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No, explosive movements do not necessarily lead to injury. Performed correctly after a period of acclimatization, explosive movements are quite safe. The recommendation to be slow, deliberate, and under control at all times is meant for the general population. Most people are weak, prone to injury, and unlikely to seek capable instruction in explosive ...


3

I am not a TKD practitioner, but I train in several other martial arts. Here are some things to consider when developing a workout program for martial artists: Since you are female, you don't need to worry about this, but I'm dropping a note for any men who may find the question later: Carefully manage bulking. Women won't bulk the way men do, but men ...


3

If you want to increase your speed of movement and kicks, then HIIT type training is going to be your friend. Your muscles have basically two different types of fibers, Type I, and Type II. Type I are traditionally known as the "slow twitch" muscle fibers, and they are much more efficient at using oxygen (aerobic) metabolism to produce energy. These are ...


3

By changing an exercise from doing regular push ups to doing clapping push ups, what happens is that you activate your fast twitch motor fibers. So what makes you stronger faster, by doing explosive training, is the fact that you are training the muscle fibers which are more capable of hypertrophy and strength increase. By doing regular medium speed body ...


2

Perhaps just the max height for a single box jump/vertical jump (if you don't want technique to be a factor for improvement). I'm hoping/expecting that your setup allows you to increase height. I have a friend who was box jump training for a bit, he gained a few inches over maybe 2-3 months of intensive training. But I think doubling your box jump height is ...


2

You are asking about measuring two different metrics. One is power/explosiveness, the other is endurance. Technique is a factor, but really only measurable in the initial phases, which it sounds like you are past that point already. While I have no personal experience with training box jumps, other than as occasional plyometric exercises in the dojangh, I ...


2

I'm not qualified to give a full answer, this originally started out as a comment, but got too long. One thing I would add to HedgeMage's answer is, that risk assessment and fixing possible issues of eg. symmetry and core bracing would be a good idea before starting with a weight program aimed at explosiveness. Do not assume that you are ready for explosive ...


2

Firstly, you should understand that you have chosen a goal that will be difficult if not impossible to achieve. If you are currently carrying excess body fat then getting rid of that will improve your jump, but beyond that you will likely only be able to make small improvements. Explosive power is largely determined by genetics and is not trainable to ...


1

Physics wise, power is what we're typically talking about here: That is, how much work can you do (Work = F * D) and how quickly can you do it. We also know Force = mass * acceleration. Furthermore, we can break up the Power equation to be, Power = Force * D/T, which is, Power = Force * Velocity In other words, we can clearly see force is part of ...


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You allready found the answer in the first link you provided. Summary: do fast explosive compound movements no rep should last longer than 7 - 10 sec. keep the repetitions low keep 5 - 10 minutes rest between sets for ATP system to restore (you should not fatique) do plenty of sets and stop when you feel you are becoming slower with the movements focus on ...


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By definition an explosive exercise has to be explosive. How explosive is it if you do for over a dozen reps? The value in and whole point of explosive exercises comes from the dynamic effort. By going for more reps you potentially decrease the efficacy of the exercise where explosiveness is concerned. Going for more reps while retaining some explosive ...


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