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25

If you are heavier you will be stronger wether this is by fat or by muscle I think we can all agree on that. On what do you base this? Apart from very few lifts where a bit more body weight helps you, I can't see a scenario that shows having extra fat helps you lift weights. Say there is a version of me of 70kg with 10% body fat and a version of me of ...


11

Don't Confuse Size with Genetics and Training My former coach won the genetic lottery as someone who can just naturally get beastly strong. An example of that genetic pool, he took his mother to the weight room and she squatted over 300 lbs on her first day with no prior training. I'm pretty sure she was sore after that. There are several power lifters ...


10

Stop Making Excuses Don't tell me that fat doesn't make people stronger because it does. Of course many fat people are strong. Of course people get stronger faster if they aren't trying to stay under a certain weight while training. But there's that key phrase: 'while training'. The examples you cite fight sumo and lift weights. There's no magic here: ...


9

Is It Normal To Have A Belly When You Relax? Absolutely! If you've got a gut, you've got a gut; you can't be tensing your body all day; that will wear and tire you out quickly. Should You Have A Belly When Relaxed? If your goal is to have six pack, it's not acceptable. Apart from any medical issue, I see it as a result of two issues: Your body fat % isn'...


9

Alcohol tricks body to believe there is too much energy in blood, so body is enabled, or forced, to store fat. No, it does not. Alcohol contains energy, and is processed by the body similarly to fat (with an extra couple of steps in the liver needed to convert ethanol to the fatty acid acetate). Furthermore, the only thing that the body requires in order to ...


8

A difference of 0.3" (a little more than a quarter of an inch) is within acceptable measurement error on something like this. The answer to your question is: BMI does not matter for individuals A perfect example for the reason why is with the two tickets you included in your question: On Mar 4 2014 you had BF% of 16.2% and BMI 25.5 On Mar 23 2014 you ...


8

Fat does not naturally make you stronger by just existing. It's inactive. It just sits there. You can't control it. I think the misconception that fat inherently makes you stronger is brought on by two observations. First, people don't just gain fat. They gain muscle as well. Even untrained people will gain muscle in addition to fat. People with more muscle ...


7

Hopefully, I can help you sort through some of the information. I think you have every right to be skeptical of the claims on the Stronglifts site, Medhi does tend to overstate things and not dig deep at all. However, broscience is still useful when actual science doesn't have any information on the subject. The good news is that there is still some ...


7

I've seen you ask and answer questions, so I'm certain you have most of the theoretical answers you seek. Now, to make them realistic (aka broscience that's working for me). Don't eat when you are hungry. Eat when it's appropriate. Don't eat because you feel like it; eat because you don't want your body clinging to the fat you have. It's not just about ...


7

In short, you can't target fatloss. You can however make some healthy changes to your life, most of which you've already done by the looks of it. Most people have a hard time losing fat on their abdominal area. The only thing you can do is keep living healthy, tracking caloric intake, making sure you get enough rest and working out regularly. Things like ...


6

It's a fallacy that fat people unleash bigger bolts of strength. Can fat people hurt you? Absolutely! Why? Because Force = mass X acceleration and fat people have a higher mass; with a decent speed, the force generated can hurt you. It's the same reason why a fat person will injure you if they sit on you; the force (weight = mass X gravity) the weight exerts ...


6

BMI simply measures the relationship between your weight and height and doesn't care if the weight is muscle-based or fat-based. You're focusing on the wrong thing: your body fat in the first measurement was 16.3% and it changed to 13.3% in the second. The second value fell within the range of your ideal body fat. You also lost over 2-kg in body fat, all ...


6

No, this is false. You have to understand that when you gain fat, you gain it in all fat deposits on the body. It doesn't fill one deposit first, then move on to another. And on the other side of the coin, the same applies when you lose fat. Now, some fat deposits are larger than others, and more fat will be directed there. That's why you have more fat on ...


6

I wouldn't say it's first in/last out, but there are reasons why you may (or may not) put on belly fat first and lose it last. Fat cells receive a number of different hormone signals that tell them whether to store or release fat. Depending on the area of the body, the fat cells will have more or less receptors for the various messages. For example, ...


6

It's a somewhat complex question. Let's start with your first sentence: If you are heavier you will be stronger whether this is by fat or by muscle I think we can all agree on that. No, I don't agree. What is true is that in martial arts and boxing lighter fighters have a disadvantage, probably even against heavier fighters who have the same absolute ...


5

Food plus lifting equals get bigger It seems like you're saying that when you walk a lot, eat moderately, and do nothing else that you lose a little bit of weight--likely fat, but perhaps also muscle. It also seems like you're saying that when you add heavy lifting and a lot of eating that you gain weight. Nothing about that is surprising: (Lots of low-...


5

First of all, this all depends on the protein he is taking and some other life style aspects. My initial answer is that this is not a problem because supplements are simply meant to supplement your diet. getting 30 grams of protein from a shake isn't really different than getting 30 grams of protein from chicken or any other source of protein for that ...


5

To answer your question directly the answer is NO. Now let me detail why and how you can lose fat and maintain muscle in 4 points: I Rate of body fat loss 1 gram of fat is approximately 9 calories. To consume one kilogram (2.2 pounds) of fat you need to create a deficit of 9000 calories. Meaning that if you plan on losing one kilogram of fat in a week you'll ...


5

Your question is misguided in two ways. One, you assume that premodern diets are by definition optimal. If we can know the macronutrient ratio of Fat:Protien:Carb of early humans and primitive tribes we get a glimpse of the best diet there is. No, we can't. There's no reason for an indigenous people's diet to be optimal in any way. It simply does not ...


4

One possible explanation for the height discrepancy: consider that throughout the day, your precise height is not constant. In the morning after you wake up, you are actually slightly taller than you are in the evening when you go to bed. Another explanation is variability in posture, as well as measurement imprecision. As has been mentioned elsewhere, ...


4

Everybody loves anecdotes so I'll start with one. I got to pick the brain of this great bodybuilder named Bernie Cooper once on Christmas Eve in a bar in Edinburgh. The man obviously did have some "assistance", but he told me the only thing he ever changed when "cutting" was that he added some cardio to his routine. Anyway, the fact is this: You'll only ...


4

What you're referring to is "spot reduction", which is the idea that you can reduce fat in one particular area. This is a myth, and proven to be untrue in numerous studies (2011 study and 1983 study). There was no significant effect of abdominal exercises on body weight, body fat percentage, android fat percentage, android fat, abdominal circumference,...


4

Body part specific fat loss is not possible. A person gradually loses bodyfat from their entire body when fat is lost. Some body parts simply carry more fat than others, so acquiring a lower (total) body fat percentage is required to see progress in "stubborn" areas. What's more, fat loss is only ever the product of being in a caloric deficit. Exercise can ...


4

The reason why it's hard to burn fat during high intensity exercise is that it's a slow and inefficient process of getting energy to the muscles. Your body will switch to using glycogen aerobically and/or anaerobically. The infamous "fat-burning zone" concept is highly misleading. It's true that we don't burn a lot of fat during high intensity exercise, ...


4

Most sports require lean performance as fat adds nothing but sport baggage. Good 40 yard times and slam dunks require it. IF you push your fat percentage below 5% other organs including the immune system will be compromised. Many Olympic performances have not gone as expected for this reason. Sumo wrestlers, cannon ball targets and cold water swimmers are ...


3

First, your BMI is something you can safely ignore given that you have ways to determine your body fat. BMI is an easy 'statistical' tool for getting rough 'population' obesity numbers. BMI for individuals does not have a dependable relationship to obesity and/or to obesity related health issues. Your body fat percentage is what matters, and looking at that, ...


3

One of my other issues is my diet I believe. My TDEE is calculated to be 2439 calories/day, How do you know that? What source? which if you take off 20% makes it 1952. I eat below 1952 every day but don't see any weight loss and I think it's because my body is used to what I eat. I don't think it works that way. If you are not getting enough ...


3

Actually I have to disagree with Baarn. There is such a thing as "omentum fat" which is visceral fat located near the stomach. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_omentum. It is not terribly uncommon among men to have larger fat deposits here, which is actually underneath the abdominal muscles, which is why the belly seems harder. A more thorough answer ...


3

What do you mean by carb deficit? There is no carb requirement level that you can be over or under. You can eat 80% carbs or 0% carbs and be fine. If your total intake of calories is less than your total calorie use, you will burn fat, even if you lie in bed all day. Wether you lose fat or muscle depends on your current amount of muscle, on your level of ...


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