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14

Yes, with practice, you could learn to control every toe individually. The reason it is difficult, is that the part of your brain which is responsible for voluntary movements, the motor cortex, has relatively little area devoted to your toes. Here is a representation of the relative area each body part has in the motor cortex: The more area devoted to the ...


12

The technique is known as the "forefoot strike". I encourage you to look at this Harvard study on the subject. The premise is that it is the natural running technique for all cultures who predate Nike. Indigenous peoples who run barefoot or in sandals typically use this technique, and it is believed that we have run that way since we left the trees. The ...


6

I would definitely not recommend landing on your "toes" specifically. When running with what people are calling "barefoot" form, you want to land on the ball of your foot or slightly back from there on the midfoot and allow your foot structure and calf muscles to absorb the impact so that when your heel touches the ground it's not really making an impact ...


6

You should do some research on flat feet, and I think you'll see that it's not really anything to concern yourself with. I have rather flat feet myself, and have never noticed a problem except when others tell me I should deal with my flat feet. In fact, if you start looking into the research a bit, you won't find any smoking guns that indicate being flat ...


4

I experience a lot of various problems with distance walking. As far as I have seen, fancy shoes or insoles do not make much of a difference. In some cases, this aid can help, but in some cases, it just reduces the symptoms of deeper issues. The first thing to check - have you build the walking volume gradually? Maybe you just need more time to adapt via ...


3

Having had flat feet for as long as I can remember, I've done quite a bit of research and tried a lot of things regarding collapsed arches. You'll find no shortage of people claiming they can fix flat feet if you buy their program or you can reverse it by using various exercises. Plenty of barefoot running websites that claim running barefoot will fix flat ...


3

To prevent blisters and the feeling that your feet are damaged after few hours of walking, get some shoes with thick and hard to bend soles. More like light hiking shoes. Don't think to get some soft and "comfortable" but something robust. I'm speaking from the experience. Blisters can occur do to shoes being too tight or too loose - which makes the feet ...


3

The ankle is a gliding joint and only really operates along 2 axes of movement. This limits your options for movement. Ultimately, the stretch you want to do is determined by what muscles you want to stretch. If you want to stretch the muscles in the inferior aspect of your foot (sole), you're options are pretty much limited to dorsiflexion (pointing your ...


3

The question of "how long" isn't really relevant because it is a constant progression. You can improve with each workout and even throughout a workout if you focus on form and mobility. Some tips to improve ankle mobility. Calf raises - before squats perform some body weight calf raises that stretch your calves (go below flat) Stretches - what worked for ...


2

I have always been told I walk on my toes, and when I started running, at the same time, I had been doing a lot of stair climbing (I started doing stair climb races (CN Tower, Empire State Building, Rockfeller Center) and spun running off that idea) and that got me used to toe running as well. You will find it takes a lot of calf strength and lots of time ...


2

For the heel-strike, the short answer is that neither one is inherently more or less healthy. The natural tendency among walkers is to heel-strike when walking along a smooth surface and to use toward the toe when walking along elevated or uneven surfaces. The next time you go for a walk outside, do it barefoot and pay close attention to your feet. In my ...


2

Here is what has worked for me, to some extent. (Unfortunately, I cannot guarantee that this will work for you!) A physical therapist made me do single leg balance exercises. These exercises reinforce not only the hip adductors and abductors, but also the ankle and the muscle responsible for maintaining the arch under your foot. After a few months of doing ...


2

If you are rolling over your toes for instance in between cobra/up- dog and downward facing dog, and your skin is not too think on the upper parts of the feet/toes, this may happen. What you can do is to not roll over your feet, but instead mindfully flip the feet. On the other hand in cobra/up- dog you're pressing the top of the feet down the mat... Try ...


2

A good test of ankle mobility is to get near a wall and put your foot close to the wall toward it, with about 4 inches between your big toe and the wall. then squat and try to get your knee to touch the wall without lifting your heel. Do not let your knee cave either. Eventually your heel will lift up the closer you get to the wall. there is no gold standard ...


1

I have almost the same problem of the flat foot (not severe problem but bad enough). As I am in physiotherapy and performance training business I ‘ve asked many people (experts in their field) what I should do. From sports physios and orthopaedic doctors to CrossFit trainers to professional weightlifters. After trying different approaches, this is what I ...


1

What worked for me (TBF, dance, not yoga), was to kneel with a towel rolled up under my ankles and just stay there for a while every day. Every few days I'd unroll the towel a bit, getting lower and lower to the ground. On the flip side, I worked the front; from all fours with my feet flat I'd use my ankles to kick my feet off the ground, higher and higher ...


1

As with most exercises that you can't do initially, progressions are probably key. If you can't lift the big toe separately from the others, I suspect you can at least modify the amount of pressure. Try reducing and increasing pressure in your big toe. Even if you can't see movement, I suspect you can feel the difference and you can practice that. Secondly, ...


1

As someone who has walked five marathons, I have the following advice: Go to a running store where the staff will actually watch you walk and observe whether you are pronating, etc. You should have a shoe that is about 1/2 size bigger than what you normally wear for everyday use because your feet swell during distance walking. You are supposed to have a ...


1

I fail to see why the base of the foot being flat should cause the leg to tip over, rather than being a normal leg that just has more of the sole of the foot on the ground. If your hip, knee, and ankle are misaligned like the following image, then I think you should work on the knee valgus. Use Bret Contreras' diagnostic tests to see whether your valgus is ...


1

Disclaimer: I am not an expert in running form or podiatry. This is my own experience. I have a bunion on one foot, which was I suspect caused by over-aggressive rock climbing shoes, but when it flares up it can also make running painful. What seems to set off the pain is shoes that put lateral pressure on my toes (i.e. squeeze my toes together). What ...


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