Hot answers tagged

10

It's a deadlift, meaning the weight should be dead on the floor. Touch-and-go or otherwise bouncing around is not a deadlift. Personally, I relax my grip and reset on every rep. My hands don't come off the bar, but I open my fingers, ensuring that the weight is indeed dead on the floor. The extra second this adds to each set is negligible and the benefit ...


10

The hand should be wrapped around the bar as much as possible, but the wrist would be straight down. I guess that would mean the bar would fall on the palm right under the knuckle of the hand. However, a common issue, especially as the weight gets heavier, is the bar will roll away from the palm. There are a couple strategies people use to mitigate this: ...


9

The hookgrip hurts, but it's not dangerous. I'm not sure how you envision yourself losing a thumb. The roundness of the bar is far too dull to actually cut the thumb off. If you're worried about the restriction of blood flow, this is also not a real threat. In some orthopedic surgeries, tourniquets are applied to restrict bloodflow, to prevent bleeding ...


8

For support grip and crush grip you use two different muscles (both are used, but in either movement, there is a different main muscle). For the support grip, you flex the distant part of your phalanges (fingers) by the action of the flexor digitorum profundus. For the crush grip, you flex the proximal part of your phalanges by the action of the flexor ...


8

The answer is that there is no standard for rating grippers. Unlike weights, which are very hard to argue, grippers have ratings similar to resistance bands. Do you rate them at the starting point, mid-way, the strength required to full-close? It could be simply that the Heavy Grips 100 (100 lb) is the strength required to close and the Captain's of Crush (...


6

Yes, this is why the bars used in women's Olympic weightlifting competition have a smaller diameter, of 25mm, rather than the 28mm used for the men's bars. This is intended to allow hook grip despite women typically having shorter fingers than men. (For comparison, bars used in powerlifting typically have a 27mm diameter for a dedicated deadlift bar, or 28-...


5

Bottoms-up kettlebell. It will definitely increase grip strength. For example, one exercise I do is that I start in a squat and swing the kettlebell from the floor to the bottoms-up position as I stand. I also do an exercise where I hold the kettlebell bottoms-up and step up and down onto a platform. A more standard type of exercise is just to carry the ...


5

This topic can be as divisive as whether training deadlifts with straps is effective or not. Since powerlifting is my background, and powerlifters tend to be the biggest proponents of the false grip (AKA suicide grip), I'll attack the question from that perspective. Beginners Have no reason to use a false grip on bench press. There's too much they need ...


4

It really isn't that big of a concern. The biggest difference in stress on the back is that the shoulders are hit slightly differently. The overhand grip spreads the weight of the bar across the whole shoulder, and the suppinated grip hits between the spine and shoulder blade. So yes, there is a slight imbalance. But a big part of it is just like your ...


4

John's answer is correct - all in all, it's hypertrophy (TUT) vs strength (rest). I just wanna add that it's a matter of how long the stoppage lasts, and not the reason that made you stop (as long as you're remaining in the starting position). e.g. resetting your grip is equal to stopping for a breath. There is no definition for how long the bar should lay ...


4

That 'outwards' sort of grip is commonly referred to as 'suicide grip' for obvious reasons. While it may not be dangerous on many exercises, on the Bench Press for example it can be very harmful (even deadly, hence the name) to use it. With this grip it is way easier/more likey that the bar just slips out of your hands crushing the whole weight onto your ...


3

I'm not sure what a gripping match is but you should be able to improve your grip with two or one arm hanging.


3

So you either have weak grip or your hands are actually physically slipping. Both very fixable issues, so don't be discouraged! If it is ACTUAL slipping, then there's a few things you can do. First, flour doesn't work NEARLY as well as just pure chalk. You know the stuff that olympic lifters use? You can get some at any supplement store or sports store for ...


3

The major muscle groups in any variation of bench press are the pec major and minor, and the triceps (with various other muscles playing stabilizing roles). In general, the narrower one's grip, the more the triceps tend to become the primary mover. The close-grip bench press is, indeed, a vary popular accessory for people who have weaker triceps. In ...


3

Yes, having a better grip makes pull-ups a lot easier, and increases the number you can do, often dramatically.


3

Yes, depending on your goals Resetting your grip likely takes a bit of time, perhaps a few seconds, perhaps 10 or more. During this time, your hamstrings are (mostly) resting. This changes the results of the exercise somewhat. From a hypertrophy standpoint, the more you are 'resting' between reps, the more you're losing a bit of Time-Under-Tension, which ...


3

TL; DR: The unwrapped position is called the "suicide grip". 'Nuff said. While you state that if the bar rolls, your thumb won't stop it, the thumb gives you enough control over the bar that you are much less likely to roll it. And realistically, if you are at all worried that you might lose control of the bar, you should be using at least one spotter. (You ...


3

Do chin ups and pull ups on a bar with a larger than normal diameter. This will make it slightly difficult to grip the bar while you try to lift your body weight.


3

I don't see why you would generate swing during the hang, so I have to assume that you start the hang with some swing. In that case, just make sure you don't release your feet from the platform until you've ensured that your body is at equilibrium. In order to stop rotation, you're going to have to make an effort to counter the rotation. Hanging from one arm ...


2

Overhand grip will focus on your forarms more than a underhand grip. Most people will be better at a overhand grip. Ref: http://www.umich.edu/~mvs330/f00/domination/main.html Optimal position for your hands on the bar depends entirely on how your body is built. Someone with strong arms can do a vertical hang (narrow grip) easily and someone with strong back ...


2

Gripping tight would also create tension in your body, which helps for exciting the CNS. Here is a link: http://www.rdlfitness.com/use-a-tight-grip/ It would get your grip stronger, it would increase your pull-up power.


2

Cost benefit analysis: If thumbless is more comfortable, you might conceivably lift a few more pounds. If the bar slips out of that grip, unless your spotters ALREADY had a grip on the bar (ie, it was already not a real lift (google "Clemson 640 bench." Perfect example of a non-lift.)), its gonna mash your face/neck/ribs before they even have a chance to ...


2

It really depends on what you consider to be the primary part of the exercise, and whether someone is doing this for the exercise, or to show off. Most hand-grippers are essentially springs, which means resistance increases as it's compressed, which should make the initial setting easy to budge. However, at that uncompressed position, you may be forced to ...


2

It's fine. Something like the Captain of Crush grippers are made of metal, with a knurling like texture to the handles to increase friction (in a pinch I've used the knurling on them to file bits off a callus, that's how rough they are). The abrasions might be causes by sharp bits of plastic that was hidden under the foam, just file them off or cut them off ...


1

I've always found that my forearms/wrists/hands grow significantly when I'm deadlifting frequently. I've also found that my forearms/wrists/hands burn when I do straight-bar bicep curls. Try incorporating more deadlifts and straight-bar bicep curls into your workouts. If you've never deadlifted, it would be worthwhile to have an experienced friend/trainer ...


1

Start with push ups and then superman push ups over time they will get stronger Watch this video https://youtu.be/SeSUzyDBXWY! Wolf flybynature Superman Push ups


1

Wrist curls are good, as well as the reverse of them. Pushups on a clenched fist as well as do farmers walks. One of the best I've seen though, and one of my favorites, are the grip strength trainers from "Captains of Crush".


1

I don't really know many other exercises you could do with these things. As to benefits? A neutral grip (wrists straight and facing one another) position reduces a lot of wrist stress that people experience doing normal push-ups These handles can rotate on the small contact point on the floor, following along with the natural shoulder rotation. This ...


1

DeeV's answer didn't give the third option: using weightlifting straps. With straps, you use a double overhand grip and the straps keep the bar touching the palms of your hands. Unless you plan on being a competitive powerlifter, there is no reason to use either hook grip or mixed grip. Both hook grip and mixed grip tear up your hands without really ...


1

Potentially gripping too wide, however if this does not cause any pain or discomfort it is likely not going to affect your wrists (but best to sort it out now). It could just be potentially your form but you would have to check this online. If you watch a form video you can see whether your form is similar and also see the wrists and grip.


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