral surface of the ...


1

A cold pack can be applied to the abdomen, back of the neck, and/or inside of the upper thigh. This is a technique used by first responders to treat hyperthermia. The large surface area of the abdomen, combined with the proximity of the vascular organs of the liver, stomach, and intestine, make it an ideal site for rapid heat transfer. Similarly for the ...


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Answering my own question, since I've had plenty of time to experiment recently: Immersing yourself in a pool is the fastest option, since the thermal conductivity of water is approximately 30x higher than air. Now this doesn't mean you cool down 30 times faster, because your skin is a good insulator and your body also has to pump heat out, but all things ...


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My advice is to start out walking everyday.. the simplest exercise needs mastered. If you're out of breath, that's your energy systems needing work, not your muscles. Look up anaerobic and aerobic workouts. You should start out with cardio, walk for a couple weeks, then add a few min of jogging at the end of each session. Keep going until you are jogging ...


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If you've never exercised, your first step is to start, simple as that. I can speak from experience, of course, that it's not necessarily so easy as that. Your first few sessions, you're probably going to want to quit after a few minutes both because you start feeling out of breath and because exercise can be boring if you don't feel you're making progress. ...


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I think you mean Newton's second law. First law is an object will remain at rest until acted upon by a force. Yes, using force=mass* acceleration, you can build on acceleration vs mass in order to increase force. The force output is noticeably different based on the larger of the ratio of mass and acceleration despite the output being the same. Let me ...


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