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8

He's 12, and you're already heading down the vanity path of worrying about muscle tone? He should be playing basketball, and eating lots of food. His body will adapt to the lifestyle, and he'll get fast and big. Any weight training should be under the careful supervision of an actual trainer. You should not be his trainer. This is because he needs to ...


7

What you are describing is called Isometric training. It’s a little used, and much misunderstood, form of training in which the muscle tenses without changing its length. Each contraction is typically done for 6 to 10 seconds at a specific angle. For example, think of a bodybuilder holding a front double biceps pose. During a competition, poses are ...


7

The number of sets you do increases what we call the total volume of work being done. The more volume of work you do, the stronger signal your body gets that it needs to grow. If you do only one set, you aren't giving your body a very strong signal to grow. If the set is heavier than last time (even if you push it to failure), you give a slightly stronger ...


6

I've written a previous answer about this, which I would recommend reviewing. In short, DOMS is not a good indicator of muscle stress, growth, recovery, or training effectiveness. It is brought about through a combination of factors, primarily eccentric exercises. From Wikipedia: Muscles undergoing heavy eccentric loading suffer greater damage when ...


5

Marathon runners are skinny because they spend all their free time training in running and not in bodybuilding. Plus bodybuilding does not necessarily help make them become better runners. Bodybuilders can't run because they spend all their free time training in bodybuilding and not in running. Plus endurance running does not necessarily help them become ...


5

Actually, height is largely genetic. However, nutrition is what impacts it from en environmental standpoint, and not exercise (it has a slight effect, assuming you are not a professional powerlifter, marathon runner or the like). So no, you cannot increase height by doing certain exercises. The notion that training basketball or volleyball makes you taller ...


4

Will weight lifting, strength training, etc, stunt my or my child's growth? If you (or your child) aren't sprouting up as quickly as the other kids and you've been lifting weights, it's easy to resort to believing the old wives' tale that you're short because of the weight training. We may never know how this rumor began propagating, but there is certainly ...


4

What you’ve described is not an average training routine in my opinion. You’ve got a pretty heavy workload if you consider holding a job as well. You make no mention of the amount of weight, sets, or reps that you perform, so, I’ll assume from your description of not trying to build muscle, that those numbers are sufficiently low. Effectively, you’re ...


4

While you won't be able to do much to impact the actual height of your body through exercise, to help make use of what you do have for height you can do exercises to strengthen your back and shoulders, leading to a more upright natural position which appears taller. Deadlifts are a great exercise to accomplish this; within a few months you should notice a ...


4

Short answer: Yes. But don't. Long answer: It is a huge waste of your time, because you're not going to be doing more than 1-2 muscles at a time. And the set of muscles that can be worked like this is very slim. For instace, how are you going to train your lower back? Seems like the only reason you'd do this, is because you don't want to go to the gym. ...


4

100%, I've been training for about 5 years now and there was one spell were due to work I was living off about 4-6 hours sleep a night for a month. I still exercised and dieting like i normally would but I actually loss muscle strength. Sleep is were all the hard work pays off, its the chance for your body grow and recover. Without the proper recovery you ...


4

I'm going to disregard the whole "limits" part of the question, because limits are different from person to person (genetics), and it's unanswerable on an individual level. As far as training 3+3 hours per day, it's not unheard of. But as you correctly point out, you should be eating plenty of food throughout the week/month/year if you plan on attempting ...


3

Yes. Let's consider adulthood to be 18 years old. Notice the hip range of motion in basketball players as they age: Source. What we're seeing here is players lose internal rotation range of motion at the hip much more than controls. At least into early adulthood / ~early 20s. (Granted, early twenties, much less 18 years old, does not guarantee complete ...


3

You're the same height as me. I know it's a bit short, but 63 kg is a healthy weight at that height. Now, what you want is some more body weight, but with a good distribution. Unfortunately, you can't influence the distribution of your body fat. Where it goes to is genetically determined. For men, fat tends to accumulate more on the lower belly. This is the ...


3

If I recall the optimal amount of sleep for "standard" athletes is around 7h30 (+/- 30 minutes) going on the higher side if your other recovery factors (food, stress, etc.) are diminished (e.g. you're dieting down and training hard, you're in the middle of a high volume cycle, you live a stressful life, etc.). I'd recommend you read sleep, part 1 and sleep, ...


3

A very important factor here is the question: are you male or female? From what I've observed: Young women tend to stop growing taller by the time they are your age. Young men tend to keep growing till their early 20s. There are exceptions in both cases, but as a general rule this is what I've observed over the years. A friend of mine was about your ...


2

Protein powders are not different than "natural" high protein foods such as cottage cheese, poultry, eggs, etc in terms of "being natural". It's sort of real food with other ingredients removed so you'll be able to consume a lot of protein without consuming other organic compounds. In addition, I actually read about a few researches which state that high ...


2

I have a the same problem I usually do lots of dumbbell side raises on low weight just to get the shoulder pumped, this exercise really adds mass to the side of the shoulder (1 muscle of 3). Also the wide shoulders are an illusion created by a thin waist so you tend to look broader if you have a small waste. So basically loose the love handle :). But I must ...


2

Weight lifting will not affect your general growth, including height, as long as you don't starve yourself. If you want broader shoulders and a slimmer waist, do shoulder exercises and lose fat.


2

Not quite, no. When you work out, you are not actually killing cells, you are merely causing injuries in the muscle that when repaired become larger, which then causes either strength gain or hypertrophy. Cell death such as you are talking about is when cells become so damaged they can't carry out their normal function any more, or they have other ...


2

Generally speaking there is not "one exercise" that will cause "growth retardation". It is merely the type of training that you are doing that may influence the body in his development. If you are young your bonestructure is not as solid as it will be when you are grown up and its prone to alter its form and direktion to grow with acting and repeating force....


2

What limits? The point at which continued training starts being painful (not in the "feel the burn" way but "something's gonna tear" way)? The point at which you can't even lift a light weight anymore? The point at which injury occurs? Training works by disrupting "homeostasis", which is an equilibrium for your body. It is the state in which it resides, ...


2

There are a lot of factors this depends on. For example: For me, I'm trying to build muscle and gain weight. I'm eating in a caloric surplus. I'm only 19 years old; my metabolism is crazy. I workout 6 times a week for around 9-12 hours a week. I don't want to burn any fat or calories than I already am... So I never do cardio. Depends on how fast and much ...


1

A few tips here, if you are wanting to stay at 5kg or use more reps and build bigger biceps: muscles need 48 hours to recover from a workout. stick to 3 times a week. I know it seems counter productive but if you do more, you will actually make your biceps stop growing, or even get smaller! Once a day! Slow down and do 2 seconds to lift the weight, and 2 ...


1

It means your body is getting used to the load. Start increasing reps/intensity or incorporating different types of exercises (abs is a general term for upper/lower/obliques/transversal muscles etc. and different exercises hit them differently). Eventually you reach a point when you workout enough, your body doesn't really get DOMS or sore, which is ok but ...


1

Livestrong article, looks like the most legit thing on this subject. You can either get fatter (which isn't recommended, unless you're underweight of course) or you can get bigger pecs (which won't typically make much of a difference). I'd also point out better posture will make the most of what you've got, and that can be one of the results of regular ...


1

Lifting weights with proper form while maintaining a healthy diet will not stunt growth. In fact, weight lifting has many benefits for youths including increased strength for sports and higher self-esteem. In particular, Olympic Weightlifting (with its technique-heavy requirement) is very suitable for young people and if they are looking to develop into that ...


1

Growth can happen late. In my case, I hit my growth spur between the ages of 22 and 26, when I went from about 5'3" to 5'10". (My father is 5'3 and my mum 5'7 or so). You are 15 years old. I was slightly smaller than you at the same age and my best friend at the time was 6'3", I know all about being the small guy. So that's the first point. You have ...


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