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18

What you are describing suggests that your knee extensors, and particularly the single-joint quadriceps muscles—vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, and vastus intermedius—are weak. The closer that you are too the floor, the greater the moment produced at the knee. At 0°—that is, parallel to the floor—the moment is at a maximum due to the weights of the upper ...


10

Short of getting coached directly, the best tool for the job is taking video. There are a number of digital video recorders that have at least an hour of video available on the device. When you are training by yourself, you want a video recorder that can stable enough for you to stand up and trust that it won't fall over while you are lifting. You may ...


8

There can be many reasons for muscle spasms/pulls in the neck area, including (in no particular order): Insufficient food: the muscles lack the glycogen stores required and overcompensate Insufficient sleep: your nervous system is impacted when you are in a sleep deprived state, and I've had most of the neck spasm issues when in this state Bad hydration: ...


7

This has happened to me a lot over the years. I found it was caused by tightness of the levator scapulae and middle and upper trapezius and a weak lower trapezius and serratus. All largely sorted through fixing muscular imbalances, using a mixture of self myofascial release and targeted resistance work on the weak areas. Release tension in pec major/minor, ...


6

There is a certain technique of foot strike that runners use for distance running, and that's known as midfoot striking. Your issue, commonly known as runner's knee, seems to be likely from the biomechanical issue discussed in this article. In essence, if your footfalls are striking hard on the heel, then the entire shock of the impact is traveling ...


6

The bottom line is you want your shoulder in a neutral position. That doesn't necessarily mean full scapular retraction, but it's a cue that helps a lot of people. Considering your level of experience, and the fact you came off of injury I would advise you to use that scapular retraction, but only to the point where your shoulder is in a neutral position. ...


6

I would suggest starting with the barbell on the floor. If you can't, or won't, and the blocks are necessary1, then I would find some way to safely elevate yourself to the same level. Once you and the barbell are at the same level, you can work on getting your deadlift technique down. For that, I would recommend watching Alan Thrall's 5-step approach to the ...


4

The reason for that advice may have resulted from a study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research in March of 2011. Riemann, BL, Limbaugh, GK, Eitner, JD, and LeFavi, RG. Medial and lateral gastrocnemius activation differences during heel-raise exercise with three different foot positions. J Strength Cond Res 25(3): 634-639, ...


4

I'm willing to bet you don't do single leg work at all. It's not fun, but it is necessary to deal with things like this. Single leg work that supports squats include things like the following: Split squats Lunges Single leg press Bulgarian split squats (one leg elevated on a bench) Pistols You'll want to do as many reps as you can with the strong leg, ...


4

Their answers hold weight... I've noticed the pull or tear when the weight was a little heavy or a lot heavy. Also every time you actually move your head forward or look down to do the weight, it's possible to strain or tear it. Keep good posture, eyes forward and head straight. Stabilize or don't use your neck while moving the weight.


4

When I start to pull, inevitably my knee angle "wants" to open first to the point that my back is horizontal before the bar actually leaves the ground This sounds fine. Fully horizontal is a bit much, but lots of people get to near-horizontal and that's the way it should be. There's no need to keep your back angle constant from your setup. It's very common ...


4

Caveat: Proportions is an indicator of how your squat form could look. Actually measuring your limb and torso lengths and trying to mathematically deduce "correct" form is rarely beneficial, and can lead to someone trying too hard with a form that simply doesn't work for them. This is partly because no one has a handle on all of the significant factors that ...


4

You were likely taught to cup you hand in some beginner class. That's not so much "wrong," just ineffective & unnatural. It also doesn't add to your propulsive power as you may think. The cup has proven to not add any difference in propulsive power through enough studies. It also forces you to focus on a minor matter that actually adds unnecessary ...


4

We usually refrain from offering diagnoses here, for obvious reasons, but you touch on something important: Bench press prep. So I'll touch on it too. I would caution against doing the exact same prep on incline as you do on flat. On a flat bench, we covet the arched back and pinched shoulderblades, because the weight is loaded on arms that are ...


4

Others have mentioned correct breathing but i might also suggest that: 1). The weight is too heavy. If you can't do the movement correctly the first response should be to lower the weight until you can. If you can't even do it with the empty bar then there may be another, more structural, issue at hand. 2). You are possibly going to low. For romain ...


4

Does [form breakdown at a new working weight] happen to other beginners? Yes, absolutely. The degree changes, and it doesn't happen to everyone every time they add weight, but it's common. Does lifting form/technique always break down when performing the heaviest work-set for the first time? No, not every time. The goal is to dial in technique so that bar ...


3

So I believe it depends on your progression. When you just start training there is really no need for a mixed grip until you can deadlift with good form and reach heavier weigths. However doing mixed grip only on really heavy sets (>90% of 1RM) can result in injury due to not getting used to mixed grip. So training it is important. Handeling really heavy ...


3

Learning proper form in any exercise, is something that's hard to judge on your own. But that's not to say that you have to have a personal trainer with you. A lot of people these days post form check videos, where they film themselves from different angles doing an exercise, and post it online for response from a fitness community. I haven't seen any of ...


3

There are a few ways to obtain the information you want. Some colleges/universities offer a major in Kinesiology and Exercise Science. You may want to see if there is one in your area. They may provide learning programs available to the general public. A more widely accepted and cost effective source of information is to locate a certified fitness ...


3

Based on you not knowing what your shoulder muscles are called, I'm going to take a guess that you're not really doing any shoulder exercises to speak of, or at least over-emphasizing your bench press. A good rule of thumb for shoulder health is to overhead press at least as often, and more like twice as often, as you bench press. Additionally, you'll want ...


3

L-Sit Progression Foot Supported L-sit Sit down on the ground with your legs straight in front of you. Put your hands next to your thighs and push yourself up (straight arms!), leaving your feet on the ground. Hold for the assigned time period. One-Leg Foot Supported L-sit Do a foot supported L-sit, but raise one of your legs up from the ground. Tuck L-sit ...


3

Back in the 1970's, the theory was to hold your fingers together. Then people started applying engineering and science to sports. One of the early investigations was of Dara Torres, involving the hand shape that she used. She had ignored the prevailing theory, and swam with a 'relaxed' hand shape, with the fingers apart. And she was good (spectacularly so). ...


3

I'm not sure why all the downvotes but I do think the form could be improved a touch. While I would not say it is highly improper I think the athlete could benefit from squeezing the glutes in a bit more to prevent that lower back rounding. To fix this you just want to make sure you maintain tightness in your core throughout the pushup. Mentioned in that ...


3

You're pretty much using all back with your current form. Lifting with your legs is really important with a deadlift and will help you get more weight, as well as, not hurt your back. You have a really great form in your back, you just need to squat down a bit more for the full motion. StrongLifts suggest squatting down until your shins hit the bar. The ...


3

You need to position your feet so that the bar starts directly over the mid-foot. Your biggest technique issue that is visible from this video is that you are starting with the bar over the balls of your feet, rather than over the centre of your feet. You can see this in these screenshots I've taken from your video, with a vertical line superimposed over ...


2

My Recommendation I advocate deadlifting with a double overhand with no hook grip for as many warm-up sets as possible, in order to develop grip strength. For heavy warm-ups and work sets, I think a hook grip with chalk is the best way to develop grip while still moving heavy weights. I don't use the mixed grip, and would only advocate it for PR attempts (...


2

From my personal experience and, as a result, my professional opinion as a certified fitness instructor, I found that the width of the grip in "hanging leg raises" is better and longer tolerated when it is a little more than shoulder-width apart. This may be due to less impingement of the shoulder structures involved when hanging by the hands. Bracing the ...


2

My yoga instructor told me to fold my fingers over my hand with the four fingers reaching towards my wrist and my thumb goes up against the side of my pointer finger so the pad of my thumb is flat with the topside of my knuckles. This provides stability in the wristt and no injury to the fingers or nails. I sprained my wrist really bad 6 months ago and have ...


2

I have played around with this subject too, especially when I run in my huarache sandals. They slap the ground quite loudly and you can hear me coming a mile away. I read a good tip to combat this problem. When you're running, try to imagine that you are running on delicate rice paper. Land as if you're trying your best not to tear the paper - run softly, no ...


2

This strategy looks like an emulation of the effect of a slingshot, a device which mainly sees use with people benching heavier weights (300+). I have not used this device, but I've spoken with users and they recommended it, mainly for dealing with shoulder injuries. When a shoulder injury occurs, especially for people benching these sorts of weights, it ...


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