11

Tom Kurz says it's a misconception that most people are physically incapable of training up to a full side split: There are simple tests that show you that for the great majority of people the structure of joints and the length of ligaments are not the obstacle for doing splits. You can use these test to determine if you have the potential to do front and ...


9

At a first glimpse the standing desks seem like another "improvement" companies throw to an item to make customers upgrade and re-buy the same thing. Essentially it's just a desk, right? That's what I thought until I started my current job which provided me with a standing desk. My job is sedentary and very static. I experimented and on some days remained ...


9

A recent meta-analysis of 23 published studies is MacEwen, MacDonald, and Burr, "A systematic review of standing and treadmill desks in the workplace," Preventative Medicine 70(January 2015):50-58. The article is here: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.11.011 Quoting from the paper's summary: Treadmill desks led to the greatest improvement in ...


7

Calf Muscle Flexibility The important thing to remember about the calf and heel cord are that there are actually 2 muscles that need to be stretched, the gastrocnemius and the soleus. The first is done with the knee straight and the Second is done with the knee bent. When doing these stretches make sure that your heel is aligned with the toes so that you ...


7

According to Dr. Jos Verbeek of The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, "What we actually found is that most of it is, very much, just fashionable and not proven good for your health."


6

There are two elements to front-splits: The hamstrings and the hips. Both will need stretching to accomplish what you want. You'll also need to strengthen the surrounding musculature, or you'll be stretchy but not strong enough to safely get into and out of the position(s) you want. The length of time it'll take you to achieve this will depend on your ...


6

Deep squats performed properly with decent weight will open up your hips. Your squat stance ends up being wide, and the weight causes your "hip" muscles (hamstrings, adductors, etc) to get pulled on like a rubber band, which stretches them. Back squats really are just that magical.


6

There are many kinds of weight training. A well-designed program designed to develop strength, power, conditioning, and athleticism for sport will not make you less flexible. The movements themselves in such a program will make you more flexible and even force you to improve mobility in order to complete the program. Hallmarks of such an approach are full ...


6

Flexibility is training just like any other training. There is no gene for flexibility. And, just like any other training, it will follow the same sort of timeline as any other exercise regimen. Nobody can tell you with any certainty how you will respond to stretching, unfortunately. If you want to increase your flexibility, you need to be working all the ...


6

Yes, not only can you do yoga. I would say you should do yoga. Sure, yoga has a reputation of being performed by people who are already very flexible, but yoga and other types of stretching is how you get there. For any position that you can't do because you're too inflexible, or are suffering from tight muscles, there's always a more moderate position you ...


5

The issue related to bad external rotation and bad internal rotation: a reason can be that the shoulder blades are hunched together due to reasons such as too much sitting/typing work where the hunched shoulder blades (like too much sitting, too much benchpress) can impair the rotation movements and where the right arm in the internal rotation could not ...


5

I heard that weight training will lower a person's flexibility over time This is one of the many weight training myths that seem to pop up every now and then. Myth #7: Weight Lifting Decreases Flexibility. One of the realizations people who get into weight lifting have is how inflexible they are. Years of sedentary lifestyle may have tighten your ...


5

Anecdotal, I've been using a standing desk for about a year. I write software so it used to be ~8hrs sitting. Now I'm always standing. Dont notice a difference tbh. Some days my legs and lower back are sore if I happened to walk to work that day. If anything, now when I sit for a long time my lower back feels some soreness on getting up.


5

Being immobile in one position (whether sitting or standing) for long periods of time is just not good for you. Sit too long and you get all those posture problems and what not. Stand too long and blood pools to your calves. The natural state of man is to go between periods of rest and motion. Either you are laying around loafing or MOVING (walking, ...


5

First, a correction of a misconception. You don't stretch ligaments. Ligaments connect bone to bone, and if they stretch out, they don't go back to their original shape. This makes joints loose and easily dislocated. (Very common in repeat shoulder dislocations). You stretch muscles. Stretching before exercise - Studies have shown that static (reach and ...


5

"For example I always feel my quads after squatting and hardly ever feel my hamstrings." This is because squatting is a quad dominant exercise, this is normal. Yes squats use your whole leg but you wouldn't 'feel it' in your hamstrings as much (if at all) than your quads. "I can go to parallel but an attempt to go below results in form degradation " Why ...


4

Butterfly stretch is a good one to open up the adductors (I think that's the name- anatomy newb). Stretching your piriformis would be a good move as well, youtube by Kit Laughling. Practicing activation of your pelvic muscles involved in anterior/posterior tilt movements, detailed here


4

First, do the exercises in their full length, i.e. no 10 inch squats, no half-assed bench presses where you don't even touch your chest, no lat pulldowns where you yank the weight with your whole body to only reaching your chin. Second, flexibility training, this does not mean that you should spend a few minutes doing some improvised stretching movements, ...


4

This is actually not true. Flexibility is lowered by not reaching end ranges of motion. Weight training, if performed to end ranges of motion, increases flexibility. It's essentially many repetitions of dynamic stretches. Being weighted actually forces an increase to end range of motion. On the other hand, if you weight train without reaching full ...


4

No static program will bring constant improvement. If you want to continue increasing flexibility over time, you need to do something like regularly attend a yoga class, where the exercises used progress over time and you're exposed to a wide variety of movements.


4

Excessive joint mobility and muscle flexibility can cause instability and lack of strength at end ranges of motion. Most people need to improve their range of motion because they are so immobile. But for people who are extremely mobile, pushing to further ranges of motion can cause problems. For many sports, tasks, and health in general, we want to maintain ...


4

Research is mixed regarding the importance stretching after exercise. Adaptive shortening of muscles however will cause a problem. Re-Thinking Movement Your body moves as a unit in patterns not as isolated muscles. Think in terms of movement patterns not muscles. Here's my random example that hopefully makes some sense: Think of your spine like a ...


4

Will I gain weight by doing weightlifting? Yes and no. Doing weight lifting will set the stimulus your body needs to grow (gain muscle mass), but lifting alone will be of no use. Imagine that your caloric intake was 1000 kcal per day (extreme value, just to make the point) while lifting. If your caloric intake would not suffice to supply you basic ...


4

I'd highly recommend seeing a local Physical Therapist. A full evaluation is required to properly diagnosis and plan a corrective exercise regimen based on your unique situation. I've included information below that provides an overview of typical patterns seen that are similar to what you're describing. Postural and Neuromuscular Dysfunctions When ...


4

"Ass-to-grass" (ATG) squats are unnecessary except perhaps for Olympic weightlifters. Moreover, for the vast majority of lifters, ATG squats decrease stability and force-production by slackening the hamstrings. Consider the following excerpt from "Analyzing the Squat": For most people, dropping the hips deeper would require slackening the hamstrings ...


4

As you hit on, the definition of flexibility is paramount. Rather than debate a proper definition, I'll give some takeaways I use with my clients.           The quick timeframe examples First, flexibility can improve virtually instantaneously. For instance, in those with pain, it's common for them to be "...


4

The "repetitive" part. Repetitive motions can be interpreted by the body as an injury, which in turn can lead to inflammation, which can increase muscle tension, which can decrease elasticity, and so on. Stretching/strengthening the related muscles can help reduce that inflammation by increasing the range of motion, correcting imbalances, ...


3

Having the minimum flexibility necessary to do something is suboptimal in a number of ways. One's flexibility varies naturally day-to-day, so one might not be able to do something on a given day, or might be able to do it only by compromising posture. Strength nearer the end range of motion is reduced, at the same time that injury risk is increased. ...


3

I'm on the heavier side myself, and so sitting crossed legged was a challenge, especially when I wanted to go to the temple or have a festive meal where the plate would be on the floor, can't be picked up, and has to be eaten by hand with no spoon. What worked the best for me was sitting cross legged as much as I could on the floor every day for a meal, ...


3

I'm assuming you are practicing to perform the Sirsasana and you want to strengen your arm muscles to make the head stand. Here are two exercises you can practice. Planking. When you do the Sun Salutations you go to forward bend (exhale) into half forward bend, head up (inhale) and then float/jump/step back to chatura dandasana. Before going into the final ...


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