4

I have had the exact same problem for the last year or so, but I have gotten around the problem by tying my shoes in a slight different manner (see below). From the various expects I consulted when I encounted the problem, I understand, that it usually is one of two problems for my age-group (47): a stress fracture in the foot or a inflammation of the ...


3

You basically have two questions here. First, is stair-climbing good for weight loss? Honestly, not much. This document calculates about .17 calories burned per step going up and .05 going down. If you assume that you're taking 1 step every second and continuously doing so for an hour, that's about 1800 steps up and 1800 steps down. That comes out to about ...


2

I used to have the same problem, and everywhere I looked people and science suggested one crucial exercise; short foot. Here is an article about it: http://blog.evidencebasedfitnessacademy.com/2012/10/03/evidence-based-exercise--short-foot.aspx Another exercise usually prescribed is the toe curl, however, research has shown that the short foot exercise is ...


2

I used to face the same problem as the one you are describing. The balls of my feet used to hurt when I used to run. However, I realised that my running technique might be wrong. Have you tried running only on the toes? Ideally, you are not supposed to touch the whole foot to the ground while running as this is detrimental for your knees in the long term. ...


2

I saw a podiatrist, who said that I have unusually high arches. He suggested I look for even higher arch support inserts and to come back for custom orthotics if those don't help. I asked him about plantar fasciitis specifically. He described the pain that condition causes as a sharp, intense pain near the back of the foot that's most noticeable when you ...


2

I will not diagnose, but it certainly sounds like plantar fascitis, or inflammation of the plantaris. This is likely due to over use. You can also try a tennis ball in the same fashion as the water bottle, and try pulling a towel with your toes until it's past the toes. To heal microtrauma from over-use, you have to let the plantaris rest. Because you ...


2

I think what you're really asking is how to prevent your ankle to roll outwards (or known as inverting) causing a increased amount of weight to go onto the lateral (outside) of the foot, no? A good exercise for that is to take a wobble board of some sort with the foot placed in the middle and roll it in a circle and move in different directions. To finally ...


2

I have had Plantar Fasciitis and it certainly is hard to resolve. I have also been bald for more than 30 years and I am embrace the fact that I don't have to do my hair in the morning. EVER! (Be bald and be proud ;) There are a number of exercises that you can do to help. Perhaps there are to many to list here but these have helped me. 1) Towel scrunches - ...


2

I experienced the same problem and I might have figured out the answer: The heat is caused by friction. This friction is produced because your feet can move within your shoe...so my suggestion is get some thicker, breathable socks.


2

I'd check out thinner merino wool socks or a synthetic sock specific to 'cooling.' Merino wool and specific synthetics pull sweat from the feet and help keep them cooler. Generally speaking. For example the Smartwool PhD Run (Ultra) Lights or Wigwam Ultra Cools. Even more specifically I'd look for thin double layer socks, which sounds thicker true. But, two ...


1

Based on your age, the fact the pain is bilateral (both legs) and the long duration required to trigger symptoms, it sounds like it’s a combination of factors (obviously I can't give you an official diagnosis): Blood pooling, contributing to venous insufficiency. Minimal lower extremity movement that aids venous return to your heart especially against ...


1

In my experience, load management is what is most important to tendon issues. First, reducing the load (running and rehabilitative exercises) to a manageable amount. Then, slowly increasing it. Typically, we start with static calf exercises, then calf raises, then loaded calf raises, then hops like skipping for rehab. Careful monitoring of how much running ...


1

The Achilles is not just about the calves, it's also about the feet. Feet exercises such as picking up a golf ball with your toes and dropping it into a cup, or scrunching up a towel will help. If your feet are weak, your Achilles absorbs more stress. Standing calf raises are good but consider adding other lower leg exercises to your routine, such as ...


1

Our feet absorb more force during running as compare to other body parts.So you should give extra care to your feet because foot is the most frequently injured part of the body.Proper shoe selection should be there, once you purchase right shoes then you need to maintain them and replace them when they are worn out.


1

Pay attention to if your feet are rubbing or not, I find the socks I use make the difference. I tried some short basic cotton socks and my feet get very hot. Then I got some puma socks that are meant for running and breathe a lot (my shoes also breathe pretty well) and I noticed a major difference. Make sure your shoes are good for your feet. I'm not ...


1

I can sympathize with your problem. My feet get really hot when I'm running as well. My solution for the problem was to move to minimalist shoes, in my case, a set of Xero Shoes sandals. They don't work for everyone — and they do necessitate learning a different running technique for most people as you no longer have artificial cushioning around your heel, ...


1

There are a few things you can do: When I start running and start to feel pain I decrease my speed and focus on my running form. If the pain doesn't stop after 1000-2000 meters I simply stop running. Probably you don't do the warming up the way you need to. Check for some foam roller exercise. You can do them with big glass bottle like wine one too. You ...


1

Do you have access to a rower? Obviously you are exerting force through your feet on a rower but it is not an impact like running. If you do have access to one I recommend learning good technique and then giving it a few attempts (I can provide a link to a video tutorial if you're interested). EDIT : I should also add that it could be your running style. ...


1

If he's playing at that level, getting an X-ray done shouldn't be an issue, and would be worth doing in the first instance, best to be sure. Other than the normal advice of ice, and taking anti inflamatories. If you have assess to a floatation belt, running in water is great, especially if used along with a heart rate monitor to keep the heart rate up. It ...


1

After I did some research, this is my current plan: One simple thing I can do is freeze a water bottle, then roll it underneath my arches for 5 minutes several times a day. This both massages and ices he painful arches. It looks like I might have plantar fasciitis, which often goes away in three to four months. I'm planning on using elliptical trainers and ...


1

I had an annoying pain in my foot that was sticking around and wouldn't go away for a long time, not directly caused by running long distances but certainly exacerbated by it. Of all the stuff I tried, the only thing that helped was lifting weights. I'm not sure if it was the squats, the deadlifts or a combination of them that did it, but shortly after I ...


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