Hot answers tagged

10

It's a deadlift, meaning the weight should be dead on the floor. Touch-and-go or otherwise bouncing around is not a deadlift. Personally, I relax my grip and reset on every rep. My hands don't come off the bar, but I open my fingers, ensuring that the weight is indeed dead on the floor. The extra second this adds to each set is negligible and the benefit ...


10

The hand should be wrapped around the bar as much as possible, but the wrist would be straight down. I guess that would mean the bar would fall on the palm right under the knuckle of the hand. However, a common issue, especially as the weight gets heavier, is the bar will roll away from the palm. There are a couple strategies people use to mitigate this: ...


9

The hookgrip hurts, but it's not dangerous. I'm not sure how you envision yourself losing a thumb. The roundness of the bar is far too dull to actually cut the thumb off. If you're worried about the restriction of blood flow, this is also not a real threat. In some orthopedic surgeries, tourniquets are applied to restrict bloodflow, to prevent bleeding ...


9

In general, neutral grip (palms facing each other) presses are much easier on your shoulder. This is true of the dumbbell bench press, pull ups, etc. By easier, I mean less stress on the connective tissue (ligaments and tendons), rotator cuff, as well as being more mechanically advantageous. That means you can load it heavier with a neutral grip (palms ...


8

For support grip and crush grip you use two different muscles (both are used, but in either movement, there is a different main muscle). For the support grip, you flex the distant part of your phalanges (fingers) by the action of the flexor digitorum profundus. For the crush grip, you flex the proximal part of your phalanges by the action of the flexor ...


6

I do barbell rows overhand, like exrx recommends and like Arnold does and like this StrongLifts-doing guy does. I think underhand would turn them into curls when they're challenging. StrongLifts specifically recommends against the underhand grip.


6

Yes, this is why the bars used in women's Olympic weightlifting competition have a smaller diameter, of 25mm, rather than the 28mm used for the men's bars. This is intended to allow hook grip despite women typically having shorter fingers than men. (For comparison, bars used in powerlifting typically have a 27mm diameter for a dedicated deadlift bar, or 28-...


5

This topic can be as divisive as whether training deadlifts with straps is effective or not. Since powerlifting is my background, and powerlifters tend to be the biggest proponents of the false grip (AKA suicide grip), I'll attack the question from that perspective. Beginners Have no reason to use a false grip on bench press. There's too much they need ...


5

I sweat a lot. When my grip slips because of sweat, I blame the sweat and not the bar. This approach works pretty well. I wear sweat-bands on my wrists and carry chalk. I wipe the sweat from both sides of my hands onto a towel or my shirt, then chalk my palms copiously. This keeps my grip mostly dry.


5

Bottoms-up kettlebell. It will definitely increase grip strength. For example, one exercise I do is that I start in a squat and swing the kettlebell from the floor to the bottoms-up position as I stand. I also do an exercise where I hold the kettlebell bottoms-up and step up and down onto a platform. A more standard type of exercise is just to carry the ...


4

It really isn't that big of a concern. The biggest difference in stress on the back is that the shoulders are hit slightly differently. The overhand grip spreads the weight of the bar across the whole shoulder, and the suppinated grip hits between the spine and shoulder blade. So yes, there is a slight imbalance. But a big part of it is just like your ...


4

This a multitude of things you can use. Here's a list that I suggest: Lifting straps Chalk Sand (I do this when I do my spartan races, right before the pull up bars) Of course, if there isn't any sand, I suggest bringing a little chalk to rub on your hands before you do your chin ups. This dries up your hands and enables you to lift yourself much easier. ...


4

John's answer is correct - all in all, it's hypertrophy (TUT) vs strength (rest). I just wanna add that it's a matter of how long the stoppage lasts, and not the reason that made you stop (as long as you're remaining in the starting position). e.g. resetting your grip is equal to stopping for a breath. There is no definition for how long the bar should lay ...


4

That 'outwards' sort of grip is commonly referred to as 'suicide grip' for obvious reasons. While it may not be dangerous on many exercises, on the Bench Press for example it can be very harmful (even deadly, hence the name) to use it. With this grip it is way easier/more likey that the bar just slips out of your hands crushing the whole weight onto your ...


3

So you either have weak grip or your hands are actually physically slipping. Both very fixable issues, so don't be discouraged! If it is ACTUAL slipping, then there's a few things you can do. First, flour doesn't work NEARLY as well as just pure chalk. You know the stuff that olympic lifters use? You can get some at any supplement store or sports store for ...


3

The major muscle groups in any variation of bench press are the pec major and minor, and the triceps (with various other muscles playing stabilizing roles). In general, the narrower one's grip, the more the triceps tend to become the primary mover. The close-grip bench press is, indeed, a vary popular accessory for people who have weaker triceps. In ...


3

Yes, having a better grip makes pull-ups a lot easier, and increases the number you can do, often dramatically.


3

The biggest factor of the grip is whether you'll twist it off or snap it off. The wooden one you posted on the left is at a high risk of that happening. The carbon fiber one on the left could still be at risk of twisting, but at least it won't have part of it snapping off. Ideally, it'll be a single piece, rather than having the grip glued to the shaft. ...


3

TL; DR: The unwrapped position is called the "suicide grip". 'Nuff said. While you state that if the bar rolls, your thumb won't stop it, the thumb gives you enough control over the bar that you are much less likely to roll it. And realistically, if you are at all worried that you might lose control of the bar, you should be using at least one spotter. (You ...


3

Yes, depending on your goals Resetting your grip likely takes a bit of time, perhaps a few seconds, perhaps 10 or more. During this time, your hamstrings are (mostly) resting. This changes the results of the exercise somewhat. From a hypertrophy standpoint, the more you are 'resting' between reps, the more you're losing a bit of Time-Under-Tension, which ...


3

I'm not sure what a gripping match is but you should be able to improve your grip with two or one arm hanging.


3

Do chin ups and pull ups on a bar with a larger than normal diameter. This will make it slightly difficult to grip the bar while you try to lift your body weight.


2

Cost benefit analysis: If thumbless is more comfortable, you might conceivably lift a few more pounds. If the bar slips out of that grip, unless your spotters ALREADY had a grip on the bar (ie, it was already not a real lift (google "Clemson 640 bench." Perfect example of a non-lift.)), its gonna mash your face/neck/ribs before they even have a chance to ...


2

Overhand grip will focus on your forarms more than a underhand grip. Most people will be better at a overhand grip. Ref: http://www.umich.edu/~mvs330/f00/domination/main.html Optimal position for your hands on the bar depends entirely on how your body is built. Someone with strong arms can do a vertical hang (narrow grip) easily and someone with strong back ...


2

Gripping tight would also create tension in your body, which helps for exciting the CNS. Here is a link: http://www.rdlfitness.com/use-a-tight-grip/ It would get your grip stronger, it would increase your pull-up power.


2

I agree with the gist of the prior response -- it is mostly a matter of personal preference. I coach and I never tell paddlers which to use. I would add that the T grip can make any problem with blade angle in the transverse plane (whether the power face is turned you or, more rarely, away from you, rather than straight back) easier to notice and correct. ...


2

Although chalk works amazingly for grip (as a rock climber I can confirm from experience), I'm going to try to provide another answer rather than repeating what the others have already answered. You could just obtain grip tape (like for tennis rackets) and wrap it around the bar (it's made to survive the elements, and wouldn't be damaging the bar, I don't ...


2

It's fine. Something like the Captain of Crush grippers are made of metal, with a knurling like texture to the handles to increase friction (in a pinch I've used the knurling on them to file bits off a callus, that's how rough they are). The abrasions might be causes by sharp bits of plastic that was hidden under the foam, just file them off or cut them off ...


1

DeeV's answer didn't give the third option: using weightlifting straps. With straps, you use a double overhand grip and the straps keep the bar touching the palms of your hands. Unless you plan on being a competitive powerlifter, there is no reason to use either hook grip or mixed grip. Both hook grip and mixed grip tear up your hands without really ...


1

Potentially gripping too wide, however if this does not cause any pain or discomfort it is likely not going to affect your wrists (but best to sort it out now). It could just be potentially your form but you would have to check this online. If you watch a form video you can see whether your form is similar and also see the wrists and grip.


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