17

In general, an experienced gymnast will be perfectly aware of how they are positioned in space during any vault, flip or twist. They learn to feel in which direction the floor is, and how far they are from it. "Twisties" is when you lose that sensation for whatever reason. Some reasons are you did a familiar move, but with an unfamiliar outcome ...


11

Alec's answer covers how it manifests, but it is commonly caused by things such as stress and PTSD, as this article from a former competitive gymnast describes (though it arguably also assumes quite a lot about Biles' state of mind) There are many causes, but one of the most common is stress or PTSD, the symptoms of which Simone was starting to display over ...


9

Jim Bathurst, known for his web site Beast Skills, says in his human flag tutorial: If you can do several full range handstand pushups against the wall, then you’re well on your way to getting the flag. Overcoming Gravity, a popular book on gymnastic training for adults, has a chart comparing the difficulty of various skills. In the chart, a full human ...


7

This is not a traditional gymnastics move, and in addition would be nearly impossible to pull off without assistance. (Note the guy holding his body out vertical with the rope). It is impressive, but it is solely a strength move, much like the people that can "spider walk" while hanging from a bar and other similar strength moves. Training for it is ...


5

Official gymnastic rings are 2,8 cm wide while most gyms ones are 3,0 cm wide. As gymnasts wear padding/gloves the ring they use feel fatter. Many crossfit like rings are 3,2 wide. The main difference between various thicknesses is how easy you can achieve a "false" grip. Narrower rings make it easier. So if you have small hands and you want to practise ...


5

I have no idea where you're getting your body image from of male ballet performers (as an example) being anything other than powerhouses. They don't train for hypertrophy, but plenty of male dancers (contemporary, ballet, etc) have very muscular physiques. I'd venture to guess that the guy below (a contemporary dancer) has far better strength performance ...


5

I'm not aware of any testing being done, and there is no guarantee that it would produce injuries, but it certainly could produce injuries. Some possible examples are: Torn/strained muscles Torn tendons Stretched/torn ligaments Avulsion fractures (Tendon tears away taking a piece of bone with it) Actual fractures/dislocations That is by no means an ...


5

Both triangular and circular handles have existed since gymnastic rings were invented in the early 19th century.1 The circular style quickly became the sole variety used in gymnastics. Speaking from experience, I would put this to the following reasons: Round rings provide room for a false grip, a technique in which the wrists are hooked over the rings, as ...


4

Can you help me understand how they actually work? They are used to help stabilize the wrist to prevent hyperextension and to support the wrist. When worn properly they apply pressure around the wrist pushing it towards a neutral position. Some of them told me that they do this by keeping the wrist in a more neutral position (which I think is false, since ...


3

There are many different variables at play here, and it's not just restricted to exercise routines... Weight: It takes less effort to push a 110 lb body off the mat than it does a 200 lb body, so by having a leaner body they are more efficient with their muscles. Practice: It takes practice to do complex moves, and flips are certainly no exception. Simply ...


3

Because you mentioned cheerleaders and the splits position: I think what you mean is the needle pose. The link leads to a wikihow article on how to train for it. They mostly mention how important it is to warm up properly. Both your legs and back need to be warm and stretched. In the linked article they say to practice this move by performing you splits on ...


3

L-Sit Progression Foot Supported L-sit Sit down on the ground with your legs straight in front of you. Put your hands next to your thighs and push yourself up (straight arms!), leaving your feet on the ground. Hold for the assigned time period. One-Leg Foot Supported L-sit Do a foot supported L-sit, but raise one of your legs up from the ground. Tuck L-sit ...


3

Extensive bodyweight exercises and repetition of their art for hours at a time is basically the answer. As noted by Dave above, Christopher Somner's writings are generally considered to be the fundamental word on it. His website can be found here. It's prohibitively expensive to get an actual copy of his seminal work, Building the Gymnastic Body, although ...


3

TLDR: You need to do more than just psuedo planche pushups. if it's possible to learn a planche by only doing psuedo planche push ups? I wouldn't say so. Doing psuedo planche pushups helps and it a good progression tool, but you need to work your entire body to be able to hold a planche. Chest, shoulders, scapula, core. To a certain extent you even need to ...


3

Active flexibility is the combination of static flexibility in the muscle being stretched, and isometric strength at short muscle lengths in the antagonist of that muscle. So if you have the required static flexibility, then antagonist strength is what's limiting you. I'd suggest two forms of training for this: Attempting to perform the leg raises, and just ...


2

You might need to obtain prescription swim goggles in order to spot the surface of the water (or other visual reference points) more accurately. Many divers think that simply “feeling” the dive in the air is enough, but in order to dive consistently, you must learn how to spot. For most, learning to spot is a challenge, but there are some tricks you can ...


2

Can you gain height after puberty? No. Can you gain height through exercise? No. Your bone structure determines your height and after puberty has passed, that is fixed. Get used to being the height you are, accept and embrace it. I'm 5ft 4in and I think its great. As for exercises to build muscle, do compound barbell movements building up to heavy weight ...


2

Adding an inch at 23 is very unlikely, 6 inches naturally is impossible unless your body undergo some hormonal imbalance(which does more harm than good). At around 17-18 you reach almost 99% of your height. Any extra increase won't be noticeable. Whoever tells you otherwise, is selling lies or just trying to sell you some marketing scam. Just accept it and ...


2

I'd say absolutely yes. Gymnasts perform some of the most impressive feats of physical strength of all time. This is because at all times, they perform feats using only their own bodies as resistance. That gives them an amazing ratio of strength to bodyweight. Since it will generally improve your lean muscle gain, I believe it will decidedly aid you in ...


2

Overcoming Gravity recommends the following progression: Rings Strap Handstand Pushups L-sit / Straddle-L Straight-Arm Press Handstands Full Back Level (With Supinated Hands) 1/2 Layout / 1 Leg Extended Front Lever Rings Advanced Tuck Planche Rings Dips (Deep & With Rings Turned Out to 75 Degrees Past Parallel) For the actual movement itself, if you ...


2

The problem lies in the position of your shoulders. You can clearly see on both pictures that your right shoulder (left in the picture) is slightly higher and more opened up (as in your arm is rotated further out) than the left shoulder. This causes the rest of the body from that point on (so arms, elbows, hands) to act different from each other. I wonder, ...


2

Honestly, there really is not a master flexibility course. It's whatever stretches you need to do for your particular problem. Stretch after your workout, when the muscles are warm, instead of at the beginning (when you just want to be warming up). Stretch to the point of mild discomfort (not pain), hold it about ten seconds, ease back to 90%, and then pulse ...


2

The 90/90 stretch: puts one hip in internal rotation and the other in external rotation. I think dynamic stretching may be better. This video shows some martial arts inspired dynamic external/internal hip rotation stretches: VAHVA Fitness: Intelligent Hip Mobility Training.


1

If you want to get better at calisthenics you seem to be on the right track. Things like push-ups, pull-ups and L-sits are very good basics to get the strength required for more advanced moves you'll learn later down the road. The next step I would suggest you to focus on are handstands and muscle-ups. And here's why: To do more advanced calisthenics moves ...


1

Pigmie's "How to do a MUSCLE UP in only 5 Minutes". I know that you said you're looking to start with the high pull-ups, but if your stated goal is muscle-ups, why not advise you that direction? I will first state that I am not an expert, and I have not learned to do this myself. However, I have gone through other tutorials by this fellow and he seems to be ...


1

I would not suggest to use momentum first (i.e. kipping muscle-up). I would suggest to master strict muscle-up first then learn how to do kipping muscle-up. If one does not have the structure to support strict muscle-up, kipping muscle-up could mess up his shoulders. I would suggest working on eccentric muscle-up i.e. starting from the end of the muscle-up ...


1

To start learning a muscle-up you need to know how to use momentum. You need to start doing explosive pull-ups, to get the momentum upwards. You can also use your legs to create even more momentum, pull your legs up (knees towards your chest, or towards the pull-up bar) as you do an (explosive) pull-up. This way you'll get so high, you'll practically be ...


1

If you have 5 minutes here you go. Magic Note: This works - but this may not be addressing the actual issue as Eric said above.


1

Are you a hot bath kind of person? Sit in a hot bath for 3 minutes and try to touch your toes while sitting. Or if your gym has a sauna, sweat it out for 5 minutes, then try to touch your toes. Like anything, practice makes perfect, i.e., consistency. Another good way is to get into a "sumo pose," touch the floor, then lock out your knees so your legs are ...


1

Traditionally speaking, the technique generally used for training a person for a back handspring involves either a spotter with their hand lightly on your back, ready to push up if you need it, or a giant foam roller so that you can literally roll through the movement at first. Other than that, the other bit of advice I seen is doing the back handspring a ...


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