10

A marathon is altogether different league when compared to a 10 km run. There are many things to consider... Hydration. You should have a proper hydration plan in your long distance races. For 10 km races, you wouldn't probably have had hydration during the race course. In a marathon, I would advice you to start hydrating from the 5 km mark. From there ...


6

I'd take a look at the free half marathon training plans from Hal Higdon. Plans are available for all skill levels. The general formula for the beginner plans is as follows: Monday: rest Tuesday: 3 to 6 km run Wednesday: half of long run distance Thursday: 3 to 6 km run Friday: rest Saturday: long run (gradually increasing to 20 km) Sunday: ...


6

Yes, although In the fitness world especially, excess cardio will drain your calories and reduce muscle which is needed for powerlifting. On the other hand, lifting heavy weights and gaining weight will make your body slower or fatigue faster. That being said, you can absolutely do both! Your progress will just be slower in each activity, and you might not ...


5

Source: I've done one marathon, a 50k, and many, many, many runs at distances under that. I'm no expert just relaying what I've learned and come to understand. Hope you find it helpful. Running The key to running marathons is, well, running. Strength training is important as well, as building your core and supporting muscles will aid in your overall ...


5

I would rather say it is not about waiting if not about preparation and training. I've seen people starting from the zero(in terms of running, otherwise in a good fitness) with 16 weeks plans and successfully completing their first marathons, so i would say the 5 months you have ahead of you should be enough. however don't go crazy and set some realistic ...


5

I think breaking 3 hours or better for a marathon or 1.20 for half is very unlikely on training just at the weekends. Of course it depends on your starting point, and if you do lots of other cardio work during the week. Even if you are extremely talented, you still have to train to get the good results. I know many people who run sub 3 hour marathons, and ...


5

I cannot tell whether running 21+ km once a week is too much for you body, but I can say that I have done this weekly for the last 2 years (give and take) without any major problems. Just LSR (long slow runs), not races every week! I do 8-12 HM races a year and usually 2-3 marathons. One old rule-of-thump is that you should run 1.5 x you target distance on ...


4

Since you have 8 weeks left you have plenty of time to build your LSD base. Lets assume that your 21k was your week one, the rest of your LSD runs would look something like two weeks of increased distance, followed by an easy week, then another two weeks. You should then taper your last 2-3 weeks before your race. I think at the 30k distance you can make ...


4

In my opinion the furthest I would go in training pre marathon is about 22 miles. And I would only do 1 of these. The rest of the long runs I would suggest should be between 18-20 miles. The reason I say this, is that running the full 26 miles takes a lot out of you, and I think would have a negative affect on the actual marathon rather than a positive. ...


4

I would suggest at least a few of your longer runs be at night, around the same time as the race will be. Most of the time, the reason for the early morning start times is a combination of it being cooler in the morning, plus there is (usually) less traffic to have to reroute for a half marathon route than during a race that occurs closer to mid-day. Other ...


3

The 5 weeks have passed, so you probably already have completed your half marathon :-), but here goes: There are a lot of things you're not telling, so my answer is based on what info you do provide. As a rule of thumb, you can (within reasonable limit, of course) run twice the distance you think you can run, and since you know you can run 12 km, a half ...


3

To keep rhythm I use a watch connected to a podometer and a heart-sensor. I look at the watch once or twice per minute maybe, I don't think about it, it's just a routine. if my running rhythm is too high: I can see that the frequency of my heart is slowly increasing, so I can adjust my rhythm and slow down just a little. This can be done long before I ...


2

No. Marathons are significantly harder than halves and you will need to get your long run up to around 32km in order to complete. You mention that there is a couple of months in between. This would give you enough time.


2

Considerations should be for when to eat. You need to be fuelled for the race, but not so full you are uncomfortable to race. YOu will need to see what works best for you. Whether to eat your last meal later or whether to fuel the race with snacks or a carbohydrate drink. The only way to know this is to practise during training. If it was me I could ...


2

A lot depends on what you mean by "training" for your half marathon. Are you just trying to finish it, are you looking to get under 1:30, are you trying to qualify for a higher level race? Those are big differences in training intensity. The best I've found is going into running mode with a decent amount of mass, and then making sure you're lifting heavy ...


2

I find it hard to define a regimented schedule that you can follow for that span of time. The main advice you can follow for any distance is that you have to listen to your body as you go. Good nutrition and hydration must also be maintained. And at each level you also want to keep your training interesting so that you stick with it. 5k 12 weeks gives you ...


2

Each one would have a different effect on fitness, but in theory both would be good options. One long 24-26 mile run would help ensure you go the distance on race day. Three ten mile runs with breaks would allow you to run at a slightly faster training pace for the overall mileage. It really depends on what your marathon goals are (i.e. crossing the finish ...


2

Everyone body behaves differently to temperature and humidity, but you can look at the "Heat Index" If the heat index is high enough then you know that you will have to adjust your pace for the race. For example: If you are running a Marathon at 90f and 90% humidity the heat index will be 122. If the temp is 80 and the humidity is 40% then the heat index is ...


2

I'm being a bit (very?) anal here, but it's a 10k not a marathon nor is it a quarter marathon. In any case, a week is a very short time to get ready! You need to start running outside on the real road or trails. This is because treadmills don't work on all the same muscles as the real road. The machine maintains in a way pushes you at all times so you can ...


2

To answer the title question literally, no -- the best way to practice running is to run. That's not to say that step training can't be helpful -- it's just that running up and down stairs is not a substitute for running hills, because it's not the same motion, and it won't help you as much as actual running. Also step running would lend itself more easily ...


2

Do the week as-is. As the 13.1 miles is on the week after I would not suggest bringing the 12 miles run week forwards.


2

First you should make sure you are not over doing in in your training, but having said that if your long run is at 13 miles then yes you can do a Marathon in 15 weeks. Ideally you want 16-18 weeks for training, but if you are already running 13 miles in sub 2 hours you are in decent shape. You should look at a Marathon training plan with a goal of around 4 ...


2

By the looks of it you are doing pretty good for yourself and yes age is on your side. If you have mental strength and strong will power that go for it. Remember you are young only once so try it as hard as possible. Train with proper plan and vision, focus is the key. Put on some kickass motivational music of your preference and practice hard, also get ...


2

Brief answer: Don't give up. Full marathons are complex and tough to get right. Think carefully about hydration and nutrition during the race. I used to run competitively. My marathon PR is 2:32 in Chicago. But I've also run some miserable full marathons. Even shorter races like 10K, I've known I was in much better shape than my race. My best advice about ...


2

Join a local running club. There is always someone there that is training for a marathon.


1

The essential part of training for any marathon runner is endurance. You have to build the stamina required for the run you have selected; it can be a 5K, 10K, half marathon, or a full. For a beginner; I will suggest the following plan, Always remember your capability and try to push it to make yourself better every day.


1

You could also use Nike Running app, it has plans like the distance you want to run, it uses also height, weight, distance to generate the plan according to your needs. No, I don't work at Nike, I'm just a fellow runner. There are other similar running apps you can check as well. Good luck.


1

My advice to you is to stay sport specific. If you are relatively serious the only thing you need to do is : RUN ALOT. Presumably you are not a professional or amateur level athlete. That being the case, the only thing you really need to work on is getting your endurance to the point where you can actually finish a marathon(Which I presume you can't do). ...


1

I agree with Eric. The biggest mistake you can make is to remove or lower your weights. Keep the intensity up and if necessary, lower the volume by a set or two. I would try and get three sessions in a week, but keep them short. No more than half an hour. Stick with compound movements.


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